Jump to content

1933 Reo Flying Cloud Cpe F/B Michigan $5,800


Hudsy Wudsy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here's a link to a '33 Reo coupe that's for sale on Facebook in Michigan: 

Marketplace - 1933 Reo Flying Cloud | Facebook

 

I'm struck by that classy body mold line on the front of the sail panel -- beautiful.

 

No photo description available.

 

The seller suggests that, god forbid, you might want to make a sweet rod out of it!

Here's a pic of another '33 coupe from Google:

6_1.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Complete car... well worth the money... I would put it back together with my budget... and drive it as an original....  unmolested... It ia a good year for Reo   nice body style... that is what the son is saying.. he likes the body style.. hot rod, is just the way younger folks think of these cars... they don't know how much joy you can get.. by stepping back in time and going for a drive... having the ride be the goal and Not the destination.....  It is called going for a Joy ride... that was the fun, when Life was lived at a slower pace.. and we enjoyed the simple things in Life.... real nice looking car at a fair price... 

Edited by sunnybaba (see edit history)
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Neat car but it's too bad that it fell into greasy hands. If it were in an unmolested state, the price would be fine but this guy devalued the car by scattering its components and will take a loss for doing so. With the head removed and top end exposed, no doubt the the bore and valves are rusty. Just sourcing out the correct fasteners would be an added headache to putting it together.  Something presented to me in a pile of scattered parts and disassembly is a turn off for me unless it was priced in the low  hundreds, not thousands.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I often wonder what the goal is of some people, their mindset, when they just start taking a car apart haphazardly in a way that makes no sense.  We all know stalled projects but so many of these cars just end up as a pile of parts scattered everywhere because they get taken apart that way. I like this car but know I would need a couple full days going through every box of unlabeled parts scattered about, taking everything that even looked remotely like it went to this car, just in hopes some big ticket items that were removed haven't been lost to time. Was the head and manifolds shipped off for repair rebuild? Trim pieces and hardware?  After years and years and getting shuffled around the barn who knows what you'll end up needing. Such a shame as that as why it becomes easier to hotrod for many people then rebuild if the unobtanium pieces are gone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back around 2010/2011 this car was for sale.   It is the Reo Royale Coupe on the 135" wheelbase with the 359, nine main, 125HP straight straight eight.

 

Basically a big version of the subject car in much better shape.   It was bought by a collector in Ohio and I still don't believe it has been restored.    Much much better car all around.

 

The subject car will probably end up as a hot rod or scrap metal.

 

post-31305-143138827993_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I often wonder what the goal is of some people, their mindset, when they just start taking a car apart haphazardly in a way that makes no sense.  We all know stalled projects but so many of these cars just end up as a pile of parts scattered everywhere because they get taken apart that way. I like this car but know I would need a couple full days going through every box of unlabeled parts scattered about, taking everything that even looked remotely like it went to this car, just in hopes some big ticket items that were removed haven't been lost to time. Was the head and manifolds shipped off for repair rebuild? Trim pieces and hardware?  After years and years and getting shuffled around the barn who knows what you'll end up needing. Such a shame as that as why it becomes easier to hotrod for many people then rebuild if the unobtanium pieces are gone.

BB,

          You are right.  The devil's in the details.  I have purchased many disassembled projects over the years.  Usually all the large components are included (engine, trans, etc.) but the trouble comes when you start looking for all the tiny bits that are almost impossible to find today, like the window trim or all the little clips to hold the bright garnish in place, dash knob escutcheons, etc. 

That's where it all goes bad for me. Ugh!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/25/2021 at 12:08 PM, kingrudy said:

IMO cars end up like this when the owner over estimates his time, talent and contents of his wallet. Then becomes bored and decides to move on to the next mess. 

Yes to all of that, but I'll add that a time also comes when they are embarrassed by the mess that they made of the car and they can't get rid of it soon enough. That's when they called Windy Hills, French Lake or any of the many junk yards that rapidly make things disappear.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a sickness - I feel compelled to rescue unfinished projects like this. Plus I think the styling is really cool. This one is calling me. If it were nearby I would have already gone with cash in hand. Much less cash than the asking price though. Thankfully it is not nearby because bringing it home would result in some not insignificant domestic challenges. 

 

It is really hard to sell a pile of parts like this. I hope someone steps up and saves it.  I know you guys are right when you say it may end up as scrap or a hot rod though. 🙁

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank goodness: (1) the car is too far away from me and; (2) I have no room for another car.

 

Otherwise, I'd be tempted to bring it to stock condition but put in a modern 6 cylinder engine & transmission. The REO would be a daily driver, and the only way you'd notice it was not stock would be to look under the hood.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...