avgwarhawk

1960 Buick Electra

100 posts in this topic

4 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

I feel like Johnny Cash. One piece at a time.  

 

Out with the old and in with the new..

 

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Looks like the bushings need a little more compression.  On swaybar links you usually tighten until the the nut bottoms out. :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, old-tank said:

Looks like the bushings need a little more compression.  On swaybar links you usually tighten until the the nut bottoms out. :)

 

 

 

 

Done!

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And out with the old and in with the new.   I have two new Cokers on the way.  Clock appears to want to work so need to look into that a bit more.   Fuel pump replacement next and related rubber hose from pump to steel line running inside the frame.  Check on the heater core or control valve possible coolant leak at one or both.  Rebuild carb.  That will be all!

 

WP_20170412_006_zpsz9lyzyge.jpg

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Clocks are easy to fix.  There are a set of points in it that get corroded.  Blow the dust out, oil lightly and clean the points.  Chances are it will work again.

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Don't use a point file, use a burnishing tool like emery cloth if cleaning the points up.

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3 hours ago, Bill Stoneberg said:

Clocks are easy to fix.  There are a set of points in it that get corroded.  Blow the dust out, oil lightly and clean the points.  Chances are it will work again.

 

Bill, I took a quick look a week or so ago.  First place of course was looking at the fuse.  Trusty test light found power on one side and not the other.  But, the fuse inside looked ok.  No matter.  Went to replace it. As I worked on removing the fuse power was found through the fuse and clock was working.   Of course humans being humans we adjust our clocks to the correct time.  It was at this juncture the clock stopped again.  I did not recheck the fuse at that time.  I had a laundry list of items to tend to.   I will tackle the fuse once again.  If it test good the clock will come out for a clean and oiling.

 

Thanks for the tip!     

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1 hour ago, Beemon said:

Don't use a point file, use a burnishing tool like emery cloth if cleaning the points up.

 

Thanks for the tip! 

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New set of Coker 2 1/2 WW bias ply on the rear installed this weekend.  There is no doubt the US Royals have been on the Buick for quite some time.      Repacked the front wheel bearings. I like a bit more bearing grease then what was there.    Inspected all brake components.  All return springs, cylinders, hard lines, shoes and master have less than 600 miles on them.  Good to go.   

 

Wrap this up with a new fuel pump and carb rebuild.  Look into the heater core/valve at the end of summer.

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Did you check your brake lines too ?  I ask as I found a bubble in mine.

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On ‎4‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 1:59 PM, avgwarhawk said:

  Look into the heater core/valve at the end of summer.

 

Actually, that leak could cost you significant temperature issues during the summer.  Are you going to by-pass the heater altogether for now?

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15 hours ago, Bill Stoneberg said:

Did you check your brake lines too ?  I ask as I found a bubble in mine.

 

 

The entire brake system has been replaced.  All rubber hoses, metal lines, master cylinder, wheel cylinders, return springs and shoes.  I have pulled and inspected all drums.  No leaking in the rear wheel seals.  New seals on the drums up front.   She stop very well for 2 tons of vehicle.   

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12 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

Actually, that leak could cost you significant temperature issues during the summer.  Are you going to by-pass the heater altogether for now?

 

The cooling systems does keep pressure when running at operating temperature.  My diagnosis as a result of pressure in the system while hot is the control valve is working and a leak at the core when valve is open.  What is odd is when the heat is first switched I get the faint smell of antifreeze.  It dissipates very quickly and no issue after that.   I drove the Buick about 60 miles  in 80+ degree weather this past weekend.  No over hearting.  At any rate, I will leave it as it stands for now and pull down the heating box at the end of the summer.

 

  

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New fuel pump on.  The rubber fuel hose from pump to the hard line was on the way out.  One stiff tug and it came apart.  The hard fuel line was in great shape.  The hose clamp at the hard line connection at the frame is a unique design.  It has a hook type design that hooks to the clamp to the frame so if the rubber line was pulled for whatever reason the hook on the clamp would keep the rubber line from pulling off the hard line.

I guess it would be prudent to check the rubber hose in the tank area.             

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Spending time with the 60.   Clock is running like a well oiled watch.  Ummmmm......it's running.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

On 2017-04-21 at 2:57 AM, avgwarhawk said:

Spending time with the 60.   Clock is running like a well oiled watch.  Ummmmm......it's running.

 

 

Hmm. Mine has stopped at 5 to 4, need to take a look at that..... some day. Awsome looking clock that deserves to work like... a clock

 

 

Edited by LeCat (see edit history)

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It was time to pull the carburetor for a rebuild.  Hesitation and flat spots.    I found the channel under the carburetor loaded with carbon flaky powdery nastiness.  It was good and clogged.  Removed that bit of nasty crap.  The entire carburetor was well covered by years of gook and grime.  Other than the clogged passages under the carb the La Brea Tar Pits sludge covering the carb as well as inside the carb was cleaned out.   After inspecting when the cleaning as done I made the decision to reinstall and see what she runs like.  The engine idles fine.  Performance as fine.  Just that annoying hesitation and flat spot that would rear it's ugly head when it felt like it.   Further, the accelerator pump squirted gas as design.  

 

So, call me crazy or call me a tow truck I reinstalled.  Much to my surprise the carburetor performed flawlessly.  So screw it.  I drove on....

 

 

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Interesting tips re clock , will see if works on my 53

cheers

pilgrim

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Those rochesters are infamous for the bog.  I have given up on several of them and just dealt with it.

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3 hours ago, Smartin said:

Those rochesters are infamous for the bog.  I have given up on several of them and just dealt with it.

She was bogging quite a bit. Feather the pedal when accelerating from a stoplight. Bog when accelerating at speed. After clean up the bog is just about nonexistent. Much improved and more positive/responsive when pressing the gas pedal. When the secondary open she really moves. I'm pleased with the results. 

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On 2017-4-12 at 6:17 PM, avgwarhawk said:

I feel like Johnny Cash. One piece at a time.  

 

Out with the old and in with the new..

 

WP_20170412_002_zpsofh8t7ez.jpg

 

WP_20170412_004_zps2hqwzdl9.jpg

 

Just a question / comment.

When I had my car up on the hoist and my mechanic looked at these, he said that they were installed upside down.

It has a long time ago when they were replaced and can't remember if I did them or the mechanic at that time did them. His rational was that if you went over something a bit high those threads would catch and either bend them or break off....

Have you noticed how they are on any other of your cars?

My other cars are not handy close by to look and besides, it's not the getting down to look that comes into play, it's the getting back up. :blink:

 

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, dei said:

 

Just a question / comment.

When I had my car up on the hoist and my mechanic looked at these, he said that they were installed upside down.

It has a long time ago when they were replaced and can't remember if I did them or the mechanic at that time did them. His rational was that if you went over something a bit high those threads would catch and either bend them or break off....

Have you noticed how they are on any other of your cars?

My other cars are not handy close by to look and besides, it's not the getting down to look that comes into play, it's the getting back up. :blink:

 

 

My 60 is unmolested. The original link kits that I removed where installed just as you see the new link kits in the pictures. Also, at the top of the link kit, if the threaded portion was in that position when installed it could possibly rub the frame. 

 

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, dei said:

it's not the getting down to look that comes into play, it's the getting back up. :blink:

Time to get back down anyway.  The rubber grommets are not compressed enough.  Those links are to be installed until the nut bottoms on the rod threads  On some replacements new threads may need to be cut.

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22 minutes ago, old-tank said:

  On some replacements new threads may need to be cut.

 

And there is this.  

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On 4/8/2017 at 11:08 PM, avgwarhawk said:

 

The ride height remained the same.  She sits level.  The rear with no one in the back seat would bottom out/hit the rubber bumpers with the old springs. Some sagging.   I have always done well with the progressive coils.  The ride is the same as the old coils.  A bit less body roll. 

 

The front coils are fine and will remain. Shocks will be replaced. 

What's the theory behind progressive springs?  I'm guessing that the first several hundred pounds is carried by the light weight end of the spring and as the weight increases, the lightweight end is nearly fully compressed and the heavy weight end of the spring takes over.  In other words, the soft ride first progressing to more firmness as the weigh increases.  Am I close?

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21 hours ago, kgreen said:

What's the theory behind progressive springs?  I'm guessing that the first several hundred pounds is carried by the light weight end of the spring and as the weight increases, the lightweight end is nearly fully compressed and the heavy weight end of the spring takes over.  In other words, the soft ride first progressing to more firmness as the weigh increases.  Am I close?

 

Yes!  

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