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Econovanman

BEST TRAILER TIRES????

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I am looking at having a 24' 10,400gvw enclosed trailer built to haul our 1957 Chevy and 1965 Mustang around, and using a 15" tire by the way of ST22575R15, on a 6 lug 15" aluminum wheel.

I have read some on the tires that are available for this, and think that everyone feels that the GOODYEAR MARATHON load range D is the best one to run.......any comments or suggestions??

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I have had much better luck with Carlisles.</div></div>

I put 4 brand new E rated Carlisle tires on my trailer. They were well within load limit and inflated properly. 2 of them literaly blew apart within the first 1000 miles. The dealer took the other two off and gave me full credit towards 4 other tires. The Carlisles were made in China. Personally I wouldn't use them to start a brush pile burning. Don't mean to offend others who have had good luck but that was my experiance.......Bob

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I agree with Bob, Carlisle tires are junk. I had a blow out with my 22' trailer a few years ago on the New Jersey turnpike going the speed limit. By the grace of God and some limited driving skills I got it under control and pulled over.

Carlisle would not do a thing for me until I had my lawyer send them a letter. The dealer then gave me four new General tires. I asked why not carlisles and he said off the record they were having problems with them. No problems since.

Dave Birchmire,Sr.

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Well fellows, I have experienced the same thing you guys have. I bought a new enclosed trailer some years ago and experienced no tire problems the first couple years. Then, the trailer set for a good while. Probably 5 years later, I made a 450 mile trip up north and blew out every tire on the trailer. I don't drive slow, but by the end of the first leg of the trip, I had slowed down to 50 mph on the interstate, a traffic hazard, if there ever was one. eek.gif

Two years later, I'm starting to have problems with the replacement tires. Age is the killer! I spoke with my "Big Truck" dealer and we decided that the best bet is to get the highest load range tire possible for my particular wheels.

Even so, my next trailer will have the heaviest axles available with the biggest wheel tire combination. I'm getting tired of changing trailer tires. My big truck never blows out a tire.

Wayne

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Wayne, just wondering if the trailer tires that blew out on you sat in the sun for the 5 years you mentioned?

Between towing trips my trailer sits in my driveway and gets the morning and afternoon sun.

A few years ago I decided to invest in tire covers like you often see used on RVs for my car trailer and tow vehicle.

I'm not saying that sun is the cause for all the tire failures but it could be a contributing factor in some cases.

BTW, does anyone have any input on the number of years or amount of miles that trailer tires typically last?

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Hi Guys,

My big new all-aluminum hauler (24ft box, slant & tapered nose, 30ft overall, pair of 6,000 lb axles) came with 235/85-R16 Load Range E tires. The tires are ALWAYS protected from the sun with covers.

Within the first year, 3 of the four tires on the ground suffered BLOW-OUTS -- all with interior sidewall letting go -- and I always check my tire pressure - every trip, and usually every morning.

You guessed it -- all of the tires on this new trailer, including the spare were "MADE IN CHINA" -- so far, Forest River has not committed to replace these tires -- of course I bought new tires just to complete the trip (4 new B.F. Goodrich, and one MESA (only thing I could find at the Tire kingdom at the time).

Along with the other warranty repairs Forest River should be doing, I expect that they will see the wisdom of covering the replacement of these DANGEROUS CHINESE IMPORTED TIRES, and that they will deliver their trailers with better quality tires SO THAT NO ONE WILL BE INJURED !!!!!

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Just sharing this note:

For trailer application, it is essential that you select the correct tires to match your application and capacity requirements. (ST) Special Trailer tires are normally more expensive than (P) Passenger car or (LT) Light Truck tires because they are built tougher with more material and are more bruise resistant. This is necessary because most trailer suspension systems are stiffer and less sophisticated than automotive suspension systems. Consequently the tires must be capable of withstanding more ABUSE.

It is also important to chedk the manufacture dates because some trailer tires may sit on the shelf for a long time....

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Thanks all!!!! Great info here!!!! and I believe the general idea is that one should stay away from any tire, be it car, truck, or trailer that is made in China!!

Around where I live there is limited availability on trailer tires, I CAN get Goodyear Marathons at Sam's (special order) and "some" off/private label brands from the likes of Tire Kingdom, Tires Plus, and the like....

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Just my opinion from years of pulling boat trailers with 3500# boats on them.

If you log on to the Pathfinder Boats, (MPH),Maverick Hews, Pathfinder, web site and do a search, you will find lengthly discussions on the best trailer tire. More discussions than you want to read.

By far the Maxxis is the best. Thats what I have now on a slightly overloaded, single axle, trailer hauling a 22ft Pathfinder boat with gas and a bunch (too much) gear.

These tires wear fantastic also. Just keep them inflated correctly. Most problems come from people not keeping a close eye on tire pressures. Under is as bad as over.

Bill H

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<span style="font-family: 'Arial Black'"><span style="color: #990000">Speaking from experience here ....

I travel all over the country and have purchased many sizes - brands - types of 15" tires.

I decided on 7.00 x 15 size in an 'E' load range several years ago.

They fit nicely on 6" wide trailer rims.

Right now I am running steel belted 7.00 x 15 highway tread tires which I tracked down thru a wholesale distributor in Houston, TX for $70 each.

Because I buy a minimum of (8) trailer tires at a time and run them 30K miles before changing them - I go thru a few sets a year.

The two biggest factors that shorten tire life are speed and shelf life.

Towing faster than 55 -60 m.p.h. builds up heat that destroys a tire from the inside out.

Tires older than 4 or 5 years should be discarded - between UV damage and normal aging they are not safe to run.

A tire dealer will sometimes sell you a tire this old that he has in stock - check the DOT code on the inner sidewall (usually) that contains the year and month of manufacture.

Finally, there is nothing wrong with tires made in China - I am running them right now and have used them for years without incident.</span></span>

post-56761-143138054274_thumb.jpg

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> The two biggest factors that shorten tire life are speed and shelf life.

Towing faster than 55 -60 m.p.h. builds up heat that destroys a tire from the inside out.</div></div>

Jim, here's my beef. That towing faster than 60mph gets my goat. I don't drive my big trucks that slow, why should I drive my trailer towing unit that slow? If the manufacturers can make highway heavy haulers that will run 70-75 all day long, loaded to the hilt in 100 degree days, why can't they make car transport tires this way? Is it because we put up with this? Seems like every trip I make with my tow rig, I have to change a trailer tire. It's getting a little old. I'm looking for options and price is not a consideration. confused.gif

Wayne

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Jim, Obviously you are much much more experianced towing than I am but I must question why half of my fresh Chinese Carlisles literally EXPLODED in less than 1000 miles of use. Especially since they were E rated and WAY under loaded, The pressures were spot on, and they were cool days. True I was towing at the speed limit of 65 but I just can't beleive the difference between 60 and 65 means not EXPLODE or EXPLODE.

I imagine there must be some good Chinese made cheap s**t out there that's not painted with lead paint, contaminated with melamine, or produced with near slave labor but in my book tires just ain't one of them..........Bob

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Bob, is this where the statement..."When things are built right, they will be built in America?"....comes in?

Assuming we still have factories to build them. smile.gif

Wayne

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Hey Wayne,Usually towed the race trailer at least 70mph,NEVER an issue always used Michelin radials,checked tire pressure daily.That was 15 years ago.diz

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> When things are built right, they will be built in America?"....comes in?

</div></div>

There are a lot of really good foreign goods out there, Wayne. Think German machinery, Japanese high tech, French aircraft. But you get what you pay for. The concept of cheap quality is a total oxymoron. The sad part is the U.S.A. and it's people are capable of designing and making the best there is of anything you can name. But we buy the cheapest s**t we can get and send our jobs out of the country. No, I don't know how to fix this.........Bob

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Bob, is it possible that the tires you purchased had, in fact, been made well before you bought them?

If you still have any of those tires how do their dates of manufacture (ie birth date) compare to the date you bought them?

Is it possible that your tires were not stored properly by the distributor or dealer?

See #s 1-8 in this article: http://www.motor.com/magazine/pdfs/092008_03.pdf

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I don't have the 2 that didn't EXPLODE the dealer took them back. Of the 2 that EXPLODED there was nothing left of them except the beads on the rim and large pieces scattered along the hiway. So I can't say when they were manufactured. I can say that I bought them from a very active tire dealership, not a mom & pop type operation where they sat in the back shed for 10 years. And don't forget they were "E" rated and were way under loaded.

That being said, I don't doubt for a minute that tires deteriorate over time. I further beleive that the 7 0r 8 year life being touted by tire dealers might be true for tires stored in the sun and elements. I would bet the farm that tires stored inside in a climate controlled environment are NOT going to "go bad" in such a short time.

It's only anecdotal evidence but the tires on my Corvette, which is stored inside and sees little use or sunlite, are 20 years old and show no signs of deterioration.

Are they weaker than new? No doubt. But they haven't EXPLODED either.............Bob

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We're running Carlisle tires on our rental trailers with no problems but the way our customers abuse the tires they don't last long enough to go bad from age. Imagine a trailer rated to carry 1000lbs loaded to the top with broken cement or gravel or sand or whatever being pulled at 70+ mph and bumped over curbs or dirt roads or any of a hundred other road hazards and you can see why they don't last. We check tire pressure after every rental and replace any bruised or damaged tires immediatly. If a tire lasts a year on my trailers they are old timers. The tires on my equipment trailers usually last about 2 years barring any unforeseen accidents. They go out almost everyday loaded with tractors or skid steers or scissor lifts, heavy stuff. Speed and careless driving are the biggest enemies of my tires. The Carlisle tires hold up as good as any other brand.

Harry

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I'm wondering if there is something here that we're not looking at the right way - is a radial tire really a good trailer tire? I'm just thinking out loud here so don't start tossing rocks yet, but it seems to me that trailer tires do a lot more squirming than passenger car tires do. there simply is a lot more stress on sidewalls when used for trailering. Since the tread portion of the tire is held firmly by the steel threads in a radial tire, all the abuse must be absorbed by those thinner sidewalls, which are more susceptible to the ravages of UV, heat, pressure fluctuations, load shifts, etc. I've seen radial trailer tires blow apart at the side wall and leave the tread completely intact. Wouldn't a bias-ply tire provide a bit more "cushion" for trailering use? I don't think you can buy a bias-ply tire anymore so was wondering if the reason we see so many trailer tire failures is because the radial concept just doesn't work well for this purpose??? Don't know, just wondering. And, if anyone cares, I did a lot of research on the internet before buying my Goodyear Marathons.

Terry

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> We're running Carlisle tires on our rental trailers with no problems </div></div> Hard to argue with sucess. I have to go to my tire dealer today to replace a 20,000 mile Good Year on my Durango that has a ply seperation. Not sure what it will cost me but I'm sure it won't be a free replacement. Maybe I just got a "bad batch" of Carlisles but for me it's "once burned twice shy.".......Bob

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Guest Trunk Rack

I run several trailers with 15" wheels. All "three axle". My experience down thru the years is that there is NO PREDICTABILITY as to failure rates. You name the place where the tire was made, and I will give you examples of HORRIBLY BAD tires that failed catastrophically, and ALSO give you examples of tires that served well. INCLUDING CHINESE MADE ! So I have nothing to add to the discussion about WHERE a tire is made, as to predicting how well it will serve you.

I CAN say that I prefer RADIALS. As others have noted, ALL OTHER THINGS BEING EQUAL, traditional American-style/bias style sidewalls are stronger, and should handle abuse better than the much thinner side-wall radials.

Trouble with that is, all things are NOT equal. Then we add into the equation HEAT. Again, as others in here have noted, heat is a tire-killer. Keep the heat down, and the tire has a better chance of surviving.

My experience is that GOOD radials (and again, I have NO idea how to predict which tire, which manufacturer, or where the manufacturer is located, is going to serve you) is that they run SO much cooler. I WISH I could buy American-made tires, but non of our local suppliers have any. It is my suspicion that the Chinese are wising up and improving their tire quality.

Bottom line - all I can offer you is GOOD LUCK !

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