ron hausmann

Kissel 1918 Sedanette

Recommended Posts

All,

Thought that i would post up pictures of the "Shed-find" 1918 Kissel Model 6-38 Sedanette which I picked up yesterday. It had been stored for decades with thousands of other things in 5 sheds in the middle of New York. All the fenders, lights, engine, trim are there but not pictured. According to the National Kissel registry, this car is the only known 1918 Kissel Sedanette that exists. The Kissel Sedanette was a Roadster bodied car with a convertible top (not pictured) which then could be removed and a wood enclosed-car top easily put on for Winter. It worked yesterday because the car was too high to fit into my enclosed trailer.

The 1918 Kissel Sedanette was the immediate precursor to the new 1919 Kissel Gold Bug Models.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

post-58797-14314216901_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142169023_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142169033_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic find, Kissel always made an interesting car. This is a unique body style, that's "convertible" for the seasons. Many early high end cars came with two bodies, an open one for the spring/summer, a closed one for the winter/fall, and if you were well enough off to own such a car, then you could hire (or had on the payroll!) people to change the bodies. Actually, if you think about it, if the cars were made correctly to do that, it's not that big a job....

Congrats on a great find...I'm constantly amazed at the number of cars still out there, but it's a big, big country!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trimacar is correct - the whole carved wood top can be taken off at the belt line,vand a convertible top with top bows installed. You can't see it here, but we got all of the bows, top portholes, both windshields - the one for the wood top and the slant one for the convertible, and all the fenders and trim. We have Kissel model 6-38 engine number 38-4631 with the car. That's why this is really a good, complete find.

i will post pictures of parts later.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Motoring icons,

no way can this be ready for St. Johns in 2014. I have a full time engineering career for a few years yet, so this one, like the 1923 Kissel Brougham Sedan, will have to be done the occasional night and weekend. Probably about two years. But it will be easier than the Brougham because so much of the woodwork has bee precut by the prior owner. And several body panels refabricated. These were not pictured but I now have a shop full of them.

Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

More pictures showing what the 1918 Kissel Model 6-38 Sedane' or Sedanette with two different tops looks like, as well as the actual car now disassembled. As the Sedan's restoration progresses, we will post more. In two years done!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

post-58797-143142174932_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142174935_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142174937_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142174948_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142174958_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All,

More pictures showing what the 1918 Kissel Model 6-38 Sedane' or Sedanette with two different tops looks like, as well as the actual car now disassembled. As the Sedan's restoration progresses, we will post more. In two years done!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

If transport permits, it would be really cool to show it with one top on and the other displayed alongside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

Time for a few more pictures of the "1918 Kissel All-Year, Hundred Point Six Sedanette" now that we have most of theb parts sorted out. There are also period correct advertisements from 1917 and 1918 which show this two-top car. It appears to be, according to the Kissel Registry, the only removable top Kissel which has survived. I'll restore it first with the soft top, so I can drive it while I carve the oak top pieces needed.

Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

post-58797-143142223402_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142223407_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142223413_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142223423_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

Have been working on the 1918 Kissel Sedanette Chassis. Here are a few pictures from July, 2014 showing the completely rebuilt chassis which has been powder coated, new springs, and ton of suspension parts. Chassis with 6 brand new WHITE Coker "non-skid" 34 x4 tires will be rolling in a month. Then do the Holland Blue wood and main body parts this winter while the fenders and auxillary parts are painted gloss black, and while the Kissel Model 6-38 engine is assembled and run. (That's a Kissel Model 8-126 engine in the background - no car, just engine. Largest 8-cylinder engine produced in the United States - Lycoming, also used in Cord L-29 models, but Kissel customized their Lycoming engines. Big hunk of metal!

post-58797-143142613908_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142613919_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142613928_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

More pictures of the 1918 Kissel Model 6-38 Sedanette restoration. As of today, 10-22-14, the chassis is nearly completed and powder coated and painted. The fenders and aprons have all been fitted, applied, and then taken off to be painted. The wheels are ready to be painted. Now comes the hard part - finishing the removeable oak hard top so that the body can be finished to match, and then, and only then, the converible top. One more year!. Remember, this is the only Kissel Sedanette (4-Passenger Convertible Gibtralter bodyied Kissel) that exists!.

Ron Hausmann P.E,

post-58797-143142792632_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142792643_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142792654_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142792663_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142792673_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was one of these detachable sedan bodies that somebody had found and put in the "What is it"? forum recently. I explained how some cars were made with winter and summer interchangeable bodies but I don't know if the message came across.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

A few more pictures of current restoration as of November 2014. Rear axle has been serviced, restored, and bolted in. rear brakes and new linings have been delivered, installed and faithfully adjusted. Wood wheels have been sanded, painted, clearcoated, and are ready to be mounted on car with tires to complete the rolling chassis. Then we start the wood body framework.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

post-58797-143142855657_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142855671_thumb.jpg

post-58797-14314285568_thumb.jpg

post-58797-14314285569_thumb.jpg

post-58797-1431428557_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ash is also less acidic than oak. Also less stringy. Pretty much the same price as oak, we pay $3-3.50/bd ft for clear kiln dried ash depending on thickness. Some folks can be allergic to ash dust so best to wear a dust mask when sanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Restorer 32 for the advice, which I will follow.

I am just starting the wood restoration of the removeable top, which must be done to guide the dimensional correctness of the body below. A few pictures of the unrestored top are attached. the wood appears to be all ash. The wood for the body however is completely disassembled. Kissel sales literature of the time actually says that they used both oak and ash. and the two Kissels which i have done so far used oak for many of the upright structural members, as in the sedan verticals, and ash for the more carved pieces horizontally. The thick bottom body rails are oak.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

post-58797-143142864806_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142864817_thumb.jpg

post-58797-143142864855_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...