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55 Century 66R Project


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Ok Stealthbob, If I was a guessing man, I would guess that they would be put there to know that those bolts have been torqued to spec. for assembly. I think by looking at the picture, that is the valve body and it will be inside the pan, unviewable. Just a guess, I reckon...

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Ok Stealthbob, If I was a guessing man, I would guess that they would be put there to know that those bolts have been torqued to spec. for assembly. I think by looking at the picture, that is the valve body and it will be inside the pan, unviewable. Just a guess, I reckon...

Yea but why the top of the bolt and the base as well...almost as if it is like a wax seal to check for tampering or a loosening of some kind. That doesn't really fit either because the base marks are not all lined up with the mark on the bolt.

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A poster on another forum had written about that he had broken one of the accumulators off of his Dynaflow. Apparently it happened because the car had been lowered and he hit something while driving. Seeing how they are cast iron and are bolted to the aluminum part of the valve body housing does not appear to be a good scenario. Maybe he got lucky and only snapped the bolts.

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I learned to mark my bolts as I set torque on them when I was the service manager at an Ag dealership. The service manager was in a severe car accident and was paralyzed from the waist down. I was head mechanic in the morning and in the afternoon I was service manager and head mechanic. After that everything I set torque on or adjusted (Like Valves) were marked in some way or tagged. I have never had so many interruptions in my life as trying to do both jobs at once. It helps to mark them so you don’t miss any or forget where you were. The reason the sides are marked is that I started at a lower torque and move up so I marked them in different locations. Mud

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I learned to mark my bolts as I set torque on them when I was the service manager at an Ag dealership. The service manager was in a severe car accident and was paralyzed from the waist down. I was head mechanic in the morning and in the afternoon I was service manager and head mechanic. After that everything I set torque on or adjusted (Like Valves) were marked in some way or tagged. I have never had so many interruptions in my life as trying to do both jobs at once. It helps to mark them so you don’t miss any or forget where you were. The reason the sides are marked is that I started at a lower torque and move up so I marked them in different locations. Mud

The things you learn...thanks man.

You realize now that my project will carry the same marks.....

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The pan looks completely functional. All you would need to do is use metal body filler to make perfect....can't see it anyway...but you know it's there...and besides the car is just a driver, right?...those toads that you missed with the tires will see it...and tell...:D

Willie

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just started working on the torque converter tonight. About 10 minutes in to it I hit a roadblock. I need a clutch style socket to remove the Stator piston. Of all the tools I own, I do not have a clutch head socket. I have a few small clutch head bits in my bit assortment but no large ones. I hope I can find one tomorrow or my Saturday will be wasted. Ugh!

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I went to three auto parts stores, Lowe’s, Farm & Fleet and finally found a small set with a set of clutch head bits at Menard’s for $9.00. I was able to get it apart and replace the seal. Now I discovered another problem. I was checking the stator end play inside the converter and found It was .100. It should be .018 - .029. After checking my Buick parts book I discovered that my select fit washers that go behind the thrust washer are missing. The wear pattern shows they were never there. I checked my disassembly photos and confirmed that they were not installed. It is a wonder it even worked. I hope Fatsco has them or I will be looking for a donor.

Mud
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This is the unedited version. I bumped the tri pod. Oops! I was so hoping that this was a virgin trans but it obviously is not. As I keep finding things wrong. It sure helps to have the Buick Parts Manual or you could easily miss this stuff as the manual has some vague areas.

I had a little time to clean up the oil cooler and lines. The cooler was so pretty after bead blasting; I didn’t have the heart to paint it. So I gave it two coats of Eastwoods bare metal satin clear. Oh I forgot, I am building a driver, I am building a driver……………. Mud

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Leave the cooler like it is. I used a NOS cooler that had black paint(?)...the paint was soon dissolved by transmission fluid.

Past omissions and modifications will drive you crazy. At least you did not have to remove the transmission to find the problem. The biggest modification on my last one was a 1956 drum (uses 6 clutch pairs) substituted for the 1955 drum (uses 5 clutch pairs)...it was put together with 5...

Willie

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  • 2 weeks later...

It is 6:52 A.M. Christmas eve. I haven’t had a day off to work on the 55 Trans for a week or two. The in-laws won’t be here till 1:00 P.M. I’m going out to the garage to spend some quality time with my DYNAFLOW. Merry Christmas everybody! ;)

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It is 6:52 A.M. Christmas eve. I haven’t had a day off to work on the 55 Trans for a week or two. The in-laws won’t be here till 1:00 P.M. I’m going out to the garage to spend some quality time with my DYNAFLOW. Merry Christmas everybody! ;)

So how late do the in-laws stay? You think you can avoid them the entire time?:D:D

Anyway look forward to your update on the progress!

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Loving this part of the thread...its the shop tips I see in your pics that are neat. Stuff like the little base you made right to the way you secured it to do the Torque Converter.

I look forward to your method of testing for pressures.

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My buddy Chris and I have been bantering back and forth about Restored VS Street Rods since 1974. We worked at the Sears Automotive Center in Oakbrook Il. together. It is all in fun. He has a 1937 Packard that he keeps 100% original. And if I had the time and $, my next car would definitely be a modified 55 Buick Century. I look at it this way. For every guy that makes a rod out of a 55 Century, (or any other car) it makes the originals worth that much more! It’s all about having fun. Mud

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MUD, okay, now you've gone over the top. We've all been watching your progress here, thinking, yeah I could take a shot at servicing my own Dynaflow. Then you spring this test gauge rig and drive adapter on us. Wait a minute, you actually know what you're doing! Not fair!

Nevertheless, I'll be very interesting in reading how you're setting this up and what results you'll get from it. That great lump of metal sure looks good; it'll be a shame to stuff it up under the car and out of sight.

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MUD, okay, now you've gone over the top. We've all been watching your progress here, thinking, yeah I could take a shot at servicing my own Dynaflow. Then you spring this test gauge rig and drive adapter on us. Wait a minute, you actually know what you're doing! Not fair!

LOL!!:) I second that! I was thinking the EXACT same thing!! All but dashed my dreams of someday tearing into my Dynaflow. In all seriousness though, I'm looking forward to seeing your test procedure Mud. Any chance of taking some video of that?

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Mr Mud

Now that is impressive! I did good to check pressures with one gauge in 3 or 4 places with the transmission in the car (which is what you should do before removing the dynaflow). I tried turning mine by hand, but could not demonstrate any pressures....just tranny fluid leaking at the torque ball.

Willie

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