ron hausmann

Kissel 1918 Sedanette

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David,

Yes this is the "cobra long grain" as sold by snyders. It looks just great and matches what i have on several other cars.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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All,

Making progress again. Here are some pictures of unit as of July 10, 2017. Right now, we are in the assembly phase;

1) Engine and engine accessories have been delivered to St. Claire Engine, who has rebuilt many Kissel Six engines successfully for me. ETA on completed engine is November, 2017.

2) Hard top from prior postings has has a complete new top mounted and its now trimmed and complete.

3) Body aprons, Doors, and Complete Body Tub have been painted professionally by Detroit Deluxe.

4) Assembly of Body on to rolling chassis has started. Illl post pictures in a month when done.

Kissels were factory ordered, either using their stock black or navy colors, or "optional" colors - whatever you wanted - according to period advertisements. So i chose this blue grey color so that it would work if the car is configured either as a four-passenger Sedanlette Roadster with a tan convertible top, or as a Sedanlette Sedan with its pictured black removeable hard top. 

Now the fun stuff begins!

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Very nice, all that body work detail formed the base to a wonderful paint job.   This was always fantastic car, now it will be a fantastically gorgeous car. :)

 

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All,

The body has been lifted onto and bolted to the rolling chassis. I did it alone with levers, an engine hoist, and variable height work horses. amazing what a lever and patience can accomplish.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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All - Mated the newly upholstered top to the chassis and body yesterday and today using the rigging shown. Fitment is great.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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All,

As of August 15th, 2017 the assembly of the car body is proceeding well. Fitment of doors and door anchors are better in fact than I expected. Also found that smartly engineered shims under the body bolts really make the doors match perfectly. The pictures below show the left and right door uppers and lowers mounted, the trunk lid attached, the new rear seat springs fitted, and the floor boards re-attached. Now just waiting for the fenders from my bodywork expert and the Kissel 6-38 engine.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 10:24 PM, alsancle said:

hursst - This is the only Kissel Sedanlette or Sedane' that survived. it was only made from late 1916 thru 1918 and few were ever sold to begin with. it is the immediate ancestor of the 1919-1927 Kissel Gold Bug.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

+1

 

9. 1918 Kissel Sedanette Brochure.JPG

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All,

    Sorry for the long silence. We built a large home in 2017 and have just moved in. Accordingly my restoration hobby had to take a backseat to my house construction project and helping my wife thru the unending selection process that's attendant to building a large house. Now we are moved in and I'm back finishing this 1918 Kissel restoration!

    Below are pictures of the 1918 Kissel's front apron and rear fenders. The Kissel aprons on these "Hundred Point Six" cars were of two styles - sloped for early ones from 1916-1917, and straight for 1917 and 1918's. At least that's what I deduce from parts cars and pictures.

    We made NEW rear fenders instead of repairing the old ones. Easier to do as opposed to trying to unbend a hundred years of kinks and brazing on the old ones.

    Now we are working on the Front fenders and finishing the mighty Kissel 6-38 engine.

   Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

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All,

Have fitted the rear fenders and drilled and bracketed them in place. Also have fitted the rear fender internal skirts which separate the interior of the wheel wells from the passenger compartments.

With these old mandrel English-Wheel fenders, you, create the fender itself and then hand-fit them into place from running board, wood-screw by wood-screw, towards the back and then adjust the rear fender brackets to suit. Then you "square-off" the fenders and the flush lines with the running boards using the main brackets. This stretches the metal to some degree. I'm letting them sit and stretched for awhile before I dismount them and take them to the painter. 

This is a lot of tedious work but gratifying when you get them dead even and square with the body and running boards.

Front fenders are next !

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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Went to my machine shop today to drop off some parts for my 31’ Chevy engine and the owner showed me a beautiful Kissel engine they have just finished. They’re waiting on a grommet for something but I can’t remember exactly what. Not your motor,is it? 

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christech -

Nope, my engine helper is St. Claire Engine in Armada, Michigan. He's done 4Kissel engines for me.

RON

1923 Kissel Sedan Engine 7-11-13 (2).jpg

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Christchurch,

Kissel made their own L-head six cylinder engines completely, from 1916 thru 1925. Bore and stroke changed but engine was the same, or almost. Everything Kissel made. So if you need parts you either have several parts cars available, like I do, or you make old ford tractor parts fit. Usually I have found modern aluminium Pistons and titanium rods of proper dimensions to replace the internals. The engines then crank a lot better when they are not dragging around all that old cast iron.

im assuming what you saw was a 1922 six cylinder - there is a person in NH who is restoring one.

thanks, Ron 

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Hi Ron,

found out that the Kissel engine I saw was for a restoration shop in FL. Didn’t get the name of the shop.

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All,

Ok. Getting close. Here are the new front fenders being checked for fitment, prior to going to the painter. I'm using a Detroit hot rod shop to do the painting of large parts and they are doing a wonderful job.

After I Get all the fenders and trim back from the painters, I ,merely have to mount the engine which is being overhauled by st. Claire Engine, and do upholstery in leather.

close!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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