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Thanks for posting Bob, that's a great plug and a neat story to go along with it.  Eyquem was indeed one of the premier spark plug manufacturers in France and their plugs were widely distributed throughout Europe.  Some were even imported into the US in the early 1900s. Here is a neat piece of Eyquem advertising -

Terry

Eyquen poster.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Like it when stuff shows up on the door-step!   Doesn't happen often.   Years ago a Hershey vendor sent me a box of plugs that contained some real treasures.   I got a phone call from him and he said he had found some plugs and knew I collected.  I'd often stopped at his spot at Hershey and talked plugs while looking at all his early brass era goodies.   We'd traded contact info and he said he would keep an eye open for some.   He came through in a big way!  I didn't expect much, but when the box arrived, among that shoe-box full were some really great additions to my collection.  The majority of them dated prior to 1910 and many were NOS.   I was overwhelmed!   Then, about two weeks later, another little package showed up-one he had forgot to put back in the box before mailing it.   It was the best one of them all.  This one again was NOS and s manufactured in Cleveland Ohio by the Reflex Spark Plug Company.  It's called a "Center Primer."  The knurled cup on top has a needle valve that opens when unscrewed.  This allows a few drops of gas to be dripped into the plug.  The fuel goes right down through the center of the plug and theoretically a drop hangs on the tip.  Supposedly makes for easier cold weather starts (if you remember to screw down the needle valve before trying to start!). 

Terry

 

Reflex Priming (top) brass and Nickle version.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

This is more of a question than a display - I just picked up a few spark plugs from an auction over the weekend.  Now one of the joys of Covid and online auctions is, in my area at least, right now there is no in person viewing so you have to rely on the photographs provided and in this case different plugs, though similar style and still NOS, have been put into the boxes.  Now that being said I am not having a lot of luck finding information on what was originally in the boxes and I have never heard of the term Petticoat in relation to plugs.  A couple of other boxes with different part numbers have the term Conical, Those ones may have been A204 or something similar.   

 

Don  

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DSC_0362 (2).JPG

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Are they complete plugs or just insulators as indicated on the box?  If they are complete plugs, are they Champion or other brands?  Your post indicates that "...different plugs" have been put into the boxes?

In response to your question about "conical" and "Petticoat" style - here are few of photos that will help explain. 

 

The first photo shows what is known as a "conical" style tip.  Most early plugs used this "conical" style business end.  The problem with these types of plugs was they tended to foul and short out easily.  To help reduce the tendency to foul, or short out with soot deposits on the tip shorting them out, the "Petticoat" style was introduced. 

 

The second photo shows a photo of a J-D Petticoat type spark plug.  It's interesting to note that Champion acquired this company in 1916 so they could obtain the rights to mineral deposits of Siliminite, which produced a superior insulating material.   The "Petticoat" type of plug has a deep recess surrounding the center electrode.  That provides a greater surface area a spark would need to travel in order to short out.  Spark will travel over the shortest distance, and in the case of a "Petticoat" style plug, that distance will be between the center and ground electrode-just where the spark should be. 

 

The third photo shows an example of a plug that utilizes the Canfield patent.  That design was actually patented in 1898 by Frank Canfield. Of course it was known as the Canfield Patent and was used in a lot of plugs.  The Canfield Patent was acquired by Mosler who filed a lot of lawsuits for patent infringement during the time they existed.  Later, it was acquired by Champion, but eventually became public domain.

 

Spark plug insulators were sold as replacements for most early plugs.  Plugs were made in two pieces -a shell or plug body with the threaded portion that screws into the engine, and a gland or "packing" nut that screws into the shell to hold the insulator in place.  That enabled removal of just the porcelain (or mica) core so it could be cleaned, or replaced.  The photo of the J-D spark plug is a good example of one that is made so it can be disassembled.

 

More info than you wanted to know or expected I'm sure. 
Terry

 

Plug tip.jpg

Plug-Petticoat.jpg

Plug, Petticoat base.jpg

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Back in the teens when the plugs I photo were produced, they were not designated as hot or cold, and few had any numbering system like we have seen since the thirties. Plugs were sold in a few different thread sizes and in varying lengths depending on what car they were used in.  We've come a long way, but the basic spark plug really hasn't changed too much.  I think it's the only part of a car that's actually gotten cheaper over time.

Terry

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4 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

More info than you wanted to know or expected I'm sure. 
Terry

Terry,

 

That was the perfect amount of information - and you were correct about the insulators, that is what is in the boxes.  I will get some pictures of the actual contents tomorrow, like half the crew here I got a little side tracked by the snow today but the it's cleaned up now and the sun is supposed to shine tomorrow so all good.  As soon as I looked at your pictures the two terms made perfect sense and are an excellent description of their respective design.

 

Don  

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These are the actual items that were in the boxes.  I'm not sure at this point how many are NOS and how many are used.  The one marked made in Canada also is an 8 but none of the others are similarly marked and only the boxes are marked as Made in Canada.   Interesting to note as well that there were what appears, to me at least, two different styles of Petticoat insulators.  

 

Don  

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DSC_0366 (2).JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/16/2020 at 3:52 PM, Terry Bond said:

Thanks for posting Bob, that's a great plug and a neat story to go along with it.  Eyquem was indeed one of the premier spark plug manufacturers in France and their plugs were widely distributed throughout Europe.  Some were even imported into the US in the early 1900s. Here is a neat piece of Eyquem advertising -

Terry

Eyquen poster.jpg

I came across a little 'Bulbhorn' feature article written years ago by Peter Helck entitled "We keep the bogies in the safe!" He went on to explain such was the practice of one NYC auto parts retailer because French "sparking plugs" (called bogies then) were so highly sought after selling for as much as $5 or $10 a piece in the early days of motoring! 

 

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17 hours ago, md murray said:

I came across a little 'Bulbhorn' feature article written years ago by Peter Helck entitled "We keep the bogies in the safe!" He went on to explain such was the practice of one NYC auto parts retailer because French "sparking plugs" (called bogies then) were so highly sought after selling for as much as $5 or $10 a piece in the early days of motoring! 

 

Bougie is the correct spelling-and they are still referred to as that.  It translates literally to "candle."  Not sure they ever really sold for that much but in many cases a day's pay was what it would take to buy them.  Fascinating history, and if we ever get the AACA Annual Convention rescheduled I hope to actually present a seminar on the history of the spark plug. 

Terry

Gamages 1906 view 2.jpg

Gamages 1906 image 1.jpg

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21 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

I hope to actually present a seminar on the history of the spark plug. 

That would be great! I for one would love to see that. -And thank you for the spelling correction😄!

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