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1931 Lincoln LeBaron Roadster V8 $125,000


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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/109688485724052/?ref=notif&hoisted_items=2706950556223884

Condition

Used - Good It has been in storage for 8 years. It has not been started in that amount of time. Great condition. Clear title. Call for a appointment 828 638 8796 Serial number 68362
 
 
Beautiful car.  You should add it to your collection George. :)
 
 
 

 

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7 minutes ago, suchan said:

Awesome car.

Not sure how popular the '70's-style paint colors are nowadays, but the beauty of the car transcends them.

Not popular as to Tan/Brown/Orange - though I have been painting wheels maroon and putting a little lighter color maroon to dark red pinstripes on them and they seem to sell quickly enough - you buy a car for the quality of what it was prior to restoration and quality of restoration thereafter. 

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Well, I still cannot find a link to the the actual ad - but the only issue I see for this car is the pricing of better cars which run and don’t require that extent of color correction. 
https://forums.aaca.org/topic/340165-1931-lincoln-k-lebaron/

(Yes, I used the words ‘better’ and ‘color correction’ and they stay. I feel badly for anyone who uses appraisers these days.)
 

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Beautiful car. Thanks for posting the ad. I know nothing about this era of cars, or the color schemes or valuations, but it sure is elegant. Seems like a lot of money, but considering what other fancy luxury cars from this era go for, maybe it's a good deal. I'm curious, though:

 

Quote

 It has been in storage for 8 years. It has not been started in that amount of time. Great condition.

 

I'm wondering how that happens with a car this valuable kept in this condition. And with that kind of asking price, why wouldn't (judicious) attempts be made to start the car prior to sale? Should that be a red flag, or is it not that uncommon with cars like this? Thanks.

 

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5 minutes ago, JamesR said:

Beautiful car. Thanks for posting the ad. I know nothing about this era of cars, or the color schemes or valuations, but it sure is elegant. Seems like a lot of money, but considering what other fancy luxury cars from this era go for, maybe it's a good deal. I'm curious, though:

 

 

I'm wondering how that happens with a car this valuable kept in this condition. And with that kind of asking price, why wouldn't (judicious) attempts be made to start the car prior to sale? Should that be a red flag, or is it not that uncommon with cars like this? Thanks.

 


Often sales like these are estate situations or a widow.  Cars that have sat for 8 years usually means 10-15 which usually means lots of needs.

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:


Often sales like these are estate situations or a widow.  Cars that have sat for 8 years usually means 10-15 which usually means lots of needs.

Umm... Yup.

I bought one of those estate cars, though a much cheaper make. The owner stopped driving it regularly when it became too much for him at some point in his 80’s. Had sat idle but well stored for 10 full years by the time he passed at age 96.

It was not apparent (to me) at first, it looked spectacular and the gas tank was CLEAN, but there were LOTS of little needs. One of those little needs (a cotter pin) cost $20,000.

 

No car can sit, but pre-war cars really suffer. Bordering on slandering the car, but in all honesty, a restored car that has sat 8, 10, 12+ years should have $20,000 off the price of an identical maintained running car (in the Lincoln’s price class at least). MINIMUM.


Some cars choose their owners... I love my car. I’m glad I have it. No regrets. But I would not buy another non-running estate car even at the discounted price. There are not hours in the day or years left in my life to deal with that ever again - and I’m not that old.

Edited by Ben P.
Clarity (see edit history)
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What a sales pitch.........old, dirty, tossed aside and ignored old cars, left to go to hell...........come on over with a truck and pay me. I can’t bother to take good photos, air up the tires, or wash them off. Sad....

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There was a very nice, mostly original, running and driving one these for sale for about that money listed in Hemmings for the longest time recently (like last year I think). Anybody remember it? Washington state I think? History and provenance going back to the 1950's, a great looking car.

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There would be a great difference in appearance if the shutters up front surrounded by the shell were painted fender color. Painted the light color make it look "to busy" .  Tan and Brown with orange wheels were a popular color starting in the early 1970s , especially for open body style cars. Most who dislike the colors now didn't mind them to much then , BUT to many cars saw that color combination because it became popular. Another popular trend was to mount Trippe lights up front on everything , every make from 1927 to 1942 - be it a Packard or a Plymouth, as well as cast step plates on the running boards, and the - "plating of everything" that was removable syndrome . Another popular color combination was silver and maroon , didn't matter if the car was a roadster or a 7 passenger sedan - silver and maroon.  Currently restorations try to stick to period colors - but now the popular trend is to polish anything aluminum - hoods, fenders etc.. especially on cars of European manufacture.  These cars seem to be prevalent in attendance at Concours shows - ya know , the 'park and pose ' crowd.

Edited by Walt G
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On 12/22/2020 at 12:34 PM, Ben P. said:

Does anyone have a link that’ll go to this ad and not to a bunch of household garbage for those of us who will not give all our information to subversive FaceBook? 🙂

 

FF0A08F3-B620-4481-8A01-F9FCFAD58FDE.jpeg

l'd love to help you Ben, but I don't do Facebook.  It's way too negatively political for me.

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1 hour ago, md murray said:

There was a very nice, mostly original, running and driving one these for sale for about that money listed in Hemmings for the longest time recently (like last year I think). Anybody remember it? Washington state I think? History and provenance going back to the 1950's, a great looking car.

Is this ⬇️ the car?

https://forums.aaca.org/topic/340165-1931-lincoln-k-lebaron/

 

I wish now I had taken screen-shots of all the HMN photos and the entire write up. Forget how quickly HMN links go bad.

 

To my eyes these ‘31 Lincolns are amongst the prettiest cars ever built though I really do prefer the Club Sedans because their proportions are better.

Maybe on the other side of the Pearly Gates - I’ve got a Buick my finances can just barely keep up with.

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125 K for a car, that while I like it......hasn’t run in ten years and has gone to hell..........they are only about 100k over the money. Their approaching education is going to be brutal. The colors while popular in the 60’s and 70’s make that car a give away to change hands.......and add in ten years of neglect ........and 20k to clean it up minimum. Sad situation for a neat car.

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"Estatesales.net"   You can log on and they will send you notices of 'estate sales' in your area. 

After a year I took my name off the list.  

 

I dont know, are they a franchise? But every sale I went to was outrageously priced!  

 

They have household items (cleaning materials) marked higher than you could buy them at the market!  Sometimes the original store sticker is on it.

There was a plastic workbench drawer set with a bunch of nuts & bolts. $25!!!  I thought $5 would have been generous. 

 

They have refused to negotiate. The sales I have visited have listed only firm prices. To me getting a deal is the only reason I would ever consider going to a sale. 

 

Their deal seems to be that they hold the sale and leave you with an empty house. I do know that they commonly drag unsold items (furniture etc) to the next sale location. 

 

They rarely have cars, but they have demonstrated that they know nothing about automobiles or the marketing  of them. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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