Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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Lights were already detached, so I just snipped the wire some where in the middle, enough room on both sides to reattach at installation.DSCN2554.JPGShowing the car's rear with everything removed.  Decided to leave the bumper foundations on for now.DSCN2553.JPGThis was a stopping point for me.  I would have to wait till the next opportunity for some free time to get more done.

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Those bumper brackets are second only to a trailer hitch for causing injury and flying cuss words, I would advise removing them soon....;)

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LOL!  You are so right.  I have already hurt myself on these things by walking by them.  As soon as I am done removing the interior, that will be the first thing I do.

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About a month later, I was able to pick up where I left off.  Started with the front bumper.  This thing took a while.  From looking at it, it seemed best to take the whole bottom off as one assembly.  I started with the bumper-to-bracket bolts.  I then removed the bolts that directly mounted to the car body.  These are found where the ends of the bumper wrap around the body.DSCN2556.JPGHere is what it looks like with lower bumper removed.  There are 6 bumper-to-bracket bolts in all...one behind each bullet bumper, one on each side of licence plate bracket and one on both sides of bumper.  The other bolts are removed from behind the body.  Remember to support both sides. DSCN2557.JPGThe upper portion of the bumper is much easier and is removed in 3 pieces...middle and 2 sides which interlock with each other.  Bolts are easy to access at this point.DSCN2560.JPG

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When the whole bumper is removed, you will now have easy access to all the grill assembly bolts.  All grill bolts are at the periphery.  Do not confuse the grill bolts with the drip shield bolts as shown here.DSCN2561.JPGHere is a picture of the grill assembly off the car.  Notice that there are 3 drip shields still mounted on the grill.  I plan on taking things off as an assembly where it makes sense, like this.  It allows for parts to track easier and not become misplaced.DSCN2563.JPGWhat the car looks like with the grill assembly off.DSCN2564.JPG

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Gas door frame was next.  DSCN2565.JPGJust remove the two screws and move to a safe place.  The metal work could easily be bent if stepped on.DSCN2566.JPG

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The BUICK nameplate was next.  This task was easy.  All you need is a flathead screwdriver and a rubber mallet.  Just locate the tabs of the nameplate on the underside of the hood.  Place the head of the screwdriver up against a tab and lightly tap the head of screwdriver, applying a little more force each time till the tab pops out.  There is a locking sleeve on each tab.  Be sure not to lose these.DSCN2568.JPGAs you can see, each letter has 2 tabs.DSCN2570.JPGEntire nameplate removed.DSCN2571.JPG

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Hood ornament is up now.  Another easy task.  Only 3 bolts hold this assembly on.  DSCN2572.JPGTook a picture of the assembly underneath.  The rod and associated clip are held together with the same bolt that holds the hood ornament.  Can anyone please tell me what the purpose of this rod is?DSCN2574.JPGShowing the car with hood ornament removed.DSCN2575.JPGShowing the removed hood ornament.DSCN2576.JPG

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Hello,

Wishing you all the best with your car. :) 

While I'm hooked on 58's due to being my first cars, the 55's would be my next choice simply because of their design. Love the two tone options.

 

Quote

(Can anyone please tell me what the purpose of this rod is?)

I think the rod is to hold the hood insulation in place. There should be another one at the back of the hood too? 

Again, being familiar with 58's, mine have rods that go fully across the hood but others that have 55's would be best to chime in here. (most of the active guys are away at the National I think so be patient)

 

What I might be able to help you out with, I have an NOS hood trim piece for the bomb sight you might be interested in. Shoot me a PM if you want some pictures. 

The bomb sight itself is being re-made so they are not hard to get as they are used on both fenders of the 58's too or you might get lucky to find a good used one at a swap meet.

 

As a friendly suggestion, don't take the car too far apart (especially if she is running) unless you have deep pockets and time. I made that mistake on one of mine and it has been years sitting like that as life sometimes does get in the way....... Having more than one car doesn't help either.:wacko:

Looking forward to following along.

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Thank you for that.  I figured the rods held the hood insulation in place.  I will PM you to see what you are talking about.  As far as what I plan for this restoration, I do plan to do a complete tear down.  I don't have deep pockets, but I do have time, patience and persistence.  Take care and thanks again.

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Moving to the hood latch assembly.DSCN2578.JPGI started with this link.  Just remove the 2 bottom bolts.DSCN2579.JPGRemove 3 bolts on both sides.DSCN2580_kindlephoto-85697285.jpgThe part removed from car.DSCN2581.JPG

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Next, remove the front cross brace.

DSCN2582.JPGRemove 5 bolts on both sides.DSCN2583.JPGFinally, remove the attached wireway from clips.DSCN2584.JPGShowing the cross brace removed.  Pretty easy.DSCN2587.JPG

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Both front quarter panels would be next.  Pulling these off were a little difficult.  I advise pulling the doors off first, which would give easy access to the panel bolts.  However, I do not have a garage big enough to fit my car in and I did not want expose my good interior parts to outside elements.  So, I just had to tough it out and be patient.DSCN2728.JPGJust be sure to look for anything along the edges of the quarter panel when removing all bolts.  Do not forget that there is something to unbolt at the most bottom, rear portion of the panel.DSCN2729.JPGDSCN2730_kindlephoto-88116831.jpgShowing both quarter panels removed.  Decided to leave signal light assemblies and ventports attached.  Less parts to keep track of.DSCN2735.JPGFinally, what the car looks like at this point.  This would be another stopping point for me until the next chance I got at working on it.

DSCN2737.JPG

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Moved the car to the driveway about a month later.  It was around this time my wife and I learned we were going to have another baby.  So naturally I wouldn't do much with the car for the next 2 years except to occasionally start it and let run for a few minutes.  Other than that, I would also occasionally sit in the car to just touch it, smell it and imagine her being all done.DSCN2764.JPG

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It drove me crazy seeing the car getting rained on for another 2 years.  The minute I was able to save a little money plus a coupon, I purchased a carport.  This will have to do till I can build a garage.  Progression non-the-less!IMG_20151229_133554.jpg.8a486ac519adca7427ba2748fca1a33e.jpg

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Is the frame of that car port plastic or aluminum?  If aluminum, make sure it is rated for the snow load in your area.  I had one collapse with the first inch of wet snow, creasing the roof on my 93 Regal.  I was lucky it did not break the glass.  If it's plastic, don't take a chance on it over the winter.

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Probably right Ben.  All I can say is they had more snow and Ice than my area last year.  No telling if or when that may happen again.

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18 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

Is the frame of that car port plastic or aluminum?  If aluminum, make sure it is rated for the snow load in your area.  I had one collapse with the first inch of wet snow, creasing the roof on my 93 Regal.  I was lucky it did not break the glass.  If it's plastic, don't take a chance on it over the winter.

How are you.  The frame is steel, 1.27 inch tubular framing.  No plastic or aluminum.  Very strong.  I actually hung off the top of it without an issue.  So I am not worried about snow.  But thanks for the heads up.

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what happens with those is the snow builds up on the tarp between the top frame pieces and the tarp sags, the snow melts and the water left in the sag ends up eventually penetrating the tarp. I ran a piece of 10-2 w/ground between the top frame members and while it still accumulated a little snow/water not enough to be concerned about.   I also ran a piece of 3/4" pvc in the bottom hem of the door to make rolling up easier.

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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

what happens with those is the snow builds up on the tarp between the top frame pieces and the tarp sags, the snow melts and the water left in the sag ends up eventually penetrating the tarp. I ran a piece of 10-2 w/ground between the top frame members and while it still accumulated a little snow/water not enough to be concerned about.   I also ran a piece of 3/4" pvc in the bottom hem of the door to make rolling up easier.

I will definitely follow up on that.  I don't want to take any chances.  This has to last a good while...until we can get a garage built.  Thanks Mr Lamar!

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7 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I will definitely follow up on that.  I don't want to take any chances.  This has to last a good while...until we can get a garage built.  Thanks Mr Lamar!

 

 You can use rope too, probably, I just used what I had on hand one day when they were calling for snow that night.  The tarp will start leaking going into the second year.  When that happens just buy a good tarp and strap over the top .  As you can see I am an expert on these things . :rolleyes::(

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I JUST know Mr. Fitty Fo, YOU are a honest, loyal, & helpful Buick guy, don't know about your being a TARP expert, but maybe,,,,

 

Dale in Indy

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Okay, so after my baby boy gets to an age where he doesn't need the constant attention of an infant, I can now start back up the removal process.  By now, my son had just turned 2.  My daughter is also taking an interest in the Buick and wants to follow me everywhere to help me out.  Of course I am eating this all up.  My daughter and I remove the trunk handle ornament.DSCN3699.JPGVery simple, just remove the 4 bolts inside the trunk.DSCN3701.JPGTrunk handle ornament off the car.DSCN3703.JPG

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So, at this point, I felt it was a good time to move to the inside of the car and begin removing interior parts.  As you can tell, my daughter is now taken an interest in the Buick and is helping out.  I started with the simple stuff.  Hanger clips are first.  My daughter  is showing the location of the clip in comparison  to one of the screw locations of the trim.DSCN3709.JPGShowing the removed clips.  The tape is to retain the screws with clips.DSCN3711.JPG

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