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michel88

Warming up your engine

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I have started them and immediately started driving them even in below freezing weather,

Wayne, That's how I do. What's the point of warming up an engine if the trans, diff and wheel bearings are cold? I see it all the time even at -40. People warm up the car in the drive way then hop in and blast off with no thought to all the other driveline components still encased in glue like gear oil.

Forty odd years ago when I worked in the arctic on very cold nights I would drain the engine oil and bring it into the house and warm it up on a wood stove in the morning just before putting it back in the crankcase before I attempted to start the Chrysler 6 cylinder flathead engine in the old Bombardier. We had no electricity for a block heater or to operate a battery charger either. If the engine failed to start I have seen a gas soaked rag placed over the carb intake and set on fire as the engine was turned over. Once saw a Bombardier catch fire that way though so never tried it myself. Aircraft had a tent placed over the engine cowl and the oil was heated with a blow torch type devise placed inside the tent. Oil was also diluted with gasoline to thin it before the engine was started.

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Dave, I wouldn't envy anyone having to refill the engine with oil when the outside temperature is below freezing. I used to have to "torch" truck air-lines in the days before truck air dyers. Laying on the ground, in the snow, makes for uncomfortable working conditions, but boy, it sure makes the service truck heater feel good afterwards. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Speaking of that, a friend of mine has had to build a "shop" around a broken down truck on the side of the road in the winter time. He always carried some old plywood with him. Prop the plywood on two sides of the truck and in front of it. Place a shop(surface) heater at the back running off the service truck generator, and presto you have a heated "shop". He's actually replaced a transmission this way, right beside the highway. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

Wayne

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This debate has gone on for years and has been addressed by my pals at Road & Track for a long time. The engineering editors' consenses is that once oil pressure is up the car is suitable to drive in a restrained manner. With higher speeds rleative to temperature increases. I don't start my Northstar and punch it hard as soon as all the dash light go out either.

My Packard is a very cold natured beast and is sluggish until the temp guage is up about half way even with the choke working well on a newly-rebuilt carb. Every older vehicle I've owned has been like this to some degree. Older cars seem to like/require a bit of warm up. They certainly run better warmer.

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Twitch, your post reminds me of the '63 Chevy Impala my dad bought new. It was the only car he ever owned that had a green light in the instrument panel that went out when the water temperature got near full operating temperature. Did any other vehicles have such indicators?

Wayne

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The idea of bulding a "shop" around the car for roadside repair in winter time is good. I wish I had made that many years ago when my differential broke far from home, see attachment.

Jan

post-32235-143137915831_thumb.jpg

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Hi Wayne,

My 1961 Olds also has a green light for when the engine is cold. It goes off after it warms up. It has the red light for when it overheats. It must be that GM had that for a while although I do not know how long.

I like the idea of a light but also would like to have a gauge also. I think some of the new cars have that now. My 1991 Plymouth Voyager offers both a gauge and idiot light so other vehicles must offer it.

Bill Pritchett

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My former '63 Buick Wildcat had the green/red temp lights too...

I think Chevy stopped using the green "Cold" light atfer the '66 model year... my Grandad's '67 Impala did not have the green light; my '66 Impalas still did...

Must have been a GM-thing... I don't remember other makes having an idiot light for "cold"; our 1962-'65 Falcons and Galaxies had idiot lights for the Generator and Oil Pressure, but still had a Temp gauge...

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The '66 Ford full-size had a blue "cold" light, and I'm pretty sure my brother's '69 LTD did as well. I'm sure other FoMoCo's that era at least did as well.

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My 68 Olds 98 ragtop had one of those cold lights. When I lived in VA, the light would usually go out when I pulled into the parking lot at work. (a combination of only living 6-7 miles from the office, and that the 455 took a long time to get up to normal temperature)IIRC my mom's 66 Bel Air had one too.

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The El Do doesn't have a warm up light but I just meant once the oil pressure, coolant temp, air bag, seat belt and all the other junk goes off after starting it means oil pressure is up and I can drive gently. I don't push it harder until the temp gauge is up to half...like the Packard. Hmm?

When I was in a daily commute situation I'd take a further away on-ramp to the freeway so the engine would get some temp before I'd feel OK about accelerating onto the road...if it wasn't bumper to bumper.

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