Kristin

1927 REO Flying Cloud

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1927 REO Flying Cloud

2 door 

Excellent condition. Should be a fun and reasonably easy restoration project for any car enthusiast. 

It's been garaged for nearly 50 years. 

Last ran in 1974, when it was driven into the garage it's still in.

 

id love to see this car go to someone who wants to preserve a little bit of history. 

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AFA18A4C-5B86-4A67-949D-1DF5A96B253F.jpeg

7CB90FC9-EF19-415B-9983-4D719C96C6DF.jpeg

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Hello;

 

     Where are you located?    Do you have a dollar figure in mind?    Thanks;;     Jim 43

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Excuse my ignorance but what are those brackets across the back for?

Cool old car.

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1 minute ago, JACK M said:

Excuse my ignorance but what are those brackets across the back for?

Cool old car.

To keep the trunk from contacting the body.

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Hmm,

I was thinking that they may be in the way of the trunk lid.

They also are spaced out wider than said trunk.

I don't see any sign of the brackets marking the lid.

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However, I certainly know better than to argue car facts with my old buddy John.  :D

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If  there  was  not  a trunk  bolted  to  the  car,  they  would  be  used  as  ti-downs for  any  thing  you  needed to  carry  on  the  trunk  rack.

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That's  a  car  that  needs to  be  serviced and  driven  AS  IS, no  fancy  restoration. 

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I agree! That’s why I’ve listed it here. I hope to sell it to someone who appreciates what it is. I don’t want it turned into a hotrod with a weird paint job. It’s in such great shape the way it is. 

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I also agree, it’s too nice to restore. Someone will fall in love with it at some point and be very happy with her. Good luck with your sale 

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I copied your ad and placed it in the Reo Section here on the AACA . I also put it in the Reo Club yahoo group .  

 reoclubofamerica@yahoogroups.com
I owned a 1926 Reo T6 Sedan and they are excellent car . I am currently restoring a 1931 Reo Royale Victoria . Reo over built all the parts .

 

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7 hours ago, JACK M said:

Hmm,

I was thinking that they may be in the way of the trunk lid.

They also are spaced out wider than said trunk.

I don't see any sign of the brackets marking the lid.

 

 

I don't think the trunk was designed to fit the car.  It's probably an aftermarket.  As you say, the brackets are spaced wider than the trunk.  The rack also is wider.  The two brackets on the ends extend downward on the body to serve as rub strips for a wider trunk, as well as tie-downs.  The four between them do not extend past the belt line and likely were intended as just tie-downs.  Presumably an appropriately sized trunk would have some provision so the lid did not hit the tie-downs.

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I love this car. But I cannot buy anything. There are six of those bars, all extend down near the bottom of the body. The four in the middle are adequate to protect the body. And yes, the trunk is an after-market, and a bit smaller than was intended for the car.

I had a '29 Reo Flying Cloud Master fifty years ago. An incredible car to drive! Mine was the semi-sport-coupe with rumble seat which had similar bars on the trunk lid as tie-downs for additional whatever one wanted to carry on the back.

One time, I was driving to a club tour, uphill on the freeway at my usual comfortable 45 mph, when I wondered what it could really do. So I pressed the pedal to the wood and heard a deep throaty rumble as the car picked up speed at a surprising rate! At 55 mph, I decided that was enough, I knew it had more power than any antique really needed and settled back to my comfortable 45. This car, being a bit heavier, and modern gasoline delivering less power than it used to, it would not do quite that well. However, it would still be a great tour car for the nickel age crowd!

I wish I could afford it.

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CHuDWah is correct....the four bars in the center do NOT extend all of the way down like the outer two do....

1927 REO sedan.jpeg

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9 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

...There are six of those bars, all extend down near the bottom of the body...

 

CHuDWah is correct....the four bars in the center do NOT extend all of the way down like the outer two do....1927 REO sedan.jpeg

 

Apparently wayne sheldon's 29 was different from this 27 and/or his Master was different from whatever series this one is.

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59 minutes ago, CHuDWah said:

 

 

Apparently wayne sheldon's 29 was different from this 27 and/or his Master was different from whatever series this one is.

Well, here is a 1929 REO and the center four are short like the 1927....

1929 REO sedan.jpeg

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9 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

Well, here is a 1929 REO and the center four are short like the 1927....

1929 REO sedan.jpeg

 

 

Yup.  Also, that trunk appears identical to the one on the 27.  Wonder if they really are OEM equipment?  If so, I can't see that the long strips serve any function other than aesthetic.

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I used to own a '27 REO. Nice driving car. First year for four-wheel hydraulic brakes, too.

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Well, okay? I have seen several other makes of cars (including mid '20s Buicks, Marmon and several others) with bars like that on the back of sedans and even touring cars where all bars went to near the bottom. And, of course, many more cars did not have such bars than did. I think they were more for decoration than holding heavy loads. However, they did also protect the back of the body  somewhat. The castings with my '29 were not really good quality, and a few were broken. I actually had a few replacements made for it. The mounting holes left no doubt that the coupe's rumble seat lid had bars that showed the full space when the rumble seat was opened. The bars on the sides of the lid were longer. If there are now two such Reo coaches that way? Maybe so.But I would be very surprised if there were not holes near the bottom of the body for the other end of those bars.

Regardless, that is a beautiful Reo, and would make an excellent tour car for someone.

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On 2/15/2019 at 5:09 AM, wayne sheldon said:

Well, okay? I have seen several other makes of cars (including mid '20s Buicks, Marmon and several others) with bars like that on the back of sedans and even touring cars where all bars went to near the bottom. And, of course, many more cars did not have such bars than did. I think they were more for decoration than holding heavy loads. However, they did also protect the back of the body  somewhat. The castings with my '29 were not really good quality, and a few were broken. I actually had a few replacements made for it. The mounting holes left no doubt that the coupe's rumble seat lid had bars that showed the full space when the rumble seat was opened. The bars on the sides of the lid were longer. If there are now two such Reo coaches that way? Maybe so.But I would be very surprised if there were not holes near the bottom of the body for the other end of those bars.

Regardless, that is a beautiful Reo, and would make an excellent tour car for someone.

 

 

Or maybe coach and coupe are different?  I've seen other cars where trim differs by body style.

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I got my old 22, T6 sedan REO running this summer, first start in 36 yrs... can anyone explain for me the purpose of the oil can in the engine compartment...?

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Back in those days, oil wasn't quite as good as today's modified creations, most engines lacked pressure oiling to everything, most roads were very dirty if they were even paved at all creating dust that got into everything. Automobiles required regular oiling of starter and generator bushings, distributor shafts, spring shackles, speedometer cables, and sometimes any of a dozen other things. Some things according to the owner's and maintenance manuals required oiling every day! This was mostly to flush out the road dust. However, most of those things even today should be given a squirt or two every few local drives,  or hundred miles. Some items even back in the day had fifty, hundred, two hundred, or five hundred (or other?) mile interim oilings. These should still be followed somewhat. Some people use chain or bar oil in many of those places.  It is stickier and requires adding or flushing less often. In some places, chain and/or bar oil being stickier can collect dust more easily, therefore, in some locations it may be a bad idea. Any oil, especially sticky oil, mixed with fine dust becomes an abrasive compound suitable for lapping valves into a block. You can guess how destructive it can be for a distributor bushing.

 

The simple reason for those oil can holders on the firewall is simply a convenient place to keep a filled and ready oil can for the routine maintenance. A few cars had such holders from the factory. Most of them were an after-market add-on.

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Same answer from the Studebaker thread may apply. Many cars still had priming cups on the engine for cold weather starting, if so that can held an amount of raw gasoline for use in the priming cups. 

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