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1946 Lincoln continental $5,500


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Somebody go buy this for 5K and spend a week cleaning it as best you can (I think the paint might surprise you... scrub and treat and clean the interior), try and keep your costs for tires and brakes to be safe, and tuning where you are on a budget (3-4 grand) and then just drive it and don't apologize for any of its warts/flaws.  I have seen far worse interiors clean up to be enjoyed.  It runs and yard drives.  Don't go fixing too much, maybe get some color matched acrylic and do some home paint repairs of a few of the larger flaws.....but go into it thinking you'll not spend more than the bare minimum and then just try and have fun......the mistake would be buying it and thinking you'll restore it.  If that is your mindset, there are nice ones out there in the 20's all the time.....You can't buy this one and put another 50K into it and get it as nice as those 28K examples we see frequently.  

 

https://www.facebook.com/share/D1NBCHvLxVYmqd7M/

 

1946 lincoln continental coupe. very scarce as only 265 were made this year. original flathead v12 is running and yard drives. presentible interior, paint is cracking and pealing. has rebuilt carb, coil, fuel pump ,new headliner and windshield.i dont think the generator is charging the battery though. yes there is rust in floor and trunk. call /text only please. i do not read fb messages nine two zero six six four five eight three one. fresh out of garage i just dont think ill do more with it

 

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I do like this car, can't get one any less expensive, UNLESS, as stated, you wish to restore.  Get it roadworthy, great lines, but any major restoration work and it goes downhill quickly.  I was all in until the rust comments came in, whew, rust is like a burglar, even though one might see the entry point, no telling where it's been...

 

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24 minutes ago, trimacar said:

I do like this car, can't get one any less expensive, UNLESS, as stated, you wish to restore.  Get it roadworthy, great lines, but any major restoration work and it goes downhill quickly.  I was all in until the rust comments came in, whew, rust is like a burglar, even though one might see the entry point, no telling where it's been...

 

David, I totally agree with you.  If structurally it is compromised by rust, don't do it, it's a parts car.  But I wonder if someone takes a more primitive approach to it.  a gallon of rust inhibitor and a four inch brush on all that is hidden, underneath, and the trunk and say "so be it"....The car is almost free.

 

There is only one way to know....go see the car.  who knows, it might be solid structurally and the seller might take a liking to you and drop the price.  But these cars don't bring much money, so very nice ones are always available for someone who can afford a nice Model A....that's about all they bring.

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This Continental reminds me of the way I used to find them in the late 1960's-into the 1970's.  The initial 1950's Continental enthusiasts who had acquired their Continental as used cars had had their fun with the car, interest and enthusiasm had diminished or proceeded onto other cars.  Some were faced with a tired H-Series V-12 which they didn't care to spend to rebuild.  So, their Continentals were set aside in storage collecting dust such as this example. Typically, the prices ask then were still strong, the owners hoping to cash in on whatever residual enthusiasm remained.

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Looks pretty good, this part of the ad didn't state running and driving. It's in Wisconsin, so transporting it would be expensive. Lots of common '50's cars get their rust repaired. Could be a good driver project for the right person. 

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These are really cool. They seem to be one of those rare cool cars that are affordable (relatively speaking) when in nice condition, and restoring cars of that type is often not a good idea (costs quickly take you past the price of a nice example.) The OP's warning is well taken. Hope it finds a good home. 

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Im ok with it in its current condition, and just making it drive to have a fun around the town car. Let me ask everyone a simple question………..did you ever think in your lifetime you could buy a V-12 CCCA classic that runs and drives for five grand? Hell, the engine on a stand with a spray bomb paint job has to be worth 2500 bucks for the cool factor in any man cave.

 

And I can’t not comment on the fact that the seller actually placed a price on the car to sell it. Rather refreshing in my opinion!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, edinmass said:


Im ok with it in its current condition, and just making it drive to have a fun around the town car. Let me ask everyone a simple question………..did you ever think in your lifetime you could buy a V-12 CCCA classic that runs and drives for five grand? Hell, the engine on a stand with a spray bomb paint job has to be worth 2500 bucks for the cool factor in any man cave.

 

And I can’t not comment on the fact that the seller actually placed a price on the car to sell it. Rather refreshing in my opinion!

Yes Ed! You have the got the proper answer! Clean the interior, wash the body and scrub it with a BonAmi, or Ajax cleanser. Change fluids, fresh battery and "Presto" a V12 CCCA driver. No excuses, no problemo ! 

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19 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Let me ask everyone a simple question………..did you ever think in your lifetime you could buy a V-12 CCCA classic that runs and drives for five grand? Hell, the engine on a stand with a spray bomb paint job has to be worth 2500 bucks for the cool factor in any man cave.

 

Ed, that was exactly my point. Some of us have spent $5000 on tires. This car is almost free, V12, recognized classic. Maybe I wouldn’t be so pushy if he said it didn’t run and the engine was locked, but he says it runs and drives around the yard and stops. 
 

i’ve seen some guys take a car with paint like that and shock you after a long weekend of attention and detailing.

 

purely for amusement, I want somebody to buy it and detail it, change the oil and tune it up as best they can and take it to a Grand Caravan and tell everybody they see that they have $5800 in the car.

 

Edited by John Bloom (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, John Bloom said:

Ed, that was exactly my point. Some of us have spent $5000 on tires. This car is almost free, V12, recognized classic. Maybe I wouldn’t be so pushy if he said it didn’t run and the engine was locked, but he says it runs and drives around the yard and stops. 
 

i’ve seen some guys take a car with paint like that and shock you after a long weekend of attention and detailing.

 

purely for amusement, I want somebody to buy it and detail it, change the oil and tune it up as best they can and take it to a Grand Caravan and tell everybody they see that they have $5800 in the car.

 

Clearly this is one of those “if I was closer” cars.  I would absolutely buy it if I was 5 hours away instead of 1400 miles.  If only for the chance to tell people I drove it out of a barn 

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In the 1970's, a local Lincoln enthusiast acquired a dark green postwar Continental coupe in the same condition as this car for $900 iirc.  He did just as suggested here; cleaned it up, serviced it, bled and adjusted the brakes, started driving it daily.  Most of the blue whisp cleared up from the exhaust though still some always remained.  It drove with about all the 'snuff' an H-Series V-12 could muster.   The biggest problem he had to overcome was hydraulic window lifts were not functional.  His fix was to find a Lincoln-Zephyr club coupe in a junkyard and somehow fit the manual window lift mechanisms to the door windows.   The rear quarter windows remained non-functional but with the rear vent windows open, it was fine in the summertime.  Eventually he traded it to another Lincoln man, it's probably still kicking around somewhere.

Edited by 58L-Y8
corrected syntax errors (see edit history)
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I have always liked these Lincolns.  I recall reading an article in either C&P or Old Cars Weekly from around 78 stating there appears to be more Lincoln Continentals around, despite relatively low production numbers due to the fact they were pretty special when new and had a high survival rate even though many were repower.  The other comment was they seem to change hands frequently.  Hmmm...  

 

That said this one seems like a heck of a deal to me.  

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