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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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With the addition of the back window inner moldings, the trim for the roof is done. Contrary to the first idea, the rear window moldings are glued to the roof and not attached with screws; I had to modify them to be able to install them. I just hope that the sail panels are not too low; if yes, I will have to rework the inner upper quarter molding as I cannot remove the sail panels.

I’m attaching some pictures to show the roof’s trim; you will also notice that the molding on the side of the roof are installed.

 

967 Headliner complete.JPG

968 Headliner complete.JPG

969 Headliner.JPG

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Roger....you have inspired me to start a model of my 1931 Dodge Brothers coupe. They already make a 1931 DG8 coupe, but it is not a DH6 like mine. Even though the body looks the same, there are a lot of differences. Now....where to start on MY model. Here is the DG8 coupe model....

Picture 26215.jpg

Picture 26216.jpg

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Well, it depends what kind of details you intend to make. The most logical start is to made a frame. Maybe you want to do one, or maybe just a simplified base for the body and engine. What is the intended scale and what for material you will use?

 

I don't know if this will be your first scratch built model; if yes, don't go too deeply in the details, you will never finished...If I can be of assistance, let me know!

 

Did you assemble and paint yourself the pictured model? Anyway, it's looking good!

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Guys,

 

Gerald, and Englishman,  is now retired to Spain.  It is much less expensive to live there.  He was here in Carlsbad, CA about 8 or 9 years ago.  He was awarded a lifetime achievement award or Modeler of the decade.  Joe Martin personally hosted him (and I believe his wife too) The guy put out three or four books about his modeling and his methods on how he overcame the obstacles.  He explained and  instructed along the way and made it interesting.  He too, was modeling since his early days.  he just took it to the next level, and then the next.  Like Roger.  There are a few out there, but just a few (that we know of).  

 

Now if I could just get my 1:1 model finished !  I am currently working on my 36 Pontiac Master Six coupe.  I will post engine pictures here pretty soon, Roger.  it has come out beautiful.  My machinist is a whiz.  And a perfectionist. 

 

Randy 

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Logically, once the headliner was installed, I had to install the quarter windows. Sometimes ago, I wrote that I expected difficulties…I’m not disappointed, they are coming! I assume that I never tried the quarter windows with installed roof moldings, what an error…The groove at the roof is not deep enough, not by much: about 0.3 mm (0.01”) would have been enough that the widow is not touching the channel. With 1.5 V, the LH quarter window is stuck in the middle of its travel, either up or down. I tried to modify a bit the roof moldings; I won maybe something, but not enough. What to do? I’m trying with 3 V, which is quadrupling the power. With that boost, no problem the window is going up or down without problem, but much faster!

The RH quarter window is functioning with 1.5 V but very slowly. With 3 V, the window is very quick! I tried to add a resistance but then, with what I have at disposal, the power is marginally increased and not sufficient to overcome the friction.

By using 3 V, I’m faced now with another problem: the bulbs for the parking and tail lamps are for 1.5 V; I will have to either add a resistance to the lamp circuit or an electronic device to have 1.5 V for the lamps. By using 2 1.5 V bulbs in serie this would be OK, but I don’t want to modify what is already built, otherwise it will never be finished.

 

I added a circuit board at each motor to facilitate the soldering of the various wires.

 

The quarter armrests are not yet installed, I can do it once the body is on the frame because some screws are behind the armrest.

 

 

970 installed rear windows.JPG

971 installed rear windows.JPG

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I wish I could be of some help, but electricity has never been much of a talent for me. However, with as much creativity you've employed throughout the build to this point, I'm absolutely certain you'll find a way to forge ahead as if nothing got in your way. I personally am just in awe that the window mechanisms themselves are functional, not to mention electrically operated!

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Roger,

 

You are not kidding about the host of problems that pop up once you go to assembling the different elements of the model.  Getting the motors to work against the resistance and altering the voltage,  that is beyond me.  I would have given up on power windows at that point.  But you are a tenacious craftsman and can always find a solution to the problem in front of you.  That says volumes about your abilities.   And, as they say,   "separates the wheat from the chaff".   We are seeing this Continental coming together right in front of our eyes.  Just amazing.

 

Randy 

 

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Well, Randy, I would shame me if I did all that work and quit when some difficulties are coming...And it's not yet over:

 

As everything was once installed and functioned correctly, I assumed that the RH door would be easy, but it was not. It was like the parts were done for another model…The frame for the vent window was too tall; it was touching the gutter at the roof. Why? I don’t really know as the holes to attach it at the door were the same as previously. Even by scrapping the paint under the gutter was no help, I had to elongate the holes to lower that assembly until it was just no more touching the gutter. Then, the side window was touching the quarter window, no matter how I tried to adjust it. Finally, I had to shorten the window’s frame by almost ½ mm. Once those corrections were done, I noticed that the motor at the window needed more power, therefore the 3 V for the quarter windows are welcome for the front too. Of course, with that tension, the windows are really fast; I prefer that situation as being forced to help them with the fingers…

I assembled the window module to the door with all the needed screws and connected the wires from the arm rest/switch to the ones from the door to test if all was right. The side window still got up and down but the vent window refused to move! The motor was turning, but the clutch was slipping. Once again, everything went out; I did a small rework at the clutch and added some viscous material at it. This time, I was more careful and tested the function and installed the door into the body (to check the clearance) at each new step. The attached picture is showing the final testing for the switches and motors.

 

I assume that the LH door will give the same amount of trouble…

972 Testing the windows.JPG

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Roger,

The pictures here are LARGER than the actual door.  It is amazing that you got all that to fit, and function in such a small package!  IT is strange that when you originally fabricated the windows and the motor drives, they all worked.  Now putting it together, issues pop up that were not there several months ago.  It must be irritating to say the least when all does not go as planed.  What makes the story so good is that you figure out and fix the issue.  

 

I hope that the other door is not as problematic as this one was.  Every day is a new chapter.

 

Randy  

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Well, the other door is not better. The problems are similar but not identical. When all is corrected (I had to modify a chromed part; fortunately, removing the chrome under the roof gutter is barely visible), I was confronted with irregular and jerky up and down movement for the side window. I had this problem before; obviously, the way the electric motor is transmitting the movement is the reason for that. If I had a motor turning fast and moving the window with the adequate reduction, the movement would be linear. In my case, the motor is just revolving about 1/3 of a rotation.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Roger,

i have just come across this build three days ago and like many viewers, amazed by what you are able to achieve. What really does it for me is many of the photos are hard to pick as a model as there is so much correct detail. Many look like some of the restoration photos posted on these  forums.

 

What is more amazing is that the details are in true scale proportion, unlike some models where materials are too heavy or too thick because they are plastic and out of scale. The materials then destroy the realism and the illusion you are trying to create.

 

As a long time dabbler in plastic model kits, model railway and real 1:1 scale Buicks, am in awe of the tiny parts you create. And as a previous owner of a hobby shop, sold many materials that would assist your build such as wire, tube and sheet in brass, copper and aluminium as well as fine DCC decoder wire, styrene, piano wire etc etc that may have made some modules easier to do. We also had number drills, pin vices, files and bits from model aircraft and RC cars that would help.

 

But maybe your aim was to build it ALL ? yourself!

 

 

Am really looking forward to the finished model but at the same time have enjoyed your journey immensely.

 

 And I would always favour the airbrush over a rattle can, so you can add some realistic weathering and grime under the bonnet, wheel arches, fuel filler and the drivers side carpet! ??????

Rodney ( from down under)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Rodney for your comments. Sorry for being late to answer: I was in vacation and somewhat lazy. Even in scale1:18, usually the molding are too thick, probably a necessity to have them strong enough. If I'm doing everything myself is to be sure that the element will fit. I would have been glad to find a side window mechanism less cumbersome that what I finally created. As I hate to search elusive elements, I prefer to do them myself. As you can see, I bought the electric motors!

My models are rendered as like they are in a show room: no dirt, no rust, clean! However, I can understand you point of view...

 

After the usual summer vacation, I’m back. I did however something during these 3 weeks next to cut vegetables: I ordered some decals for the generator, A/C compressor and other ones. They were in the mail when I got back home; they look good!

With a remaining wine case, I did a small box in relation to the model. Do you know for what it’s good? The answer tomorrow!

 

973 decals.JPG

974.JPG

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Exactly! I still have to make the contacts and some hinges for the lid (I throw away some time ago a wood box with hinges...). A defective shaver with his electric cord could also be good for the output cable; I throw away 2 shavers some months ago!

Of course, this box will be external.

 

 

975 battery case.JPG

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And I thought that Roger was going to put a slot in the top and use it as a piggy bank for all those loose quarters he has laying around.  :lol: Hope you had a great time away.  It's always nice to have time to unwind and do nothing. 

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Roger,

 

I hope that France's weather was not too hot for you.  We are experiencing hot, torrid, humid weather pushing up from the South and it is miserable.  And our summer is now just starting.  ?  Plagued with sinus issues it makes for a very uncomfortable time for me.

 

On to better topics.  Roger who did you have make your decals?  Was that a local company?  Did you have to supply them with the pictures of the actual decals or do they have the items in their data base?  I have friends who actually make their own on their ink jet printers but I have not pursued that function on my own.  They look crisp and will make the model really "pop".  

 

Hopefully, after the fitting of the doors, you will not have too many more issues that will be difficult.  It is a good time when we log onto the site and see some more progress being made on the Continental.  

 

Twice a year, our city has a day where you can recycle old electronic items without cost. I just disposed of a computer tower that had some micro wire in it.  Had I known that you could use some of the wire, I would have sent it to you.  I am sure that you have sources for the smaller wire.  It was a waste to get rid of the tower without harvesting the micro wire.  I have a friend who works on computers and he has all kinds of micro wire laying around.  Let me know of the gauge of wire that you are looking for and I will go by his home and get some for you.  Computer wire is the best for electrical but I am sure that you have other sources too.  Just a thought. 


Roger, since you are a master not only with 1:12 scale, but you have years of experience with 1:1 restorations. I will share with you (and the forum members) my journey with my restoration project.

 

I just got my 1936 Pontiac 6 cyl. engine back from the machine shop. It was a TREK tracking down all the parts that I needed for the engine but finally we got them all.  Since I will not be doing the body and chassis for a time, I have built a test stand.  This way I can get the engine running and break it in.  Nothing worse than to put the engine in the car just to find out that there may be an issue and it has to come out again. At my age, I only want to do that ONCE !   Plus, I can get it back to the machine shop for any issues that may arise.  I don't foresee any but you never know.  Better to be safe than sorry later.  

 

  When we are younger,  we can crawl around and under a car without the advancing aches and pains that our bodies present us at the end of the day.  I do what I can do in a day and have to stop knowing that if I don't, I will be miserably sore the next day. No more 18 hour days working bent over or under a car. 

 

 I will post some pics of the engine on the test stand when I get all of the components attached.  It looks pretty damn good if I say so myself.  I have attached a pic of the engine back from the machinist. I am making parts that are not available, like the clutch fork boot.  As time goes on, parts are harder and harder to find.  I am fortunate to have friends that own 36 Pontiacs and have been sourcing parts for years.  They have helped me in my quest.  

 

Randy   

20180705_172118_resized.jpg

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Good looking engine!

To your questions: this is a local company I came across with detour. I had a set of repro decals; I send the guy the set, telling him the scale. For the trunk lid and horn ring ornament, I send him pictures and overall dimensions. He reworked some text that they are still readable. His primary customer base is scale  trucks models. I don't have the equipment to do that myself but, as you noted, it's a nice detail improvement. There is another American guy from a scale model forum who is also involved: he offered to me to do some decals for the dash board; I hope he will send his decals soon!

I got some wires from an electronic shop; it was most probably also some waste from a machine. Unfortunately, those wires were a tad too large in diameter to be used through the doors: they are 0.8 (0.03") mm in diameter; the wires I used are 0.5 mm (0.02"). Anyway, I have enough wires, thanks for the offer!

 

Yesterday, I put some decals at their proper location. One of them came on the trunk lid emblem. Only then, I noticed that I did a major error while I fabricated that assembly; I’m wondering if you will find it. Without the decal, I was not aware of that error. Anyway, I will let that part as is as you really must have the nose on it to see the error.

DSC00463.JPG

DSC00468.JPG

DSC00470.JPG

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Thanks to all who tried to find the error. As just two persons really found it, I will not redo the parts.

Now, the explanation: if you look at the points and lions (or whatever animal), there are 3 in the bottom and only 2 in the upper field. From design, the fields have the same dimensions but I did an error when I fabricated the part: due to the angle from the trunk lid, the horizontal bar from the emblem is not symmetrical for optical reasons. It could be that the edge from the horizontal bar is not in the middle of the emblem, but a tad lower. At the model, the "square" with the decal is also a tad too low compared to the circle, aggravating the situation.

Finally, the decal itself was not done correctly: the space occupied from the cross was neglected. I gave the OK for the decals when I was in vacation and I missed that point too. To be honest, I'm not sure to have catch this error if the proof would have been checked at home.

 

I hope that my explanation can be understood...Foreign language is sometimes difficult...

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Roger,  

 

No one is going to "spot" the error with the trunk emblem.  Even a Ford employee of the day would miss that due to the fact that the whole car - - - er- - - model  has so much detail.  You would have to be the designer on the original Continental to catch that mistake.  It is such a small error in the whole scope of this fine model.  Do not loose any sleep over it as it will go unnoticed to the admiring eye.

 

Randy

 

P.S.  I have the generator and the starter on my bench overhauling them.  after cleaning them up, I  am replacing the bushing in the front and the ball bearing in the rear of the generator shaft.  I have chucked the armature in my lathe and turned down the commutator and am replacing the brushes.  That will make the generator new again.  Plus paint.  Now on to the starter. Same procedure.  Those are much easier than the tasks that you have at hand.  Pictures are to come in the near future.   

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To complete the discussion about the trunk emblem, I put it upside down! The animals are walking at the ceiling...But, like Randy wrote, nobody will notice, that major flaw will be "washed" with the other details from the model. At least, there is no major error at the emblem in the horn ring center. Due to the size, I'm putting 2 pictures, one with and the other without the flash.

979 Horn ring.JPG

980 Horn ring.JPG

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