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46 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Wow, that price makes me regret every choice I've made in the last two years.

 

That is the price for some of the chrome.  It won't sell for that.   I'm thinking 25k in the current world.   Ed can correct me down 10k.

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10 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

That is the price for some of the chrome.  It won't sell for that.   I'm thinking 25k in the current world.   Ed can correct me down 10k.


It will bring 28-32 in current condition........

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  • 10 months later...
On 4/5/2020 at 2:14 PM, alsancle said:

 

That is the price for some of the chrome.  It won't sell for that.   I'm thinking 25k in the current world.   Ed can correct me down 10k.

 

 

I have to bring this to the top since I just noticed it sold for 25k on the dot and Ed was off by 10k.  😁

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The then conservator of this magnificent '32 KB showed it at the 1996 LCOC Eastern National Meet in Dearborn, MI.   When the owner was showing a group of us and describing that it was a low mileage original including the interior, having that shudder of recognition one gets when one has the opportunity to see such a perfectly preserved original.   The same meet included a 1935 Lincoln K five passenger sedan that was just as wonderfully preserved.    Also attending that meet were Bob Bourke and Tucker Madawick, both design industry legends.

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Lincoln built a lot of great cars........some attractive, many not so much. The KB is a fantastic platform.

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15 hours ago, md murray said:

Is it me or does the body work just seem to flow better on that 1933 than this 1934? I guess it's apples and oranges but the tall green house just looks a little clumsy by comparison.

LIN.jpg

This 1934 has the series-custom Willoughby Type 285 seven passenger limousine body, priced at $5,600, 77 units built.   Willoughby bodies tend to be very conservatively styled, think the Panel Brougham which Lincoln catalogued to the end of Model K production.  

 

Regarding the change from the 1932 KB hood doors to the 1933 louvers:  because the 1933 was the first to have streamlining applied to the styling, they may have been uncomfortable with the slanted hood doors, fearful their customer's conservative taste consider the feature a bit too much.  Saving a minor amount of money on tooling and production may have played a part though given Lincoln was Edsel Ford's vanity project, bleeding red ink by the gallon, difficult to believe financial loss was even a consideration.       

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3 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

This 1934 has the series-custom Willoughby Type 285 seven passenger limousine body, priced at $5,600, 77 units built.   Willoughby bodies tend to be very conservatively styled, think the Panel Brougham which Lincoln catalogued to the end of Model K production.  

 

Regarding the change from the 1932 KB hood doors to the 1933 louvers:  because the 1933 was the first to have streamlining applied to the styling, they may have been uncomfortable with the slanted hood doors, fearful their customer's conservative taste consider the feature a bit too much.  Saving a minor amount of money on tooling and production may have played a part though given Lincoln was Edsel Ford's vanity project, bleeding red ink by the gallon, difficult to believe financial loss was even a consideration.       

 

Steve,   The KB was 32/33,  did the wheelbase change at all in 34?

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1 minute ago, alsancle said:

 

Steve,   The KB was 32/33,  did the wheelbase change at all in 34?

AJ: Lincoln held over the 136" and 145" wheelbases for 1934 of the prior 1933 KA and KB respectively, still designated them as such but added Series 521 to the KA and Series 271 to the KB.  Essentially, the chassis was being rationalized to a single series with the 1933 KA Twelve 381.7 ci enlarged to the 414 ci twelve built through the end of the 1939 Model K.  For 1935, all became Model K, the 136" wb Series 301; the 145" wb Series 541.  For 1936, all still Model K, all regardless of wheelbase Series 300.  The 1937-'39 simply Model K, no series designations.  Edsel Ford was playing out whatever market still existed for the grandiose Lincolns: 1937: 977; 1938: 416; 1939: 133.  Were it not for the independent wealth of the Fords and willingness of Edsel to continue production and probably tolerance by his increasingly paranoid, tyrannical father Henry, Lincoln would have expired by 1936. 

 

As long as Packard continued their Twelve and Cadillac the Sixteen, Edsel had justification to continue the Model K.  After all, Fords wanted to continue to be perceived as one of the "Big Three" and no company could claim to do so without a top-line luxury car.  Chrysler skirted the issue with their late 1930's Custom Imperials which weren't much more than lwb versions of medium-priced Imperials and other eight cylinder Chryslers.   The democratization of the owner-driven luxury car being lead by the Cadillac 60 allowed Chrysler to take this escape route too.

 

Ask for a simple answer, get a dissertation...

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