Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Roger,

Interesting that tin can be applied at home.  Is it an electrostatic application or is it just a "bath" that applies tin via immersion?  Are you using "clips" to hold the lines to the frame?  If so, are they like the factory clips?  

 

Randy

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Indeed, it's just a bath. The parts must be immersed for 1 minute and they are getting that coating. It's like magic!

The lines are held with clips pushed into holes in the frame. I don't know how the factory clips are looking; anyway, I had to think practically v/s correctness: some lines are soft soldered to my clips for simplification and good routing.

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Another sub-assembly is ready: the rear axle. Before painting, the brake lines have been fabricated as well as the emergency brake cable. Due to a wrong interpretation from a picture, I had already done since years the cable, but in 2 pieces. I realized my error as the cable is not attached to the equalizer, but is going from one wheel to the other through that equalizer.

Now, everything is grease and assembled; the emergency brake is functioning. It is not sure it will be operable from inside the car because the cable is doing a sharp curve over a pulley at the firewall; the cable is probably too stiff.

I began also to paint all the small pieces which are ready like the booster/master cylinder, battery tray with the battery, and so on. Tedious, but rewarding.

 

938 rear axle.JPG

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Roger

I have been following your build for few years now and I am always amazed at your talent and extreme attention to detail. Have you ever considered building a rotisserie for your project? With your chassis and or body mounted on a rotisserie and photographed  in front of a garage or auto shop no one would be able to tell that this is a 1/12 scale Continental .

Alex D.

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Alex, thanks for your kind comments! I'm in fact using an art support for some work (See the picture), but we are far away from a rotisserie. Indeed, I never thought at that possibility; even if such a construction would not take too much time, it's not my goal.

735 Support.JPG

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HOLY MOLY! There is absolutely nothing on that model that would lead me to doubt that it is a real, full scale car except for the table it is on.

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52 minutes ago, Paulie9fingers said:

I just can't get enough of this, always amazing

I am totally with you on that. I could look at it all day long with great admiration for the builder.

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42 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

HOLY MOLY! There is absolutely nothing on that model that would lead me to doubt that it is a real, full scale car except for the table it is on.

How do we really know it's just a table top. Haven't seen that quarter in awhile. 

The amazing things that Roger does, he could be fooling us all and it's really a full size car. ;)

  • Haha 3

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Roger,

 

Your rear end assembly is just like the  "real deal".  Right down to the emergency brake cable.  Making it a "functioning" cable which can be (if the wire isn't too stiff) just goes over the edge !  I am imagining stepping on the E brake pedal and the cable is pulled.  Just toooooooooooo much! 

 

Amazing.  Everything on this model is just like the 1:1 car, only in miniature, with all of the detail.   Some day, this car,  the Avanit and the Toronado  need to go into a museum where all can see these masterpieces.  Unless an individual were following this thread, there would be no comprehension of how this model came to be.  SO MUCH DETAIL and effort to produce the parts.  Body men at paint and body shops have a hard enough time doing 1:1 cars, forming and shaping fenders, hoods, rocker and quarter panels and other parts,  but doing it in 1:12 is absolutely an amazement that really is  a loftier work of art. 

 

Roger, what planet are you on loan from?  Because this work is truly "out of this world".     

 

Randy

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Roger,

 

Look into SURGICAL Cable that is used by Orthopedic Surgeons.  My father, an orthopedic surgeon,  did operations that required very small cable.  I later used it on some of my model making.  It is strong but very pliant.  I am sure that you have a lot of sources for materials and you may have researched this type of cable.  As a matter of fact, if I recall, it was made in Switzerland. Now it may be made in many different countries.  It  came on a spool in different MM thicknesses.  If you know a surgeon in your area, I am sure that he (or she) can shed some light on the type of cable I am talking about. Just a thought.

 

Randy

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Wow! So many comments because of a little bit paint! Sorry about the quarter: I just forget to place it because now, most of the parts or elements I'm picturing are already here unpainted. For the next picture, I had the feeling it was necessary, especially for Randy: as you can see on that picture, the cable coming from the firewall is making a turn of about 90° to go down to a lever. The pulley at the end if that assembly has a diameter of 3.5 mm (0.137") and the cable is not quite willing to follow that small radius. I ignore if that surgical cable would be more compliant; further is must be soft soldered at the end of the chromed handle. If the e-brake would be absolutely necessary, I may think twice about that.

all three models have an e-brake; as the handle is near the center console on the Avanti, it cannot be used. On the Toronado, the brake is actuated by a pedal, like the original. And this system is working without problem since years. On that model, it was necessary: as the idea was to motorize the car with an electric motor, I put ball bearings at all wheels. If a table is not perfectly horizontal, the model is moving...That e-brake is released like the right car with a lever. As pedal and lever are on the left side near the kick panel, their utilisation is quite easy.

I'm also adding a small picture from the Toronado model to show e-brake pedal (hardly visible) and the release lever.

Hand brake lever.JPG

Tableau de bord.JPG

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For 2 weeks, on February first, I got a laser treatment to my right eye, to remove the effect of a secondary cataract. Since some time, I had a bad eye sight, especially during driving. By closing the left eye, I had the impression that there was a very heavy fog and I had the feeling that the left eye had the normal vision. After the intervention, it was almost like night and day! Now, I realize that the left eye has not a so good vision than the right one and I may treat that eye too in a not so distant future.

Usually, I don’t relate here my little health problems, but this one had an influence on the model: before the intervention, I prepared the body as well as I could. Now, I’m seeing several flaws which need a correction…Another reason for the issues was probably not enough time to let dry the various products I’m using. Now, I’m back to the body preparation…

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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Thanks for the wishes! This kind of intervention is giving results almost immediately and is painless. On the other side, cataract surgery (by replacing the aged lenses which I had 4 years ago) is more risky; one of 1000 may get bad.

Dileep, unfortunately you will not see more models: I decided this one is the last one.

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Roger,

 

That shot of the Toronado.......Unless you look closely at the upholstery, there is NO Clue that this is a 1:12 model.  The dash, steering wheel, console is so realistic.  I can just imagine how the Continental will look when finished.  Glad that you got your eye tended to.  It is great to see clearly.  We take that for granted until we don't have that ability any longer.  My mom got her cataracts removed  when she was 75.  THREW HER GLASSES AWAY ! !  Modern Medicine.

 

Randy 

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