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About Twitch

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  • Birthday 02/11/1948
  1. It just seems like somebody way up there has a bug in their butt about hydrogen. It's great. They proved the concept more or less and built some viable prototypes. But stop the hoopla and concentrate on producing the fuel at a viable cost otherwise it's just more hot air when there are several other working solutions now available. It just seems they are ignoring all the rest and fixated on the one that actually doesn't work yet in an economic sense. I don't get it unless there is a huge number of politicians and others that figure some way to make $$ on hydrogen somehow. Anything that uses power/energy to produce an end product, fuel or otherwise, has to do so at an economically viable rate. This means that anything which plugs into the power grid increases the need for power at that stage. Anything electric still requires extra power plant energy. Most plants are coal, natural gas, a few garbage-to-methane and a handful of nukers. So to produce some clean energy we have to increase dirty energy output or use energy that could be better used heating homes and buildings. And in ANY new tech do we fully know how much energy will be required to manufacture and transport the components for whatever non-gasoline cars that come along. In other words if we squander 3 times the amount of fabrication energy to build the hi-tech Wazoo Flyer over the Hyundai Zippy w/gasloine engine, what the hell is the point? It becomes a viscious circle quickly.
  2. On a not completely unrelated subject, I have had minor oil drips mysteriously stop, though not begin again.
  3. Well if we're going to have pump attendants again I may have something to d in my retirement years! Try the NO FUEL air-powered car. The French guy in the U-Tube thing was on TV talking about a perpetual motion concept where the car runs an on board compressor to replenish much of the power used to run the car and partially fill the tank! http://www.futurecars.com/ http://www.theaircar.com/acf/air-cars/air-cars.html http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=QmqpGZv0YT4
  4. Last we heard around here was that it was taking $1.10 worth of energy to make $1.00's worth of hydrogen. So we got one of the Japaneze companies building a bunch of hydrogen cars for some reason. Probably more "public relations." Or perhaps they'll work out some cleaver government subsity program....as soon as they actually build some useable fueling stations. But unless something has changed via a breakthrough, is the ratio still upside down on cost vs. production or what?
  5. As mentioned it isn't a high value collector-sought vehicle but there is a market for people who want well-kept lightly used luxury cars. It would be nice to word and ad directed to someone that doesn't just want a 2 car as a beater. An astute kid would appreciate it though more would go for performance cars- It's a big safe car as a kid's 1st car- I wouldda bought this for my oldest daughter's 1st car. Somebody will appreciate this car for what it is but it is hard to find that person.
  6. Go to any dealer that is an Interstate Battery dealer. They may not have it in stock but they'll get it in 2-5 days. They are available- don't change your battery box. I got a new one for my 50 a month ago.
  7. Anybody that is in the auto salvage business is a gambler. He's gambling that the investment he just made in some trashed car will pay off IF he sells enough parts off of the 'amazing hulk' he just "rescued." For him it's a business of profit and loss. Why should he share your impetus for saving old cars becasue you didn't know that someday there's be so many junked cars allegedly worth saving. You woulda bought more of them had you foreseen, right? So this guy may or may not have recovered his investment in a wreck. Besides his actual investment is his overhead, tax insurance and all that. And of course the value of the real estate that he has deferred to negative use as per community standards or simply his original land purchase is pretty well frozen. Unless he sells out to someone willing to continue to deal in dimes as profits while he segregates several acres of valueable land or sells out all his stock (unlikely) he has no alternative other than shred it all. After all, the salvage yard guy spent 30 years maintaining the yard which was there 30 years before. What more can be expected of him? Some of the same wrecks are still there when he bought it. He guesses if anybody was going to want them they'd have bought them by now. He isn't subsidized by old car clubs to be a criptkeeper until the hulks virtually disappear. He's not aware that the next big hobby trend for 82 Granadas is just around the corner. So this auto salvager/gambler has reached the end of his road. He made some good bets and some bad ones that still lie about mocking him. It is ashamed that his accountant who is handling the bid on his property has calculated that he could have done absolutely nothing with the property for 30 years and it would be worth the same. The salvager/gamber could have worked at a good paying job with full benefits and retirement while the junkyard land just sat and appreciated parlaying his end of work life payoff into a substantial sum. Instead he worked physically hard out in the weather 6-7 days a week with no bebefits and only a rare vacation. Now he wonders if he made the right gamble. He'll be fishing for gar in the Muskogee cause that's the only place his retirement dollar will go far instead of cruising the Greek islands in a yacht. He figured if anyone was still interested in owning a salvage yard as such, that someone would have stepped up willing to go through the rigors he went through, right? Well no one did. What does that tell us?
  8. The one simple point that is undenyable is that there is beacoup oil under Alaska but we have given it to the elks so that can hapily frolic their days away......
  9. The next time you have a block of time check this out. This is not some silly U tube crapola but it might give you a new slant on oil, gas and Alaska. http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3340274697167011147
  10. Twitch

    coolant flow

    Look- here's what should work. Loosen and remove the lower hose connection from the radiator. Loosen and remove the upper hose from the radiator. You have removed the clean radiator from the equation. Start the car up and let the water pump circulate the water/coolant through the engine till it pukes out. Turn the heater on so flow circulates into and through the heater hoses. Put a garden hose with the water on in the upper hose and let the engine's water pump circulate the water till it is clear. Then you know the block is clean.
  11. Twitch

    coolant flow

    Just curious why you can't flush now. Old cars are dead easy to get at the lower hose and stick a water hose in the radiator as they run puking out all the gunk. A 15 minute no sweat deal.
  12. Monzas were without a doubt far superior to the Valiant in every sense- looks, handling, power, response, uniqueness. Remember Corvairs Monzas were "sporty" cars that had no translated counterpart in the Valiant econo car line up.
  13. Monzas were without a doubt far superior to the Valiant in every sense- looks, handling, power, response, uniqueness. Remember Corvairs Monzas were "sporty" cars that had no translated counterpart in the Valiant econo car line up.
  14. Certainly no one is going to find a Duesey in a garage for $1,000 but there are tens of thousands of reasobnably priced vintage cars. I mean under $15,000 and often under $10,000. Everybody doesn't desire a Pierce Arrow or Stutz. Even if they were free the upkeep, insurance and hesitation for many to drive them would outweigh any fun factor. There are Nashes, Hudsons, Studebakers, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, postwar Packards, Dodges and Plymouths from the late 30s-50s if you want something different the the ubiquitous Ford or Chevy. In the 60s there are even more selections only at generally lower prices if you don't dream of muscle cars. 60s Camaros and Mustangs can be found that under $15,000. The may be "averge" condition but they'll give a lot of enjoyment for the dollar. From 1958-1969 Fords and Chevies are valued less than 10 grand if you stay away from convertibles and 2-door hardtops. Some are well under 10 Gs. Same goes for Dodges,Pymouths and even Chryslers. Many, models of Olds, Pontiacs, and Buicks are down there. AMCs are at near givaway prices across the board if you want something different. And most of these cars will be about as rare as seeing a Duesenberg at your local crusie in or show at the park. Most of the big boats don't fit in the category of "sought after" so a 66 Olds 98 can lord over the zillion Fords and Chevies that are. I encourage people that attend these functions to start looking and become educated if they express any curious desire of owning a vintage vehicle. I've found lot of guys at retirement age that definitely are goin to need something to do besdies listen to the wife till they die. They have a few bucks and most say "I always wanted one." They may need to recalibrate from 32 LaSalle to a 65 Thunderbird HT but they'll have a car at least. And a lot of these cars can and should be purchased from local sources and even Ebay in certain instances instead of from "collector" publications and sites who will have the prices jacked up. Believe me there are tons of people who know nothing of NADA Gold Book or any other evaluation source for aged autos.
  15. Certainly no one is going to find a Duesey in a garage for $1,000 but there are tens of thousands of reasobnably priced vintage cars. I mean under $15,000 and often under $10,000. Everybody doesn't desire a Pierce Arrow or Stutz. Even if they were free the upkeep, insurance and hesitation for many to drive them would outweigh any fun factor. There are Nashes, Hudsons, Studebakers, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, postwar Packards, Dodges and Plymouths from the late 30s-50s if you want something different the the ubiquitous Ford or Chevy. In the 60s there are even more selections only at generally lower prices if you don't dream of muscle cars. 60s Camaros and Mustangs can be found that under $15,000. The may be "averge" condition but they'll give a lot of enjoyment for the dollar. From 1958-1969 Fords and Chevies are valued less than 10 grand if you stay away from convertibles and 2-door hardtops. Some are well under 10 Gs. Same goes for Dodges,Pymouths and even Chryslers. Many, models of Olds, Pontiacs, and Buicks are down there. AMCs are at near givaway prices across the board if you want something different. And most of these cars will be about as rare as seeing a Duesenberg at your local crusie in or show at the park. Most of the big boats don't fit in the category of "sought after" so a 66 Olds 98 can lord over the zillion Fords and Chevies that are. I encourage people that attend these functions to start looking and become educated if they express any curious desire of owning a vintage vehicle. I've found lot of guys at retirement age that definitely are goin to need something to do besdies listen to the wife till they die. They have a few bucks and most say "I always wanted one." They may need to recalibrate from 32 LaSalle to a 65 Thunderbird HT but they'll have a car at least. And a lot of these cars can and should be purchased from local sources and even Ebay in certain instances instead of from "collector" publications and sites who will have the prices jacked up. Believe me there are tons of people who know nothing of NADA Gold Book or any other evaluation source for aged autos.