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55 Century 66R Project


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Dad was a Buick dealership general manager, worked his way up from grease man, well one day he handed me a MINI DYNAFLOW piece. It was basically a miniature converter, as I recall it as approx. 6-8 inches in diameter, was made of SEE-THRU plastic, with COLORED fluid inside. It had as I recall a small crank on one side and a round disc or ball on the other side. You would crank it and FEEL THE TORQUE/PULL. I have looked for years to find one at a swap meet, but never have. You could see the vanes inside too.

Do any of you have one, or recall seeing such?

Dale in Indy

Edited by smithbrother (see edit history)
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OK, the good news, the bad news and then the good news. I did the pressure tests this morning. (The Good News) All pressures were in factory spec. Front pump, Drive, Low, Lube pressure, Reverse and stator functioned properly. Then I decided to check the rear pump. Instead of turning it with a speed handle and socket like the book shows, I used the man killer drill. (From behind you have to turn it counter clockwise) (The Bad News) I turned the drill on and in a few seconds it pulled the drill motor, way down and oil flew out of my band adjustment access hole and I shut it down. I had the selector in Reverse! (Dumb) (The book says put it in neutral) I shifted it to neutral and ran the test again. This time my rear pump pressure came up normally.

I ran the all the tests again and now my Reverse pressure is half of what it was. I blew something out in the trans! (Oil flying out of the band adjust access hole was a clue) (The Good News) I drained out the oil and turned the trans upside down. After removing the valve body and identifying the reverse ports I inspected all the gaskets looking for a blown out area. I didn’t find anything at first. I then realized that the one gasket was barley covering the reverse pressure port. I got out the original gasket that was in the trans and it was the same, very close to the edge of the port. As they gave me multiple gaskets in the kit for different year cars I just matched up what came out. Wrong! It was the wrong gasket! I dug through the other new gaskets and found one to cover this area completely. By turning the rear pump while it was in reverse must have deadheaded the pump and blew out that small contact area of the gasket. It is better I find this out now than after it is in the car. Now I need to call and get some more gaskets and try again. Mud

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These tests do not guarantee that the trans will work perfectly but I feel a lot more confident that it will. If anyone would like to use this setup, I would be willing to let any BCA member use it. Just pay shipping and insurance on it. Thanks, Mud

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Great Video. I missed the part where you mentioned what the RPM of the trans was. Were you were able to go from Low to Reverse above the 450 idle without dropping the reverse band strut? Also was the oil passing the adjustment screw expected and normal?

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Great Video. I missed the part where you mentioned what the RPM of the trans was. Were you were able to go from Low to Reverse above the 450 idle without dropping the reverse band strut? Also was the oil passing the adjustment screw expected and normal?

The drill free speed is 450 rpm. It was pulling it way down in low and reverse. I doubt I had 350 rpm under load. The leakage you see coming up around the piston area is not piston leakage. When the drill stops the piston holds the lever until I shift it out of that gear. The valve body, with the selector spool and relief valves, are directly under these pistons. Any leakage around the spools and extra oil above relief pressure will be dumped in this area. I checked both pistons with air and they do not leak down.

(You mentioned shifting from Low to Reverse above the 450 idle causing dropping the reverse band strut) Is this a common problem? I don’t think I had enough rpm to have this occur. Mud

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I don't know how common it is. I know it happened to me. In that circumstance I was considerably above idle when it occurred. I know that now I wait till I have as slow an idle as possible before putting my 56 Super in reverse. I'm probably just gun-shy, and over cautious, bu 56 Roadmaster Model 72's are awful heavy to push by hand. On your video the screaming of the drill had me thinking it was spinning around 12 - 1500 RPM.

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Mud, Great video! very cool. Love the test set up. Would like to see the "man killer" drill in the set up as well and how you attached it all for the running of the tests.

OK, here is the man killer video.

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The Dynaflow is done except I am waiting for the correct torque converter cover bolts. It is time to start on that engine!:D

Mud, may I ask a favor? If you think it is original, can you post a close up pic of the color paint on you engine.? Is that the same color the 56 should be?

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Mud, may I ask a favor? If you think it is original, can you post a close up pic of the color paint on you engine.? Is that the same color the 56 should be?

I thought all early V8’s were the same color. I found out that the engine is not a virgin. :mad: It has been apart before. I don’t think it has been repainted though. I am uploading a video right now of the first stage of disassembly. The valve covers may be the best color. When I find them I will get a picture. Mud

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Mud,

I don't wanna be a "change the oil and drive it guy", but when I rebuilt the engine out of Willie's parts car, there had obviously been rats living in the engine and peeing (etc) in the cylinders. There were giant pits in mine. That engine looks pretty darn good to me.

Most of us (one person excepted whom I shan't name) rebuild our engines to specs that we will never need. I am not trying to talk you out of doing a fine job, but don't exceed the need. Triple check the bores, and reseal to prevent leaks.

Just my opinion, others may vary.

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I definitely have to shift gears on this engine. I spent 20 + years rebuilding mostly Ag diesel engines with a few gas and automotive engines mixed in. Diesel engines are very un-forgiving when it comes to tolerances as far as cylinder wall wear. (They just won’t start when they’re cold) On the other hand the last engine I worked on was our 1926 Model T Ford. They will run fine with a lot of slop in the cylinders. When I get her all torn down I will see what needs to be replaced. Mud

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Rebuilding my Buick's engine was the most satisfying chore of my time in this hobby. Deciding what's okay and what needs replacing is something that's learned only by experience. I sought lots of grey-haired advice at the time. It ended up needing pistons, lifters, some valves, and a camshaft. I think the crank was pretty good. Getting all those clean lumps and bits back from the machine shop was like Christmas morning. That was close to 30 years ago.

As I put it all back together, I made a fuss about painting everything as correctly as I could. The original-type decals and stickers weren't really available then. In the ensuing decades, antifreeze and brake fluid leaks and the simple march of time have taken their toll on the cosmetics. I still haven't driven the car a hundred miles. Now the engine looks about right for a good used car - which is the standard that I eventually hope to achieve. Not judge-worthy, just respectable and fun.

I've rebuilt a couple of engines since then, neither of which needed as much work as this 364. They were all good experiences and none have since failed. Guess I'm just careful enough.

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My older boy and I took a shot at replacing bearings in an 87 3.8 V6 once. Although I've watched this done by others this was really my first attempt. It lasted one month and then started knocking. We never did tear it down again so I don't know where we went wrong.

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What do you Illinoisians use for antifreeze - maple syrup? The innards of my nailhead (and my '56 Dodge 270 and my '73 MGB 1800) didn't look anything like that.

By the way, what does a machine shop do when they "boil out" or "hot tank" an engine block? Do they use a special solution and does it really involve heating to boiling temperature? I've had this done to each of the engines I've work on but never thought to ask the shop what they actually did.

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I just got back from power washing the block and heads. I had a brown river flowing out of the water jackets! I hope to get it over to the machine shop this week for further evaluation and cost. At the very least I want the block and heads boiled out so no hidden crud will spoil the rebuild. Mud

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Tool love is a natural urge for healthy men. Don't be ashamed but keep it private. At various times, I've been smitten with my Sawzall, my cordless drywall screwdriver, and the coolest brake assembly tool. The love of my life though remains my table saw.

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Having worked for Tractor Supply for 15 years, owning my own True Value hardware for nearly 25 years, well, it was a natural to collect NEEDED tools.

If I were to put a finger on my prized tool/tools, well, it would be my 65 year old cast iron Delta/Milwaukee 14" floor band saw. It has a gear reduction, so will cut both wood, and metal, it just won't quit. One cheap power tool I find myself using DAILY is a 1" X 30" bench belt sander. The tasks are endless that it performs, and it too just won't quit.

Dale in Indy

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I received a call from the machine shop today. They said it would take at least .030 oversize to clean up the block. (They will do a rough cut and call me) And they will have to go .010 under on the crank. He said whomever did the engine work last time cut the ridge too deep with the ridge reamer. (That is why I thought it was in pretty good shape as there was no ring ridge) Ca-ching $$$$$$ Mud :(

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