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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Roger,

The intake and exhaust manifolds are a work of art.  They represent a LOT of time, but you got them right.  Looking back at the exhaust manifold for the 1:1 engine, yours, when painted, will be hard to tell from the real manifolds.  A testament to your skill(s).  We are always looking for the next installment and to see what you are up to in the build.  Just amazing.

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I was going to return to the fabulous series when you were building the clutch and brake pedals. Ha! I got back a little further than that while seeking the part I was looking for. Hit the part about the oil pan. It was so good that I went all the way to the time when the frame was assembled and you said you were going to start the engine because it would not be very hard. Yeah, right. 😃

But , it was just as good to read it all again as it was that first time. 

Edited by Pat Hollingsworth (see edit history)
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On 9/16/2021 at 12:20 PM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks Randy! Indeed, there are more tiny details I could add, but sometimes enough is enough! For the moment, there is no progress, I'm not at home...

 

I keep noticing more details every time I look at that engine. That's what's so great about you posting so many pictures as you go through the building process. I don't know if I would notice all the details if I only saw the finished model.

 

Hopefully you will see your time off from the model as a needed break to let your eyes and hands recuperate. Safe travels!

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Gentlemen (and ladies),

 

I will dig up the pictures of the RR P2 Chassis at the Nethercutt Museum. My camera skills were not as good as they  are today. (lighting was off), but they  represent the chassis pretty clearly.  I just hope that when I find the disc that the pictures are not compromised.

 

I talked to Skip Marchetti (the director a few years ago) and he said that they had not mated a body  to the chassis (yet or maybe never?).  Anyway, it was very  interesting to see how RR delivered the chassis to the customer/builder.  There is a bulkhead fitted to the chassis and it has the necessary components for the coach builder.  AND  to move the chassis off of the truck/ship/railroad car, there was a box or crate that the delivery  person sat on.  In it were additional parts.  Sure wasn't comfortable but the chassis wasn't going very far so the driver could endure that crate for a short distance.

 

I forgot to ask Skip about the condition that the chassis was in when Mr. Nethercutt took possession of it.  I am sure that it was not in that great of shape.  J.B. Nethercutt has a premium restoration shop below the Sylmar museum (across the street from the J.B. Nethercutt museum).  For those who do not know, J.B. was the nephew of...............Meryl Nethercutt Norman of Meryl Norman Cosmetics company.

 

He was going to college studying chemical engineering (back in the late 20's or early 30's and was staying with her at her home.   Meryl was making up  facial products in her kitchen (cold cream for one) for her friends and that was growing into a business.  J. D. studied what she was doing and saw ways to improve her product(s).  And the cosmetics company became a booming business.  He was a "poor" college student until the company took off.  He met his wife, who was a very beautiful lady and looked that way  into her later years.  Stunning.  They use to drive around Los Angeles in his old touring sedan.  The car had no floorboards so when he and his fiancee would drive to the different dealerships, she had to place her feet up on the firewall.  And we won't even discuss riding in that flivver in inclement weather!

 

J.D. studied all the elite marks of that day and when they would go to the showrooms of the differnt dealerships, he could rattle off the statistics regarding any of the models that they were selling.  The salesmen would be in awe at his knowledge and expertise.  He would collect the brochures and swore some day to own one of the fine cars.

 

If you live in the Los Angeles area, or are planning a trip out here, do make it a point to visit the Nethercutt and the Sylmar museum.  The Sylmar is modeled after the fine delarships (Packard, Pierce Arrow, Cadillac, Duesenberg, etc., etc.) of the thirties with marbel floors, huge marble columns, potted ferns in the lobby, fine couches and chairs, etc., etc.  The  cars are staged just as if they were in the dealership so many years ago.  AND that is not all.  the Nethercutts were avid collectors of fine watches and time pieces, music boxes,orachestrons (not spelled right) and large band machines that use to be used for entertainment (before piped in music) in parks and music halls.  All restored and functional. On the top floor, he has the largest Wurlitzer organ in existance.  The huge pipes (two and three stories tall for some of the pipes) produce the rich sound that is AMAZING to hear.  They give concerts there with different organists coming in to perform.  Truely amazing collection of very fine automobiles and such.  He felt that these items were works of art and his dream was to house them in a museum to be shared with the the public.......in perpetuity............FOR FREE.  All you have to do is call and make a reservation to visit.

 

In the Nethercutt museum, he even has a restored steam engine, a Canadian National and behind it is the most exquisit private railroad car that was owned by the daughter of a Titan of industry, leaving her and her sister a vast fortune.  In those days, the rich traveled in private cars.  Hers was purchased by the museum and was meticulously restored to the condition that it was when she traveld in it.  Truely a masterpiece in their collection and worth seeing.

 

J.B. and Dorothy (long since gone) have a son, Jack, who runs the businesses.  To date, the Nethercutts have more "best of shows" at Pebble Beach than any other individual or competing museum. J.B. was always in contention with Bill Harrah for first at Pebble!  One year Harrah would win, then the next Nethercutt would win.  Very seldom does the museum enter a vehicle in competetion without garnering top honors.  Their research/restoration shop employees fine artisans in their own right.  Stunning to see these craftsmen turn out such quality restorations.

 

So, if you ever get to Los Angeles, do not miss this fine collection.  It is huge and will take at least a day to see.  Every car runs and are driven on occasion.  J.B. or Jack Nethercutt take a string of cars out to a local park for the company picnic and employees and family are all treated to rides.  A fine perk working for the Nethercutts.

 

The Merle Norman Cosmetics company is still in business.  It is connected to the Sylmar museum.  All of their employees working at the museum, in the restoration shop and the cosmetics company come to the company cafeteria and have lunch.  They employ a fine chef. The food is supurb and all this is for free when you work for the Nethercutts.  We had lunch there with our tour. Supurbe.

 

I will get the pics uploaded, hopefully, by this weekend.

 

Randy 

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5 hours ago, Randiego said:

Gentlemen (and ladies),

 

I will dig up the pictures of the RR P2 Chassis at the Nethercutt Museum. My camera skills were not as good as they  are today. (lighting was off), but they  represent the chassis pretty clearly.  I just hope that when I find the disc that the pictures are not compromised.

 

I talked to Skip Marchetti (the director a few years ago) and he said that they had not mated a body  to the chassis (yet or maybe never?).  Anyway, it was very  interesting to see how RR delivered the chassis to the customer/builder.  There is a bulkhead fitted to the chassis and it has the necessary components for the coach builder.  AND  to move the chassis off of the truck/ship/railroad car, there was a box or crate that the delivery  person sat on.  In it were additional parts.  Sure wasn't comfortable but the chassis wasn't going very far so the driver could endure that crate for a short distance.

 

I forgot to ask Skip about the condition that the chassis was in when Mr. Nethercutt took possession of it.  I am sure that it was not in that great of shape.  J.B. Nethercutt has a premium restoration shop below the Sylmar museum (across the street from the J.B. Nethercutt museum).  For those who do not know, J.B. was the nephew of...............Meryl Nethercutt Norman of Meryl Norman Cosmetics company.

 

He was going to college studying chemical engineering (back in the late 20's or early 30's and was staying with her at her home.   Meryl was making up  facial products in her kitchen (cold cream for one) for her friends and that was growing into a business.  J. D. studied what she was doing and saw ways to improve her product(s).  And the cosmetics company became a booming business.  He was a "poor" college student until the company took off.  He met his wife, who was a very beautiful lady and looked that way  into her later years.  Stunning.  They use to drive around Los Angeles in his old touring sedan.  The car had no floorboards so when he and his fiancee would drive to the different dealerships, she had to place her feet up on the firewall.  And we won't even discuss riding in that flivver in inclement weather!

 

J.D. studied all the elite marks of that day and when they would go to the showrooms of the differnt dealerships, he could rattle off the statistics regarding any of the models that they were selling.  The salesmen would be in awe at his knowledge and expertise.  He would collect the brochures and swore some day to own one of the fine cars.

 

If you live in the Los Angeles area, or are planning a trip out here, do make it a point to visit the Nethercutt and the Sylmar museum.  The Sylmar is modeled after the fine delarships (Packard, Pierce Arrow, Cadillac, Duesenberg, etc., etc.) of the thirties with marbel floors, huge marble columns, potted ferns in the lobby, fine couches and chairs, etc., etc.  The  cars are staged just as if they were in the dealership so many years ago.  AND that is not all.  the Nethercutts were avid collectors of fine watches and time pieces, music boxes,orachestrons (not spelled right) and large band machines that use to be used for entertainment (before piped in music) in parks and music halls.  All restored and functional. On the top floor, he has the largest Wurlitzer organ in existance.  The huge pipes (two and three stories tall for some of the pipes) produce the rich sound that is AMAZING to hear.  They give concerts there with different organists coming in to perform.  Truely amazing collection of very fine automobiles and such.  He felt that these items were works of art and his dream was to house them in a museum to be shared with the the public.......in perpetuity............FOR FREE.  All you have to do is call and make a reservation to visit.

 

In the Nethercutt museum, he even has a restored steam engine, a Canadian National and behind it is the most exquisit private railroad car that was owned by the daughter of a Titan of industry, leaving her and her sister a vast fortune.  In those days, the rich traveled in private cars.  Hers was purchased by the museum and was meticulously restored to the condition that it was when she traveld in it.  Truely a masterpiece in their collection and worth seeing.

 

J.B. and Dorothy (long since gone) have a son, Jack, who runs the businesses.  To date, the Nethercutts have more "best of shows" at Pebble Beach than any other individual or competing museum. J.B. was always in contention with Bill Harrah for first at Pebble!  One year Harrah would win, then the next Nethercutt would win.  Very seldom does the museum enter a vehicle in competetion without garnering top honors.  Their research/restoration shop employees fine artisans in their own right.  Stunning to see these craftsmen turn out such quality restorations.

 

So, if you ever get to Los Angeles, do not miss this fine collection.  It is huge and will take at least a day to see.  Every car runs and are driven on occasion.  J.B. or Jack Nethercutt take a string of cars out to a local park for the company picnic and employees and family are all treated to rides.  A fine perk working for the Nethercutts.

 

The Merle Norman Cosmetics company is still in business.  It is connected to the Sylmar museum.  All of their employees working at the museum, in the restoration shop and the cosmetics company come to the company cafeteria and have lunch.  They employ a fine chef. The food is supurb and all this is for free when you work for the Nethercutts.  We had lunch there with our tour. Supurbe.

 

I will get the pics uploaded, hopefully, by this weekend.

 

Randy 

Randy did you mean to post this in another thread ?

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Gentlemen,

 

You are right.  It sounds like I was reping for the Nethercutt.  Many are not from here and we have several museums here in So Cal. (Mullin, Peterson just to name a couple) that have exemplary collections to see.  Since Roger did the Mark II and now is working on the Cadillac chassis, both of these examples are at the Nethercutt.  As a matter of fact, the Nethercutt has several of the Cadillac V 16s in different years and body styles. 

 

So enough about museums.  I have located the CD of the RR P2 Chassis but a lot of the pictures are compromised.  If you have photos stored on CDs, a warning to you all.......Get them copied to your hard dirve.  80% of my pics are kaput.  The ones that I do have, I will share but they are not the good ones showing the detail of the shift linkage, brake linkage, throttle and choke linkages, etc., etc. 

 

The museum is open, albiet 3 days a week now and the Sylmar is closed for the next month or so while they are renovating some of the facility.  I will be venturing up there with my new Canon Digital and re shoot this amazing chassis, along with the other marks in the museum.  I called them and they do not have individual cars on their website, just general pictures. Again, appologies to you readers for segueing away from what we tune in for.  The latest from Roger.  I just thought that while he is away, you might like the blurb about the Nethercutt.   I will get the few pics of this magnificient chassis posted this weekend. 

 

Oh, and incidentally, they are not going to put a body  on it.  It will stay as a chassis only.  But mind you, it really is phenominal to see how the engineers devised the systems that operate the automobile.  This was 90 years ago.   

 

Randy 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Roger, I'm liking the 'new' view of that side of the engine. So, go ahead and take a little time on the carbs. I can spend it seeing a few details I'd missed in earlier pictures. Not that I want to wait too long for more good stuff from your bench. Thanks, man, this is sweet.

 

On the subject of the carburetors; Are the twelve cylinder ones the same as the ones for the sixteen cylinder engine?

Edited by Pat Hollingsworth (see edit history)
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Thank you, Roger for answering my question- I know little enough about these engines that I wanted to know. Add in the photo of the pair of them that are even marked as for the bigger engine, I have to admire the designers for their thoroughness. And, the finish on the carburetors is as handsomely done as the rest of those nice looking engines, too. Wow! 

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Roger,

I was going to post pictures of the RR P2 chassis that is at the Nethercutt Museum here in Los Angeles.  Upon retrieving my disc with the pictures on it, it is totally compromised and they are ruined.  I will be traveling to Sylmar (North Los Angeles) with my new camera in tow to re shoot this magnificent chassis.  It is in the same era as the Cadillac with similar engineering for the hardware and running gear.   I will email them to you as posting all of them on this site may not be allowed due to capacity.  Fellow followers who have read my previous post of the chassis commented that this is not the site for sharing about the RR chassis.  So..... I will only post one or two pics of that chassis.  I can also send a link to my Google Drive and you can view them there.  I will be traveling to Sylmar in November as soon as there is a break in my work.  Right now I am very busy but I think that you (and others) will enjoy seeing this chassis in it's naked splendor.  They have done a beautiful job restoring it.  It is just as it has left the facility.  

In the day, I am wondering if Cadillac shipped their chassis to the coach maker in the same manner?  The curator of the museum said that the extra parts were in a box strapped to the chassis making a "seat" for the worker to drive the chassis out of the facility to the shipping area.  You may know that answer but if not, I am sure that someone will be able to answer that question.  

The Cadillac V16s that have been here at our Concourse de Elegance in La Jolla have been absolutely stunning.  We all await what you are going to do with this chassis.  It is almost a shame to "hide" it with a body as all your intricate  and detailed work is just spectacular.  Again, with paint and in a diorama, one could not tell if your works of art are not the "real thing" , a 1:1 representation.  We all await your next installment.

Randy

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Randy, thanks for your comments. I assume for the similar category, frames are almost the same...

The next parts I did are the air intakes which are attached to the throttle body with two screws. That is way not finished, the float chambers must be attached to the air intakes. 
As it can happens, I did a major error with the first set of air intakes. The diameter was too large, more than 1/2 mm. I wondered why I has so few space for the screws at the flange...Obviously, I took the dimension from another similar part. Silver soldered parts can be separated to save some elements, but in this case, I preferred to redo all elements because all was too much concentered.

344 Air intake.JPG

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