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9 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Just for giggles, I went out to the car and wanted to see if a light socket assembly pulled from the gauge cluster assembly would fit on the ignition assembly.  It fit perfectly.  Now, I am thinking about running a dedicated light bulb to the ignition assembly.  Just need to find an extra light socket.

 

Did some digging, and found this:

 

Good old tri-five merch. Fits up to 57-2CP lamps, which is the dash lamp for the 56. Might be the same for 55? It's a one wire, you would just need to splice into the current wiring harness and clean up either with a butt connector or some good old fashioned electrical tape. Before purchase, you may want to consider measuring the size of the socket hole and see if it is 5/8".

 

You can probably find others, but NAPA only turned up twist on, and so did other chains (RockAuto, etc). Didn't find anything on Bob's, CARS, etc.

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More removals...up next was the windshield wiper switch.  You will have to gently pry the switch away from the rest of the assembly.  I used a probe and did the job just fine.  Just stay away from anything that might scratch.20161016_154026.jpgThe front of the switch will slide out like so.20161016_154037.jpgThis will give you access to the retaining nut.20161016_154122.jpgGrab a pair of needle nose plyers and place the two ends of the needle noses in the slots of the retaining nut.  Unscrew and remove.20161016_154307.jpgOnce the switch assembly detaches from the dash, remove both hoses from assembly.  One cable will remain intact to the switch.  You will need to fish the switch through part of the dash in order to gain freedom from the dash.  This portion of the switch will remain in the car and will be removed later.20161016_173755.jpgShowing part of the windshield wiper switch out of the car.20161016_181624.jpgOverall this task was moderate.  

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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 I think I have had the wool pulled over my eyes. Many years ago someone told me that you have to push in on the washer button and turn right while at the same time pulling out on the switch to remove it.  And I have use that technique to pull many!  Try pushing and pulling at the same time, Yep, I  think I was bamboozled, bet they are still laughing. 

 I have pulled several 55 ignitions that had the the integral lightbulb socket, but never actually looked for the light bulb socket and wiring.  I just checked the 54 and 55 wiring schematics and sure enough it shows on the 54 but not the 55.  It was a really neat feature and I am really curious as to why they stopped doing it in 55.  I checked the 54 product service bulletins and did not see where there had been a problem. 

Kosage,  I can furnish you a light socket and bulb when you get ready to put it all back together. 

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LOL.  Well, at least you removed many using that method without anything breaking (I assume).  It's also a very good possibility that the same man that advised you to remove the switches in this manner, probably knew no other way to do it.  More than one way to skin a cat, right?

 

I appreciate the offer for the light sockets.  When Doug pulled the crank spacer for me, he threw in 2 light sockets as well.  So I should be okay for now.

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On my car, I have a speaker control switch.20160917_153032.jpgIf I had a knob, I would have just simply pulled it off.  This would give you access to the retaining nut.  Unscrew and remove from dash.20161008_152443.jpgShowing the switch removed from dash.  The switch will be removed from car at a later time.  20161008_152426.jpgThis task was easy.

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I would then move on to the most difficult of all the interior removals...the front dash.  20161016_172436.jpgI started with the set of radio braces that also brace the center of the dash in place.20161016_170032.jpgRemove the single bolt at the top of each brace and then remove both bolts on the bottoms of each brace, located at the speaker opening of the dash.20161016_170044.jpgThe passenger side brace will have a wireway attached to a clip.  Remove from clip.20161016_170548.jpgShowing radio braces removed from car. 20161016_180846.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Next would be the steering column brace.20161010_142953.jpgSimply remove both brace-to-dash mounting bolts.  Finally, remove both steering column clamp bolts.  Separate the clamp from steering column and remove the associated rubber liner.  Showing the brace removed from car.1477358875019-229800216.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Another set of dash braces need removal.  This last set of braces are mounted just above the steering column.20161016_171105.jpgEach brace is held on by 2 bolts...1 at the bottom (shown just to the outside of the hanging bolt).20161016_171021.jpgAnd then 1 at the top (of each).  Simply remove bolts in no particular order.  Showing the tubular dash braces outside of car.20161016_180837.jpgOverall, easy task.

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The speedometer is almost impossible to remove with a lot of things still in the way.  We will need to create some space by freeing the rest of the dash from the car.  The last thing that holds the front dash in place are the mounts on the very outsides of the dash.  To gain access to the outer dash mounting bolts, you will first need to partially remove the decorative strips that line the foward part of the door opening.  20161016_172008.jpgRemove screws that line these strips along this edge shown here.  20161016_172036.jpgThere is one screw that is impossible to get to, right between the body of the car and the mounting area of the outer dash to ccompletely remove strips.  On this side in the picture below, mine broke while the one on the other side is still intact.  Don't worry about this as long as you can move these strips out of the way enough to get access to these bolts.20161016_172057.jpgRemove these 3 bolts on both sides of dash.  The dash should now be free enough to move around a bit, but not enough to remove completely out of the car.  However, I now have room to remove the speedometer.  The decorative dash nameplate wil also be removed.20160925_143045.jpgUnscrew the speedometer cable and pull both light sockets from rear of housing.20160925_143129.jpgThe knob for the tripometer and associated foundation should have been detached when removing the tubular dash braces (previous post).20160925_143815.jpgTripometer cable will be removed with speedometer as one assembly.  Remove the 2 inner nuts that holds the speedometer inside the dash.  You can now pull the decorative dash nameplate from the dash.  Now, remove the last nut that retains the speedometer while holding in place.  Carefully remove speedometer aassembly.  Showing speedometer removed from car.20161016_175627.jpgNow showing the dash nameplate removed from car.20161022_203246.jpgOverall, easy task.

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So, just a few little things still need to be done before we are able to remove the whole dash.  First, pull out the signal/high beam indicator light assembly from behind the dash.20161022_165722.jpgRemove the emergency brake indicator light just below that...20161022_165733.jpgand then remove the screw that holds this wireway brace below that.20161022_165345.jpgShowing the rear of dash these last 3 items attach to.20161022_165816.jpgDecided to also remove the shift indicator to make sure it doesn't break when removing the dash.  Just remove the 2 screws and slide out from top of steering column.  Showing the shift indicator removed from car.20161016_181341.jpgOverall, all of these tasks were easy.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Time to remove the front dash.20161016_172436.jpgFirst, remove screws that hold down the steering column firewall seal and pull off the firewall.  20161022_155837.jpgSeal remains on the column and will be removed at a later time.20161022_160545.jpgThe next step was to remove 4 bolts to the steering box in the engine compartment.  The idea behind this is to allow the steering wheel to drop while the steering box raises up, like a seesaw.  Well, after some time of trying to figure out which bolts to remove on the box and with time running out, I opted to abandon that step.  Too bad, it would have made things so much easier.  However, removing the steering column firewall seal gave me just enough play in the steering column.  I rested my chest on the steering wheel while planting my left foot at an angle that would allow me to push off of it.  I put all of my weight onto the steering wheel and pushed off my left foot, pushing the steering column just enough to the passenger's side, that I was able to get enough room between the column and the driver's side body and lift it up and out.  Now, showing the front dash removed from car.20161022_165215.jpgOverall, this task was difficult.  Drop the steering wheel if you can.

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10 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Drop the steering wheel if you can.

You will see as you progress that it is not that hard to remove the steering column jacket and even the whole steering gear before removing the dash.

Be careful with the triangular pad around the jacket at the floor/firewall.  Replacements are available ($$$), but yours looks like a good one.

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It's funny you should mentioned that Mr. Willie.  I was thinking to myself when I was looking for those 4 bolts that hold down the steering box, "I am probably looking right at the bolts' faces and won't even realize it until I start removals in the engine compartment.":blink:

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On October 26, 2016 at 10:53 AM, old-tank said:

You will see as you progress that it is not that hard to remove the steering column jacket and even the whole steering gear before removing the dash.

Be careful with the triangular pad around the jacket at the floor/firewall.  Replacements are available ($$$), but yours looks like a good one.

 

Like Willie said,  be careful with that triangular rubber pad, I was just looking at one one day and thinking about pulling it, and it cracked, right before my eyes. Just kidding, but they are delicate. 

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6 hours ago, wndsofchng06 said:

I've always wondered if there was some sort of chemical that could be applied to sort of re-moisturize/soften and bond parts like that before one removed them.........

 

Lanolin, maybe...?

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On October 28, 2016 at 8:41 PM, JohnD1956 said:

I'd be tempted to try and warm it up with an electric heater for a half hour immediately before removal.

Heat gun or in a pinch the wife's hair dryer woks too

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Didn't get anything done the past weekend in terms of removals.  Spent time with the kids, tore down an old deck and got ready for Halloween.  However, I was able to box up a few things.20161030_135516.jpgEach piece that is removed is boxed up with plenty of saved walmart plastic bags to ensure fragile parts remain safe over time.  Depending on the part, I will also add bubble wrap.  Any associated fasteners and/or miscellaneous pieces go into a labeled zip lock bag and placed in the same box.  The box is then sealed and labeled.  20161030_134616.jpgI do keep a book where I record important information on each specific box/item.  I record the given box number, date of when item was stored, what the box consist of and exactly where it is being stored.  If anything such as location of storage should change, I must update the book.  I created my own labeling system.  The label is broken into 4 parts:

 

1ST

IN: any part accessed from interior

EX: any part accessed from exterior

EC: any part accessed from engine compartment 

TR: any part accessed from trunk

UN: any part accessed from underneath the car

 

2ND

DS: any part accessed from driver's side

PS: any part accessed from passenger's side

C: any part accessed from center of car

 

3RD

F: any part accessed from front of car

R: any part accessed from rear of car

 

4TH

this contains a 4 digit number that gives the order in which each part is removed.  In the case where 1 item is an assembly that will be broken down into smaller pieces at the later time of restoration, each sub-part will be labeled with the same part number with the addition of a 3 digit number.  This 3 digit number will be given in the order of the removal from the larger assembly.

 

All boxes are placed on my shelving unit in my garage and much larger items are placed inside my locked shed.20160908_164852.jpgI do not take anything for granted.  This is my defense against losing pieces, forgetting where the part is installed at and breakage.  This process allows me to take my time and keep an organized and clean workspace.  

 

I also back up everything done on this car with plenty of pictures and video if necessary.  If you can't tell already, this forum has become my diary which is a tool also.

 

Finally, I have you all, to whom have given much advice, encouragement and in some cases, parts that I am looking for to aid in my process.  Thank God removing things from a car doesn't cost me anything, which gives me the time and money to search and purchase the accessories I need to make this car just like my Dad's/Grandad's buick.  Once the time comes for restoration and installation, I will take it one task at a time.

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Kosage, you don't have any relatives who are librarians by any chance...?  ^_^

 

Very organized disassembly and cataloging of parts.  One suggestion that I have would be to use newspaper rather than plastic as the packing material.  The paper (and cardboard box) will act as a desiccant and help keep moisture under control due to condensation, since the garage is likely not temperature controlled.

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13 hours ago, EmTee said:

Kosage, you don't have any relatives who are librarians by any chance...?  ^_^

 

Very organized disassembly and cataloging of parts.  One suggestion that I have would be to use newspaper rather than plastic as the packing material.  The paper (and cardboard box) will act as a desiccant and help keep moisture under control due to condensation, since the garage is likely not temperature controlled.

No librarians that I know of, but I will take that as a compliment.:D  I didn't even think about using newspaper instead of plastic bags.  That's a good idea and will use it.  Thank you.

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Crank pulley, compliments of Matt. 20161105_191426.jpgCrank pulley with associated crank pulley spacer, compliments of Doug.20161105_191442.jpgThis pulley and spacer will give me the 3rd groove needed to operate the AC system.  I am now just 2 steps from a complete factory AC system.  Just need the scoop assembly and set of clear ducts.

 

Also, a couple of factory light sockets, compliments of Doug.20161105_191458.jpgOne of these light sockets will serve as illumination for the ignition switch, a feature of the 54 buick, but for whatever reason, was deleted on the 55 buick.  I decided to bring it back for my car.

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So finally...I was able to do a little something on the Buick.  This little something was removing the defroster duct that is mounted to the firewall.20161126_163454.jpgThis duct is only mounted at 2 spots.  The first spot is at the driver's side end of the duct where an adjustable hose clamp and L- bracket are used for mounting.  I previously removed the hose clamp when removing the defroster terminals, so you are already half way done with removing the duct.20161126_163529.jpgThe last mount is a simple screw which is accessed inside the duct through this outlet.20161126_163538.jpgUnscrew and finally wiggle the passenger's side end of the duct off of the flex hose.  Showing the duct removed from car.20161126_163826.jpgOverall, an easy task.

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Back on the Buick again!  Made a decent amount of removals yesterday.  Started with the set of cables (5 in all) that control the air vents in the car.  Keep a note in the manner in which the cables are layed out in the car.20161211_122940.jpgAt the location of each vent, the cable is held in place at its end by a small clamp and then the wired loop is hooked onto a small shaft.  Simply loosen the clamp and then take your finger and slide the wire loop off of the shaft.  You will do this in 5 different places.  Be sure both ends of each cable is labeled.  Here at rear side of vent box...20161211_123049.jpghere at forward side of vent box...20161211_123100.jpghere at the ranco valve...20161211_123141.jpghere at passenger's side firewall vent...20161211_123239.jpgand here at driver's side firewall vent.20161211_123224.jpgFinally, just remove the small bracket secured to the firewall.  You will see this in the first picture holding 3 of the cables in place.  Showing cables removed from car.20161211_124313.jpgOverall, easy task.

Edited by Kosage Chavis
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Will do Mr Willie.  When the time comes, I will duplicate the cables like you did yours.  Also, please school me.  How can you tell that the ranco valve is leaking?  Is it the discoloration on the insulation just underneath?  Finally, how does the ranco valve function?  Thank you.

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Next, I removed the wiper fluid supply hoses that "tee" off to the wiper fluid terminals.  Just remove at 3 places. Removed at passenger's side wiper fluid terminal...20161211_125338.jpghere at the driver's side wiper fluid terminal...20161211_125400.jpgand here at the tee, just before the main line penetrates the firewall.20161211_125536.jpg Showing the wiper fluid hoses removed from car.20161211_125618.jpg  Overall, easy task.

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18 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

How can you tell that the ranco valve is leaking?  Is it the discoloration on the insulation just underneath?  Finally, how does the ranco valve function?

Rust and corrosion on the unit.  The ranco valve is supposed to help maintain a constant temperature in the car...never worked any better than lesser cars without.  A $10 seal from NAPA will fix (or $100+ for send off rebuild), but it is real tedious to change.  I can give additional info when you are ready.

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8 hours ago, old-tank said:

Rust and corrosion on the unit.  The ranco valve is supposed to help maintain a constant temperature in the car...never worked any better than lesser cars without.  A $10 seal from NAPA will fix (or $100+ for send off rebuild), but it is real tedious to change.  I can give additional info when you are ready.

As always Mr Willie, I appreciate your advice and will seek you out when it's time.

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I then moved to the removal of the vent diverter box.20161211_133045.jpgRemove the 4 screws to release the capillary tube and grill.  This will also release the kick panel.  My kick panel was dry rotted and in pieces.20161211_133112.jpgShowing the kick panel removed.  Looks like the Dead Sea scrolls.20161211_134201.jpgShowing the pieces of the kick panel put together.  I will keep to template another.20161211_134055.jpgIt's not necessary to remove the duct splitter at the top of the vent diverter box, but if you choose, just remove 4 screws at its flange and pull off.20161211_134644.jpgRemove 6 bolts at the flange of the diverter box (3 on each side).  Grab a flat edge and gently pry off the diverter box at the flange.  Be sure to pry a little each time at different points at the flange to avoid warping.20161211_134852.jpgShowing diverter box area after removal.20161211_140328.jpgShowing vent diverter box assembly removed from car.20161211_140723.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Next, I removed both firewall vent grills. This is a picture of the passenger's side grill.  Just remove 4 screws.20161211_140848.jpgBelow is a picture of the driver's side grill. The bottom flap of this grill is partially secured by the steering collar seal.  In my case, the steering collar seal had already been unattached during a previous removal.  That should just leave you with 2 screws to remove and the grill should come right out.20161211_141552.jpgBelow, showing how the top screws on the steering collar seal secure the bottom flap of the grill.20161211_141605.jpgShowing both grills removed from car.20161211_142252.jpgOverall, easy task.

 

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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