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Is the frame of that car port plastic or aluminum?  If aluminum, make sure it is rated for the snow load in your area.  I had one collapse with the first inch of wet snow, creasing the roof on my 93 Regal.  I was lucky it did not break the glass.  If it's plastic, don't take a chance on it over the winter.

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18 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

Is the frame of that car port plastic or aluminum?  If aluminum, make sure it is rated for the snow load in your area.  I had one collapse with the first inch of wet snow, creasing the roof on my 93 Regal.  I was lucky it did not break the glass.  If it's plastic, don't take a chance on it over the winter.

How are you.  The frame is steel, 1.27 inch tubular framing.  No plastic or aluminum.  Very strong.  I actually hung off the top of it without an issue.  So I am not worried about snow.  But thanks for the heads up.

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what happens with those is the snow builds up on the tarp between the top frame pieces and the tarp sags, the snow melts and the water left in the sag ends up eventually penetrating the tarp. I ran a piece of 10-2 w/ground between the top frame members and while it still accumulated a little snow/water not enough to be concerned about.   I also ran a piece of 3/4" pvc in the bottom hem of the door to make rolling up easier.

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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

what happens with those is the snow builds up on the tarp between the top frame pieces and the tarp sags, the snow melts and the water left in the sag ends up eventually penetrating the tarp. I ran a piece of 10-2 w/ground between the top frame members and while it still accumulated a little snow/water not enough to be concerned about.   I also ran a piece of 3/4" pvc in the bottom hem of the door to make rolling up easier.

I will definitely follow up on that.  I don't want to take any chances.  This has to last a good while...until we can get a garage built.  Thanks Mr Lamar!

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7 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I will definitely follow up on that.  I don't want to take any chances.  This has to last a good while...until we can get a garage built.  Thanks Mr Lamar!

 

 You can use rope too, probably, I just used what I had on hand one day when they were calling for snow that night.  The tarp will start leaking going into the second year.  When that happens just buy a good tarp and strap over the top .  As you can see I am an expert on these things . :rolleyes::(

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Okay, so after my baby boy gets to an age where he doesn't need the constant attention of an infant, I can now start back up the removal process.  By now, my son had just turned 2.  My daughter is also taking an interest in the Buick and wants to follow me everywhere to help me out.  Of course I am eating this all up.  My daughter and I remove the trunk handle ornament.DSCN3699.JPGVery simple, just remove the 4 bolts inside the trunk.DSCN3701.JPGTrunk handle ornament off the car.DSCN3703.JPG

Edited by Kosage Chavis
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So, at this point, I felt it was a good time to move to the inside of the car and begin removing interior parts.  As you can tell, my daughter is now taken an interest in the Buick and is helping out.  I started with the simple stuff.  Hanger clips are first.  My daughter  is showing the location of the clip in comparison  to one of the screw locations of the trim.DSCN3709.JPGShowing the removed clips.  The tape is to retain the screws with clips.DSCN3711.JPG

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just found this picture on Facebook.  A gentleman named Robert Tollenaere sold me the car.  He took this picture the day he towed the car to my house and sold it to me.  He mentioned in the post that he finally sold his 55 Buick Century and that he felt it was going to a good home.  True indeed Mr. Rob!405081_497634363604626_127324380_n.jpg

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Thanks for posting the process you are making with such clear pictures and detailed explanations! Your leaving a great legacy for me and other folks to follow to be able to refer back to these photos and text. The manuals don't do near the justice your doing here. I just "binged" through it anxious for more! Good luck. Greg

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12 hours ago, 2carb40 said:

Thanks for posting the process you are making with such clear pictures and detailed explanations! Your leaving a great legacy for me and other folks to follow to be able to refer back to these photos and text. The manuals don't do near the justice your doing here. I just "binged" through it anxious for more! Good luck. Greg

The pleasure is all mine.  Thank you for your kind words.  It is my intent to simplify the restoration process as much as possible.  Lord knows I don't have nearly as much knowledge as some as the others, but breaking it down into more digestible pieces will help.  I'm so glad you are able to make use of my post.  I have more to put up.  Take it easy.

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All interior trim would come next starting with the door just beneath the door window.

Then the trim just beneath the rear window (part 1).

Part 2 of the same piece of trim.

Showing the step panels at the door.  Just remove all screws and gently pull the panel up.DSCN3783.JPGTurning to the rear windshield trim removal.

Removal of trim above the side windows.

Removal of trim at the front windshield.  Please forgive me, but it was getting dark that day and visibility in this video is pretty bad.  Once you are left with the front windshield trim (2 pieces), just remove screws and gently pull off.  This will then expose screws that hold up sun visors and rear view mirror.  Simply remove those screws and remove sun visors and rear view mirror.

Showing all trim, rear seat, rear view mirror and sun visors off the car.IMG_20160605_163633.jpg

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Upper portion of front dash was next.  When all screws are removed, be sure to pull back on upper dash to remove.  Do not force too much, as to be sure not to damage anything.  Once the upper dash is pulled out, disconnect the radio light at the connector.  Be very careful of sharp edges.  For the exception of dislodging the upper dash from rest of dash assembly, this is a pretty easy.

 

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Started removal of the door decorative panels next.  The video explains it all.  Just be sure not to damage the plastic washers for all of the hand cranks during removal.  Also,  these panels are also held in with nails along the periphery of the panel.  Pry slowly.  I did keep all the nails.  You never know.

Panel after removal.  Be sure to group each hand crank with its own set of hardware and then label.DSCN3735.JPGPanel off of car.

DSCN3736.JPG

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Removal of rear decorative upper and lower panels.  For the upper panel, remove hand crank and screws.  The panel should be pulled from top, leaving behind the lower panel.  The lower panel only has screws retaining it.  Just simply remove.

 

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Rear dash panel is next.  My hand is touching the flange like strip that is screwed in just behind the top part of the seat.  Just remove screws and the panel will slide out forward.  In my case, I also had to remove speakers before sliding out the panel.DSCN3782.JPG

 

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Removed access panels from front doors (2 total per door) shown in picture below.  Just remove screws and pry open.  DSCN3792.JPG

The video will show the other access panel already removed which will give you access to the rear quarter panel nameplates.  The video will also explain how to remove the nameplate.

 

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Some of the AC parts I got from my trip to Georgia, compliments of Mr. Lamar.

 

Sight glass and associated tubing.20160807_160544.jpg20160807_160519.jpgBoth factory copper lines that connect to AC receiver.20160807_161609.jpgFactory braided line.  I already have the other (stored away).20160807_163519.jpgAll other factory copper lines that connect the front with the rear (compliments of Matt)IMG_20160501_133057.jpg

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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More factory AC items received from my trip to Georgia, compliments of Mr. Lamar.

 

Factory AC condensor.20160807_174318.jpgFactory AC power steering pump.20160807_151636.jpg

Factory AC dehydrator.20160807_144325.jpg

Factory AC solenoid valve.20160807_142119.jpg

Factory AC 5 blade engine fan.20160807_135548.jpg

Factory AC receiver.20160807_133610.jpg

Factory AC control panel.20160807_131929.jpg

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 The last of the AC parts from my GA trip.

 

Factory AC evaporator box.IMG_7955.JPGFactory resistor and evaporator drain tubes.20160807_164358.jpg

Factory AC compressor and AC generator (generator bought from another person)20160807_123447.jpgFactory AC grill and duct sets (ducts do not fit my car, still looking for correct size (compliments of Matt).IMG_20160501_131228.jpg

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4 hours ago, old-tank said:

Be sure to seal all components that had refrigerant inside and store inside in low humidity.  Rust will form and render them useless.

All AC items were boxed up and kept in my garage.  Stays pretty cool in summer and stays warm during the winter.  However, I did not temp cap the outlets.  Am I in good shape or do I need to go back and temp cap?  Thanks Mr. Willie.

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10 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

All AC items were boxed up and kept in my garage.  Stays pretty cool in summer and stays warm during the winter.  However, I did not temp cap the outlets.  Am I in good shape or do I need to go back and temp cap?  Thanks Mr. Willie.

Needs to be capped/sealed and inside.  It is too humid in the garage.  Refrigerant oil will absorb moisture and does not protect from rust like other oils...in fact it will promote rust!  If you are not ready to refurbish the compressor take the cylinder head off the back to inspect and spray down the cylinders and valves with WD-40; you should be able to turn it with a 1/2 wrench on the front bolt.  Then re-assemble and turn the service valves to close off the insides.

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So the panels located just under where the bottom portion of the rear seat would be if still installed.  Each side has about 3 to 5 nails.  You'll need a flat head screwdriver, small hammer and plyers to remove nails.  Tap the head of the screwdriver underneath the head of the nail, until the nail sticks out enough to grab and turn with some plyers.  The nails act like screws, so turn counterclockwise to remove.20160813_164753.jpgThere is also a rigid pad underneath that should be glued to the fabric.  Remove together.20160813_164848.jpgShowing the panels outside the car.20160813_170108.jpg

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 I moved to the removal of the headliner next.  All the trim has already been removed at this point.20160813_172214.jpgRemove all nails from the whole periphery of the headliner.  All you should need is some needle nose plyers.  Yes, I kept all the nails.20160813_172256.jpgWhen all nails are removed, gently pull edges of headliner off car body.  The video below will explain the rest.

Showing hard top without headliner.20160813_180225.jpg

Showing headliner off of the car.20160813_180339.jpg20160813_180242.jpg

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Next, I removed the front seat skirts.20160827_165600.jpgVery simple, just lean seat forward and you'll have access to all screws.  Mine had 3 in the back and 2 in the front.  Be sure to lift the whole panel slightly off of foundation.  Then you will gently pry the front end away from seat.  Once you do this, the whole panel comes right off.  Don't forget the seat adjustment button.  Loosen the screw at the bottom.  It is an internal hex socket head screw.20160827_164234.jpgShowing skirts off of car.20160827_165934.jpg

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After removing the front seat skirts, I found a few interesting items tucked underneath the driver's seat.  This can has to be almost 30 years old.  Not sure about the cigarette pack.  The most interesting were a bunch of old check stubs dated as early as 1974.20160827_173309.jpgWhen I bought this car from Robert Tollenaere, he mentioned that he bought the Buick from an older lady who's husband died a while back.  Turns out the name that appears on these check stubs was the husband of the woman who sold the car to Robert Tollenaere.  I then got a little curious and decided to do some research.

 

The name of the guy on the check stubs was Clarence A. Dively.  Turns out that Mr. Dively passed away in 1978 at the age of 75 in Hampton, VA.  His wife, Mary V. Dively, passed away much later in 2001 at the age of 88 in Hampton, VA.  Even though I could not find any more info on Mr. Dively, I did find an obituary for his wife.  The obituary stated that she passed away after dealing with a "long illness".  There is also no mention of any children and states that her sister and sister's husband were her primary caregivers before her death.  

 

I do know that Robert Tollenaere bought the car in 2000.  So based on all the info, I was able extrapolate these things...

 

This car was once owned by Clarence A. Dively and kept at their house in Hampton, VA.streetview.jpgMr. Dively had this car at least as early as the early 1970's.  In 1978, Mr. Dively passed away and naturally, all his belongings remained with his wife.  In the year 2000, Mrs. Dively became very ill and had to move in her sister's house.  Being that they had no children, she put the house (pictured above) and the Buick up for sale.  Mr. Tollenaere literally lived just 3 blocks down from the Dively residence.  Mr. Tollenaere probably either saw the car or heard about it from someone he knew and then purchased it in 2000.  Mrs. Dively passed away about a year later.  After purchasing the Buick, Mr. Tollenaere would move to another house about 5 minutes away, still in Hampton, VA.  He owned the car for about 12 years before putting it up for sale.  A coworker of mine would then spot the car, informed me of it and I purchased the car in late 2012.  I am at least the 3rd owner of the car.

 

Still would like to know of anything pryer to the early 1970's, but this will have to do for now until I can find any other clues.  

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My car was born on the assembly lines of the General Motors Assembly Plant in Wilmington, Delaware (pictured below).Hist-cars_sd.jpgOut of 80,338 of these cars, mine was the 17,688th off the line.  The upholstery is blue cloth/blue vinyl.  The exterior paint is stafford blue metallic on top, condor yellow at the center and stafford blue metallic at the bottom.  This is the body label from my car.20160908_165651.jpg

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Today, I got a little time to break away and touch the Buick.  Decided to remove both car doors.20160910_173506.jpgFirst, locate the door hinge bolts.  There 3 at the top and 3 at the bottom.20160910_173641.jpg20160910_173826.jpgRemove only 2 bolts from each set, leaving one still in it's place.  Then, remove the last bolt from the bottom hinge first.  Place a jackstand at the base of the door to support the door before removing the very last bolt.  I put some cloth between the jack and the door to avoid any damage to the door.20160910_174435.jpgRemove the last bolt.  Carefully slide the door from its hinges.  The door is a little heavy, so be careful.  Showing the hinges.20160910_174807.jpgShowing the doors off of the car.20160910_174707.jpgAll in all, this was more easier than what I thought.

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