1927Chevy

1927 Chevrolet Capitol for sale AVAILABLE 8-18-19

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Posted (edited)

Very nice 4 door ready for parade.  Located 53147 also could be available at 60655 if better. Car completely redone 20 years ago including new wood.  Kept inside always. This car starts right up and is a very nice riding car. Recent clutch and valve job. Car is all original. Everything works including all gauges that look new. This car won best antique at a couple of car show in the past. Priced to sell 8750 or best offer. 

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Edited by 1927Chevy
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very nice car, would look great in my garage next to the 1929 4 door :)

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Posted (edited)

It's good to see affordable cars reasonably priced.

This helps the hobby, especially when the cars are

pre-war, an underappreciated area of the hobby these days.

Wouldn't it be great if the buyer was 20 years old

and this was his first antique car?

 

To make sure your car isn't "flipped" by someone

who is interested mostly in money, consider having the

buyer sign a contract that includes phraseology like:

"This car shall not be resold, nor reassigned to another

party, nor modified from its historically authentic state,

for a period of XXX years [say 2 years] from the 

purchase date of YYYY."  And include a penalty,

large enough to take away all potential profit, for the case

that that contract provision is broken.  I have heard of flippers 

masquerading as sincere buyers, because sellers

often want to find good homes for their cars.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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4 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

To make sure your car isn't "flipped" by someone

who is interested mostly in money, consider having the

buyer sign a contract that includes phraseology like:

"This car shall not be resold, nor reassigned to another

party, nor modified from its historically authentic state

for a period of XXX years [say 2 years] from the 

purchase date of YYYY."  And include a penalty if that

contract provision is broken.  I have heard of flippers 

masquerading as sincere buyers, because sellers

often want to find good homes for their cars.

 

Interesting but totally unenforceable.  

 

The auto industry tried this is 1945-46 during the sellers market (OPA prices were fixed on 'new' cars but there were no caps on the prices for 'used' cars)  So, the process was to buy a new car today and sell it tomorrow for significantly more. Lots of legal time spent trying to stop the practice but to no avail. In one case the judge could not even define a used car for the purpose of preventing the black marketers. He disregarded the 'titled and registered' that people use today and wanted to make it based on mileage or time. He failed. 

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10 minutes ago, m-mman said:

Interesting but totally unenforceable.  

 

Sorry, I disagree.

But if you're a practicing lawyer and have experience

in similar contract law, I'll be happy to learn more.

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The enforceabilty involves damages. If you sold your car you presumably received the full value that existed for it AT THAT TIME.

If I buy the car and am able to sell it for a higher amount that is my good luck and you (the seller) have not been damaged legally. 

 

Presumably I sold it for a higher amount because I . . .  changed the selling location/venue, added value to the car such as repairs, the market conditions changed during my ownership or I was just able to find a buyer who would pay more than you could. Once an item has been sold The seller has no legal right to share in any subsequent profits AND equally important, the seller has no responsibility to share in any loses. (any misrepresentation of the item would be used to cancel the original deal) An example of this is the dealer who is trying to reverse the deal on a very expensive Seinfeld Porsche. Presumably he is unable to make a profit and wants to back out by claiming fraud. 

 

This does look like a fine car being offered at a very fair price and I hope it finds a loving home but one it is sold, the new owner can do with it as they wish. 

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I'm still unconvinced, but we shouldn't get

any more off-topic.  I'd rather see insights into

1927 Chevrolets!

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Look up the wrestler who sold his Ford GT sports car before he was supposed to. Ford sued him but they settled so I think it's hard to enforce but if theres enuf money involved maybe its worth it.

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14 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

It's good to see affordable cars reasonably priced.

This helps the hobby, especially when the cars are

pre-war, an underappreciated area of the hobby these days.

Wouldn't it be great if the buyer was 20 years old

and this was his first antique car?

 

To make sure your car isn't "flipped" by someone

who is interested mostly in money, consider having the

buyer sign a contract that includes phraseology like:

"This car shall not be resold, nor reassigned to another

party, nor modified from its historically authentic state,

for a period of XXX years [say 2 years] from the 

purchase date of YYYY."  And include a penalty,

large enough to take away all potential profit, for the case

that that contract provision is broken.  I have heard of flippers 

masquerading as sincere buyers, because sellers

often want to find good homes for their cars.

This is day dreaming .everybody looks at the ads that show up and if a dealer ( and other people ) sees a car he can make some money on he will buy it and flip it the next day ( cannot blame him )It happens all day and everyday .When i came to the US people said i don't sell cars that go out of the country but when i showed them the $$ they changed their mind and everything was set aside .. 

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On 8/13/2019 at 12:53 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

It's good to see affordable cars reasonably priced.

This helps the hobby, especially when the cars are

pre-war, an underappreciated area of the hobby these days.

Wouldn't it be great if the buyer was 20 years old

and this was his first antique car?

 

To make sure your car isn't "flipped" by someone

who is interested mostly in money, consider having the

buyer sign a contract that includes phraseology like:

"This car shall not be resold, nor reassigned to another

party, nor modified from its historically authentic state,

for a period of XXX years [say 2 years] from the 

purchase date of YYYY."  And include a penalty,

large enough to take away all potential profit, for the case

that that contract provision is broken.  I have heard of flippers 

masquerading as sincere buyers, because sellers

often want to find good homes for their cars.

Seems to me that you want to have your cake and eat it too. The car isn’t yours after you sell it. Unfortunate as it would be, if the new owner wanted to take a sledgehammer to it after the title was in his name it  he is now the steward of the car. Zeke

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2 hours ago, zeke01 said:

 The car isn’t yours after you sell it. 

 

Valid contractual restrictions will help protect the car.

Clearly, a valid contract requires agreement by both parties,

as well as a monetary consideration.

The penalty does not constitute "damages";  it is part of the agreement.

 

I've been grateful to have plenty of friends who are lawyers.

This has some of the same purpose as a Deed of Trust in

real estate, where one can impose various conditions that

remain in place AFTER the sale, even in perpetuity.

 

NOW LET'S GET BACK TO INSIGHTS ON CHEVROLETS!

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Why does the car need protecting? If someone buys it for this list price (which is more than fair!) and sells it for a profit to someone else who will love the car, where's the harm? In my experience, nobody buys an old car because they hate it and intend to abuse and/or neglect it. Whatever the buy-in, the car usually ends up with someone who will love it and enjoy it. If the buyer is satisfied with his purchase and the price and the seller is happy with the result, then it's a win-win regardless of the absolute dollar figure attached to said transaction. When the time comes, will you be selling your car at cheap prices to help the next guy? Or will you try to pull out every penny you put in plus a little extra just because? There isn't any altruism in this hobby when it comes time to pull the money out of your wallet.

 

In this car's case, I think it is EXTREMELY reasonably priced and hopefully an enthusiast will grab it up and enjoy it. It neatly eliminates most of the excuses people have when buying an old car. I don't really see a gold mine, but I do think it's under-priced by a bit, but again, if the seller and buyer are happy with the result, who am I to judge?

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43 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Valid contractual restrictions will help protect the car.

Clearly, a valid contract requires agreement by both parties,

as well as a monetary consideration.

The penalty does not constitute "damages";  it is part of the agreement.

 

I've been grateful to have plenty of friends who are lawyers.

This has some of the same purpose as a Deed of Trust in

real estate, where one can impose various conditions that

remain in place AFTER the sale, even in perpetuity.

 

NOW LET'S GET BACK TO INSIGHTS ON CHEVROLETS!

My finial comment on the topic is this:  How many people are going to purchase an automobile and let the seller continue to have a say in what the buyer does with the car? Will the original seller retain a claim to the car after the next owner sells it. Can the original owner leave his partial ownership to an heir in his will?  The mind boggles. Zeke

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