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 Well, folks, today my plans for the new garage starting to get real. Most of the materials were delivered late today. It doesn't seem to look like much, but it will be a 24X38 ft. and about 14 ft high, building, with heat, wall and floor insulation, 100 amp power, then gas heat when the rest is done. It gets cold here, and I want to keep me and my Buicks warm! The old garage, is still very good, and is staying. It holds 4 cars, and the new one will hold 3 more. I hoping that this will be the workshop garage, and to keep it to 3 cars, so that I have lots of space around them. As we all know, extra space seems to get filed up with one thing or another!

 I'll try to post updates as the work progresses.

 Keith

 

NewGarage1.jpg

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Please do, we like to see garage builds.  It's also nice to bounce ideas around as I'm sure even in the best laid plans there are things we all forget to take into account.  

I only had two small things on mine.  Time and Cost.  My wallets empty and I still can't see the light at the end of the tunnel. ;) 

 

I also hope there is more material than you showed.  Doesn't look like enough for the frame. 

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 That's what I thought too, and was inquiring with the builder, and guess what? Two more trucks showed up today with more stuff. Think that everything is here now.

 The excavation is planned to start April 1, hope its' not just a joke!

 Keith

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Lots of drainage and stone. (I have over $5,000 in stone in my garage project and drive to it and that was with me doing all the work spreading and grading it,  with an old timer charging me very little to deliver it)  You won't regret it. Try to make sure your garage floor is atleast 6 inches above the highest grade that will touch it.   A poly barrier under the floor as well to keep moisture from coming up through the floor. 

Good luck and show us how it progresses. 

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This is an exciting time.  You know what you’ll end up with but you still wonder if you’ve dotted the “i’s” and crossed the T’s.

 

Time and cost is always an issue but When my project was at this stage I wish that I had installed more water lines, air lines, communication lines, and even some long electrical runs, especially for outdoor connections.  

 

I’m interested in hearing more about floor insulation, I’ve never heard that before.

 

keep us posted!

Joel  

Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)
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There are a few different options on the floor insulation.  There are regular smooth rigid foam sheets,  just like you use in the walls. There is also a type i'm planning on using that looks almost like an egg carton that gives you a pattern to lay the pex style tubing in for infloor heat.

If I think of it,  I'll try to grab a photo of some of the pieces a friend gave me for mine.   It's a little more expensive but he swears by it as it makes it much easier to lay the tubing out and it stays much better when pouring. 

 

Also no matter how much you plan,  you'll still wish you had done something different. 

I thought I had everything planned,  then decided to change to cedar shakes on the end, though I already bought and prefinished all the board and batten siding.  I also marked sleeves for electric on the plans and of course the masons didn't put them all where they were marked.  

Oh your ride is about to begin,  hopefully it goes smoothly. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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I didn’t insulate my floor because it keeps the garage above 40 regardless of how cold it gets outside.  Even during single digit outside temps.  The ground is “warm” under it.  I have a couple of good electric heaters that can get it to 60 in a couple of hours when I want to work out there.  I’m in Kentucky, so the climate isn’t drastically different.  A little warmer.  It’s 24x40 with a tall ceiling and an open staircase to the loft upstairs.  No insulation between the floors, and r-13 in the walls and roof.

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32 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

I didn’t insulate my floor because it keeps the garage above 40 regardless of how cold it gets outside.  Even during single digit outside temps.  The ground is “warm” under it.

Do you have any problem with your floor sweating when you get those quick wet warm ups? 

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4 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Do you have any problem with your floor sweating when you get those quick wet warm ups? 

Just around the door openings if I open them.  It would do that before I insulated it because it would get down to freezing, but now that it stays above 40 (I actually typically keep one heater set on 50) it’s very minimal.  There seems to be a fine line somehere in the 30’s that makes a difference.

 

Im very frugal, so if it’s going to be below freezing for a few days I will turn the heater on 50 and it stays there (because the thermostat won’t go below 50).  As long as the outside temps are above freezing I leave the heat off unless I’m working out there.  I don’t want the heater running all the time unless I really need it.

 

I also keep a dehumidifier in there set on low and a sheet of 4x8 paneling under each vehicle in order to create a buffer between the car and the concrete, thus keeping any moisture to a minimum.  You can feel the dry air in your nose when you walk in.

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...

 Finally, after a couple of hold ups from the county, actual construction started the other day. First was the digging for the support posts, using a Bobcat to drill the soil down, then concrete was poured to anchor them. Then they started building the framework. This is going up in what I'd think is and unusual way. The walls and roof will be built, then they will pour the concrete for the floor. This way, the concrete runs to the edge of the walls, and better seals the building.

 It is coming together very quickly!

 For some reason, I can't upload any pictures. It says "you can only upload 9.77 mb" But I'm no where near that!

 Keith

 

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The 9.77 limit seems to be an on off again thing as sometimes I get it and sometimes  not. I’ll post a question in the forum software forum and see what’s the deal. Interesting build sequencing what you describe ...

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I tried uploading 4 photos that were about 1.5 mb each, which would be well under the limit, and then I even downsized them, went back and it would not let me upload one!

I will try again later today, I don't have them on this system.

Thanks, guys.

Keith

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1 hour ago, Buicknutty said:

I tried uploading 4 photos that were about 1.5 mb each, which would be well under the limit, and then I even downsized them, went back and it would not let me upload one!

I will try again later today, I don't have them on this system.

Thanks, guys.

Keith

The forum refuses photos of any size or amount from my desktop computer, but no problem from my smart phone.  Now the prose is limited using a smart phone...

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Thanks for the update Keith.  I’ve been curious as to how things are progressing.  

 

I’ll try to remember to call some time next week perhaps (this coming week is quite busy) on a couple topics.

 

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Looks like it's going to get done fast.  It took them 2 weeks to get to that phase on mine,  of course with studding at 16 on center and a 72 foot wall,  it takes a while to cut and nail it all together. 

Had a flat tire on my 20,000 lb lift.  Not good.  It unseated the tire from the rim on the sidewall.  14 ply tires don't exactly pop back on the rim easily.  I'm waiting for a friend to drop off his blast tank to give it a blast of air to pop it on.  

I'll trade my 80 foot boom lift for your scissor lift.  it's a monster and takes up too much room in the garage. 

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 Wish the scissor lift was mine, but its' the contractors. Certainly does seem to work well for them though. Part of it was prefabbed at the factory, which is less than 10 mins away from here. So it goes together fairly quickly. Never took any shots today, but most of the walls are up, and they're working on the doors.

Keith

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1 hour ago, JohnD1956 said:

Is that going to stand up to the snow load in that area?

The plans were approved by an engineer, and it meets, or exceeds the local building codes.

So I'm thinking that all will be well!

Keith

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Interesting build Keith. It would be the metal version of a pole barn.

Is it going to be insulated too?

With a metal roof I might be concerned about sweating if not heated.

Dad built a pole barn and the builder recommended putting on a plywood roof with shingles just to avoid that issue as he didn't plan on insulating and heating it. He also put a bathroom fan / vent in to circulate the air some and he never had moisture issues.

 

Looking good so far Keith!

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 We can get quite a bit of snow, for this area, 2-3 feet.

 

 Doug, this is what is often called a pole barn, and it is insulated, r18 in the walls and roof, and I think something like r30 for the wall nearest the other garage, as it has to be a firewall.

 Also, the floor is have about r18 in it as well, then 6+ in of concrete.

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Curious what the snow load in the plans was figured on?  I think I specked mine for the next higher zone (overkill,  but I don't want to worry about it) It's either 85 or 90 lbs.  per square foot. 

 The funny thing with plans is As long as they are stamped the next guys all sign off,  because it falls on the guy with the stamp,  who may not even be in business when the building falls down.  I know steel supports differently than wood and the factors are figured in as a system where many of us figure stuff on the individual components.   My trussess are 2 foot on center 6 on 12 pitch with 2 x 6 top and bottom plates.   Of course I have a 60 foot clear span with 2 foot overhang. 

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As I said it's probably something to do with the perlin size as well that connects the trusses.  I imagine a steel truss might be stronger than a wood one,  as the wood ones of larger sizes have to be pieced along the top and bottom bands where the steel ones can be one piece.  I got a little soffit up on mine between yesterday and today but with the wife under the weather,  I have had alot of her duties shifted to me as well as caring for the kids, school etc.  Got on my lift today went up,  put one band board on the siding to finish it off (of course it had a bow to it). Got the first fastener in so the 16 foot board was hanging by that,  then out of nowhere the sky's opened up and got me drenched.   I worked through it to get it up.  Of course nothing like working under Niagara falls wit hteh eves running,  I called it quit and put the lift inside,  then it stopped and never rained again the rest of the evening. 

Figures.  There is a higher power working against me I think. 

 

Nice to see the quick progress on yours. 

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 Here's a couple of shots from yesterday. Since I took them another load of gravel was put in, and smoothed out more. Today being the holiday, no work was done, but the conrete is due to be poured on Monday.

Keith

 

GarageThurs1.jpg

GarageThurs2.jpg

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Is your gravel out front going to be the same grade as your floor?  I would be worried about water running in under the doors during one of those heavy rains or worse yet,  heavy snows that slide off,  blocking your door then the rain comes down and runs down the snow then freezes the door shut.  I rented a storage unit like that once.  Hopefully your floor will be about 6 inches higher than your outside highest grade that is next to the building.   I know we had 6 inches of ice under the snow this year so any water that permiated the snow flowed on top of that. 

 

Nice choice on having some windows.  So many guys build stuff with no natural lighting which makes it a pit if you ever have to go out there and can't turn the lights on for some reason. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

 I've been at a bit tardy in posting updates. They poured the floor about a week ago, and they seemed to do a good job. The floor was burnished during the drying phase to give it a nice smooth, flat finish.

 Here's a few of the pouring etc.

 Keith

 

GarageA1.jpg

GarageA2.jpg

GarageA3.jpg

GarageA4.jpg

GarageA5.jpg

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Ah a cement floor.  I can only dream.  Maybe some day.  Sure is nice to see a Garage get built in a few Months and 2 pages.  I've been on mine for 3 years including site prep and I'm still on the shell.  I think we are at page 7 or 8 on the thread as well.  bigger is always better until you have to write the checks for it.

looks good.  You'll be working on your Buicks in there before I even get my shell done. :( 

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That's some float they have there!  It looks like it has a small gas engine on it.  Does it vibrate?

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 Yes, those gadgets were gas powered. Then they used a big flat one, rather like a fan to smooth it out when it hard enough to walk on. They did a great job on it.

 Of course I have had virtually all of the work contracted out, through one main contractor. So its' more expensive, but it does get done quickly. Though sometimes contractors don't work quick, but this place got it done quickly.

 Got a few more pics to post later on.

 Thanks, guys.

 Keith

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 Here's how it is at this moment. There is a bit of regrading to do in the front, and inside you can seee that one wall is finished with steel panels, and the rest will be the same. You can also see. I hope, how nice the floor is.

I will epoxy coat the surface after the curing is finished, then the electrical gets done. But for now it is done, but I don't want to park any leaky Buicks (or anything else) inside till the floor is coated.

 Keith

 

GarageInt.jpg

Garage Int2.jpg

GarageOut.jpg

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