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BEST TRAILER TIRES????


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There is nothing wrong with Chinese tires.

 

I have used them with success for many years.

 

During that time - interstate road maintenance has gone to hell in a handbag.

 

More road debris = more flat tires and blowouts.

 

Gladiator ST 225/90/R 16 G load range 14 ply are the current tires I use.

 

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...

The Ocala Winter National trip was expensive as busted all four of the trailer's Goodyear Marathons(Chinese made) plus a "Loadstar" (Chinese).   Oh the Goodyears were 4 years old.  Friends towed same mileage on Goodyear Endurance (USA) no issues.  No issues observed by the TPMS screen.

Robert

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  • 10 months later...
On 12/6/2017 at 7:49 AM, Trulyvintage said:

Good news for those looking for an American made trailer tire .... 

 

Starting earlier this year Goodyear introduced an American Made ST Trailer Tire.

@ https://corporate.goodyear.com/en-US/media/news/goodyear_launches_american_manufactured_trailer_tire.html 

I buy my at Discount Tire/America's Tire Store because they offer free replacement certificates that are not based on pro-rated tire tread

 

I have been running them all year long on my triple axle 34 foot enclosed car hauler trailer

Jim 
 

Now if Michelin would only make em!

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On 5/28/2009 at 1:05 AM, Marty Roth said:

Charlier,

Your inspection technician isn't entirely wrong, but he did over-simplify in my opinion.

The fact is that, having done ALL the right things with regard to loading, pressure, maintenance, etc., my less-than-one-year-old trailer with 6000lb axles and new Load-Range E tires blew the inside sidewalls on three of the first five tires (I bought new Michelins before the other 2 had a chance to blow). This was on our first two trips, and I check air pressure at 80psi EVERY MORNING. One of them blew overnight, splitting a sidewall in the driveway; another Popped Very Loudly, also splitting the sidewall in 10mph traffic during a hurricane evacuation.

What these DEFECTIVE tires had in common was that they were ALL MADE IN CHINA -- IRONMAN brand, which I was told is a Carlisle sub-brand -- they are 235/85-R16 LR"E".

"Buy-American" isn't such bad advice -- it might even save your life as well as your job.

If they don't have ST in the beginning of the size they are not trailer tires.

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5 hours ago, 64SportFury426 said:

If they don't have ST in the beginning of the size they are not trailer tires.

 

 
  On 5/28/2009 at 12:05 AM, Marty Roth said:

Charlier,

Your inspection technician isn't entirely wrong, but he did over-simplify in my opinion.

The fact is that, having done ALL the right things with regard to loading, pressure, maintenance, etc., my less-than-one-year-old trailer with 6000lb axles and new Load-Range E tires blew the inside sidewalls on three of the first five tires (I bought new Michelins before the other 2 had a chance to blow). This was on our first two trips, and I check air pressure at 80psi EVERY MORNING. One of them blew overnight, splitting a sidewall in the driveway; another Popped Very Loudly, also splitting the sidewall in 10mph traffic during a hurricane evacuation.

What these DEFECTIVE tires had in common was that they were ALL MADE IN CHINA -- IRONMAN brand, which I was told is a Carlisle sub-brand -- they are 235/85-R16 LR"E".

"Buy-American" isn't such bad advice -- it might even save your life as well as your job.

 
 
Thank you for your expertise, and yes, we're well aware that if they don't have the ST prefix, they're not trailer tires -
but that is not always a negative, in my opinion-
Some (quality) truck tires actually function better and more dependably on trailers than designated trailer tires - as evidenced by my personal experience, generally trailering in excess of 10,000 miles annually, and sometimes much more.
 
In  fact, the original IRONMAN 235/85R-16 which were delivered on my custom built all aluminum car hauler - the ones you appear to have noted from my nearly 12-year-old post
are actually ST235/85R-16 LRE TRAILER TIRES, (I simply quoted the size, not mentioning the "ST" at the time of that very old post). 
The IRONMANs were Made in China as a believed sub-brand of Carlisle, and as previously noted, were PURE DANGEROUS JUNK, as evidenced by the first three Blowing Out in short order. 
The "surprises" were despite the relatively new Date Codes, daily inspection for 80 psi pressure, and for condition. I kept the other two as evidence of what not to buy. 
 
I have generally used Michelin LT235/85R-18 LRE since that time, with full knowledge that they are Light Truck Tires - NOT Trailer Tires, 
and have been Fully Satisfied with the quality, the Service, and the fact that I replace them based upon age rather than simply wear.
Since last year, and upon the suggestion of Edinmass (above), I bought a set of Sailun (yes, made in China) - no problems so far!
 
 

The SAILUN tires I use, suggested by edinmass ,are Load Range "G"

 

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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I run 14 ply ST 16 inch trailer tires made in China.

 

I pull a 35 foot enclosed trailer every day.

 

I have never had a blow out.

 

There is a Wannabe Hauler who boasts about running passenger car tires on his car hauler trailer

because they last a long time - but he has no insurance and does stop at weigh stations.

 

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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I run the best tire I can find........rated for 4400 pounds..........and it weighs twice what a Goodyear does.......I have 75k on mine, and I haul heavier than almost anyone in the car hobby with big cars............I stil have more than 60 percent tread. Tire is 145.00. It’s the only thing in China that’s well made. All steel casement. Basically a 16 inch tractor trailer tire....Sailun S637 trailer only tire.

80CBD0E7-F48B-4D7A-B6D7-DC17FFDF9E18.png

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37 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I run the best tire I can find........rated for 4400 pounds..........and it weighs twice what a Goodyear does.......I have 75k on mine, and I haul heavier than almost anyone in the car hobby with big cars............I stil have more than 60 percent tread. Tire is 145.00. It’s the only thing in China that’s well made. All steel casement. Basically a 16 inch tractor trailer tire....Sailun S637 trailer only tire.

 

Hopefully someday Sailun will make a tire that fits my trailer. Until then, I will keep buying MAXXIS M8008 ST tires for my trailer.

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15 hours ago, charlier said:

 

Hopefully someday Sailun will make a tire that fits my trailer. Until then, I will keep buying MAXXIS M8008 ST tires for my trailer.

 

 I am currently running the Maxxis M8008s myself & got 95,000 on the enclosed trailer with the last set. I was very disappointed in the Goodyear Endurance tires, got only half that mileage on a set of those. I loved the Marathons, never had an issue with them. However since I run 120-155k per year, they didn't sit around dry rotting. Before those I ran more than a decade with Yokahama LT tires & never had any problems with them either. I have been blessed to not have had any issues with tires over my 36+ year career of being a transporter. Part of that is because I don't buy cheapo trailers & my stuff always stays inside my heated building when not in use ( I am not homeless) & I am anal about maintenance & doing all my work myself I know what I am doing. 

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  • 1 year later...

The last post here is over a year old so I am looking for a little more up todate information. Just back from a 4,700 mile trip with our 24' inclosed car trailer. Had a rear spring bracket break which caused the rear tire to blow (the roads in some states are REALLY hard on equipment}. NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) came out a few years ago with the recommendation that any tire 7 years or older be replaced. As my tires are now 6 years old and have 25,000 miles on them,  I am looking to replace all. Current tires are 16" load range E and are marked "Trailfinder HT" made by Discount Tire. I don't see where they were made and it looks like they are no longer stocking the ST.  Looking at Les Schwab's Geostar load range G. They claim these tires are made in California but looking on line it looks like they are made in China. 

Does anyone have current experience/recommendations for ST tires?

Thanks

Edited by kbeach
typo (see edit history)
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Buy Saulin trailer tires. All steel casement, the run 110 psi. Change out your stems. The tires are good for 80-100k.

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  • 1 month later...

I run Goodyear 16" load range "G" tires on my 2010 Featherlite which is what it came with, it has 6000 lbs axles.  I had about 60,000 miles on when it was 10 years old.  Even though the tires had lots of tread left on them I replaced all 4 because of the age.  My brother is running my old tires on his farm pickup now.  These tires are about $350.00 each but I have (knock on wood) never had a blow out or a flat.  If I bought anything with Chinese tires on it I would swap them out from new.  The damage done to the trailer and possibly the car you are hauling makes the tire seem cheap. 

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  • 7 months later...
On 10/14/2017 at 1:51 PM, Yoda said:

I change out the tires on any trailer I buy, especially an enclosed trailer, and run MAXXISS tires on them.  I haven't had any problems with them. A couple years ago I bought a 28 ft enclosed trailer and immediately bought a set of Maxxiss for it.  The tires on the new trailer were load range D, barely acceptable for a 10,000 lb rated trailer.  Load range E Maxxiss installed, better trailer manners, no blow outs, needless to say, I am happy.

I have always used Maxxiss and never had an issue. 

IMG_2709.jpg

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On 2/21/2019 at 3:31 PM, Trulyvintage said:

There is nothing wrong with Chinese tires.

It is the specifications tires are built that determines safety, utility, and other features to the motorist. Where and who builds the tire is not what determines quality. If we, the American contractor, give the Chinese specs and price points and loose quality control then we get what we deserve. My nephew, an RPI Engineer graduate with advanced degree works for Duracell Battery. Duracell had a plant in China. I asked my nephew about the Chinese manufacturing practices for Duracell battery. Nephew said the Chinese will build exactly as you specify. Nephew went on to say if you give the Chinese leeway on a spec the Chinese will maximize cost savings for them on the spec.

My feelings are we have to be investigative buyers to make best informed decision on our purchases. My go to tire for my drivers are Michelin Defender tires. My utility trailer tires are inexpensive high load rated tires.

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On 8/29/2021 at 5:36 PM, Avanti Bill said:

The damage done to the trailer and possibly the car you are hauling makes the tire seem cheap. 

What you say makes all the sense in the world. I’m not defending any tire manufacturer or country when I say it is the specs the tire is made is what defines quality. Admittedly, I cannot pinpoint any tire that had superior specs based on where they are built. I prefer Michelin tires for my drivers based on experience not specs. It very well could be the specs from Chinese tires are weaker than others. I’ve heard some name brand American tires are made in China. We are lucky we have so many choices in America.

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On 1/24/2020 at 5:21 PM, 64SportFury426 said:

If they don't have ST in the beginning of the size they are not trailer tires.

My Dad said during WWII tires were hard to get. When a farm truck tire blew he would make a “ boot” out of another failed tire and put the boot inside the failed tire to get going again. I’m thinking today tire specifications and age are key to safety and durability. If Chinese tires have the same specs as American tires should they not perform the same? Could be tire manufacturers cheat on specs and that is criminal.

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On 7/19/2021 at 9:43 PM, edinmass said:

Buy Saulin trailer tires. All steel casement, the run 110 psi. Change out your stems. The tires are good for 80-100k.

Having experienced multiple tread separations on the original Chinese Load Range "E" tires,

I replaced all trailer tires with Michelins , as I've done for more than 60 years on our regular vehicles. 

 

A few years ago I followed Ed's advice and got Load Range "G" Sailun tires, mounted on our 6,000 lb axles for our trailer and have had excellent results so far.

Overkill for sure !

Of course our travel was reduced the past two years, but time will tell.

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18 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

Having experienced multiple tread separations on the original Chinese Load Range "E" tires,

I replaced all trailer tires with Michelins , as I've done for more than 60 years on our regular vehicles. 

 

A few years ago I followed Ed's advice and got Load Range "G" Sailun tires, mounted on our 6,000 lb axles for our trailer and have had excellent results so far.

Overkill for sure !

Of course our travel was reduced the past two years, but time will tell.


 

You can never go overkill on trailer equipment or tires. Everyone who has ever seen a Sailun off the rim is impressed……..it weighs in twice to three times the banana peels from China. I’m at 80k on my first set, and they look like they are about 60 percent worn.

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It is time for me to replace the tires on my trailer.

Unfortunately, Sailun still does not make a tire for those of us that need a 15 inch tire.

Too bad. I wish they would help those of us out that need a smaller size tire.

 

Oh well I guess it is another set of Maxxis M8008 Plus Load Range D tires for me. 

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I transport every day.

I run 16 inch ST tires on my trailer.

If you run a 16 inch tire you are

not limited to a 10 ply or E load 

range tire.

I run a 14 ply all steel G load range

highway tread tire.

I keep them inflated to 100 psi.

I rotate and balance them 

front to back and side to side.

 

Jim

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Regardless of whether you like 

it or not - we live and work

in a global economy.

 

I run Chinese tires on my truck

and trailer - have been doing

it for years.

 

Just like I install replacement parts

on my Ford F-350 Crew Cab PSD

Dually Pick Up Truck

that I tow every day with

which are made in:

 

China

Mexico

Vietnam

Taiwan

 

And other Countries.

 

If you don’t want to buy

tires made in China

maybe you should 

drive this …. 
 

6FEEE8C8-6D8A-47A9-B22E-79FC27F7633D.jpeg.5270f3f0bd507a52a44027653a850bb2.jpeg

 

For those high dollar Maxxis tire buyers

read where your tires are actually made:

 

https://www.maxxis.com/us/about-maxxis/

 

 

Jim

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5 hours ago, Trulyvintage said:

For those high dollar Maxxis tire buyers

read where your tires are actually made:

 

https://www.maxxis.com/us/about-maxxis/

 

 

Jim

Thanks Jim... I have known since the beginning where Maxxis tires are made. My last set were made in Thailand and I have no trouble with that. Before the Maxxis tires I had Goodyear Marathons (Made in the USA) that didn't last 3 years before they had issues even though I ALWAYS keep my tires PROPERLY inflated and COVERED when not being used. When Goodyear would not stand behind their product I decided to take my business elsewhere. Way back when, the original tires that came on my trailer were made in China and I got many miles out of them before they age out for me. 

 

BTW, I also know where Sailun tires are made as well. It is obvious from this thread that where they are made does not matter to those here who buy them since they are a well made tire.

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13 hours ago, charlier said:

It is time for me to replace the tires on my trailer.

Unfortunately, Sailun still does not make a tire for those of us that need a 15 inch tire.

Too bad. I wish they would help those of us out that need a smaller size tire.

 

Oh well I guess it is another set of Maxxis M8008 Plus Load Range D tires for me. 

Charlie,

 

Are you able to upgrade your trailer to a 16" rim on the same bolt pattern?

Might be a good long term approach-

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Sailun are made in China, but they are the best 16 inch tire on the market.....so, to be fair......only 99.8 percent of manufactured products from China are junk. I run the best product I can find.....price is about number ten on my list of things for tires. Since I run heavy cars......V-12 Packards, Model J's, ect........I want the best tire regardless of cost or origin. I also use a triple axel spread........the best set up for safety......but it sure adds huge amounts of money to the cost of towing and service. If I was running a commercial rig......for economics and competition I would just run a regular dual set up. 

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On 4/6/2022 at 9:38 AM, Marty Roth said:

Charlie,

 

Are you able to upgrade your trailer to a 16" rim on the same bolt pattern?

Might be a good long term approach-

Marty,

 

Unfortunately (for me) going from my current 15 inch trailer tires to 16 inch trailer tires involves multiple challenges.

 

First, my trailer currently has a 5 bolt pattern on it's 3500lb Dexter Torsion axles. From what I have seen most 16 inch wheels use either a 6 or 8 bolt pattern. (Strike One)

 

Next, the differences between 15 inch and 16 inch tires when it comes to Diameter (+3.7") Sidewall (+1.3") and width (+1.2")  present one or more challenges when it come to fitting in the wheel wells of my trailer. (Strike Two)

 

Then there is the cost of 6 new, 16inch wheels. (Strike Three)

 

Sadly, for my situation, there are just too many things working against me using the Sailun tires. It would be much easier and less costly (for me) if Sailun just made a 15 inch tire. That obviously is not going to happen if they have not made one by now and I am okay with that.

 

 

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You guy's have enlightened me on these Sailun trailer tires. My Goodyear Marathons are now 7 years old on my 22ft 2015 ATC (aluminum) trailer and I was going to try a set of the Goodyear Endurance but now not sure. I have NEVER had a problem with a trailer tire in over 45 years, blowout etc.  I have always maintained proper air pressure and bought the best trailer tire I could find.  AND, I guess I have replaced them earlier than I should have?? I have always feared the possibilty of a blowout on say any interstate so I guess I have been overly cautious if that's possible?  

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On 2/20/2019 at 11:18 AM, edinmass said:

Avoid all tires made in China except the Sailun’s they are fantastic. 

Which model do you use? It looks like they have car and truck tires, but no trailer tires, based on their web site.

Thanks.

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I talked to my tire guy about Chinese tires. His remarks were The US DOT establishes specifications for tires sold in this country. He went on to say tires have their strong points and not so strong points. The tire store believes you should prioritize your needs in your tires. For instance stopping power, handling on wet roads, etc are some characteristics you could look for. I really never gave it much thought. The man went on to say if you keep the tires in a garage, dry, and out of the all day sun you are better off.

Turbinator

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5 hours ago, Turbinator said:

I talked to my tire guy about Chinese tires. His remarks were The US DOT establishes specifications for tires sold in this country. He went on to say tires have their strong points and not so strong points. The tire store believes you should prioritize your needs in your tires. For instance stopping power, handling on wet roads, etc are some characteristics you could look for. I really never gave it much thought. The man went on to say if you keep the tires in a garage, dry, and out of the all day sun you are better off.

Turbinator

Sorry, but some tire guys sound like the archtypical salesman, selling his line of profit.

A salesman is a salesman -

I know because I was a Director of several sales teams, and had to DEPROGRAM sales managers and their representatives at one time.

Yours just may be the angelic exception, but many are not!

 

Does he sell Chinese tires? Maybe he has to sell them?

Better to talk with a tire engineer, or to look at actual results!

 

Not every tire, and especially Chinese tires, actually live up to what they claim to be, per their stated specification.

 

I'm pleased with my Sailun Chinese tires. 

My Ironman Chinese tires came close to killing me, and maybe others on the highway.

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My Sailun are 235/85R-16 LRG (Load Range "G")

I bought them online from Simple Tire -Shipping is FREE !

https://simpletire.com/

 

https://simpletire.com/tire-sizes/235-85r16?brand=Sailun $205.96 for Load Range "G" - a Trailer Tire

 

Their Load Range "E" is a light truck tire @ $172.00

 

Hope this helps

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

years ago in the 70s when usa steel belted radial tires first came out and ever since then I’ve seen failures especially of the belt separating from the rest of the tire. I have no argument that they are a better tire in handling, tread life and safety IF the tire does not deconstruct.

 

bias ply tires (or rag tires) may not last as long in tread life, may not give us good fuel mileage, but when they do come apart it’s usually not a catastrophic failure and the damage usually minor at worst. USUALLY NO DAMAGE. and bias tires seem to last many years longer… because the only steel in them are the beads! you can use them far longer! (and in theory they should cost far less.)

 

i had a open steel car trailer for over 15 years and ran the original stock rag tires until almost bald. replaced them with inexpensive steel belted trailer tires and experienced many belt failures.  i don’t think i ever wore one out to the wear bars. a lot of the radial belt failures i caught before actual total separation. doing inspection often when towing. lug nuts, tire pressure, and even putting on thin gloves and feeling the tire tread and sidewalls. 

 

bottom line. imo… bias tires are better especially on a trailer. (and i prefer bias car tires on old cars that don’t get driven much…)

Edited by mrspeedyt (see edit history)
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