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1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 ONE OWNER CAR! *SOLD*


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*SOLD* Yep, you read that correctly--this Candyapple Red Mach 1 was purchased new by a 33-year-old fellow when he assumed control of his family's business. Today, at age 83, he's decided it's time to let it go. He was fairly conservative with the options, selecting the Mach 1 package and upgrading to a 4-barrel carburetor and 4-speed gearbox, so his priorities were in the right place. He also added power steering and brakes, a fold-down rear seat, the cool turn signals mounted on the back of the hood scoop (yep, they work!), and an AM radio. All that makes it fun to drive and easy to live with, which is just how you want your hobby car. Today it shows just 53,568 original miles and it has never seen winter weather. Aside from a repaint in the original color and fresh decals about 20 years ago, it's pretty much original and in fantastic condition. Never wrecked, never rusty, never patched together, it looks and feels like it might have in, say, 1972. The only external demerit is that the chin spoiler has pulled loose of one of its mounting screws.Otherwise it looks awesome--I'd argue that a '69 Mustang fastback is the most attractive example of the breed.

 

The Mach 1 was an upscale model and Ford gave it a semi-luxurious interior with "comfort weave" bucket featuring unique red accents, woodgrained dash panels, rim-blow steering wheel, and a console. The gauges all work, as do the courtesy lights, and the original radio was replaced with a period AM/FM unit that works correctly as well. I suspect that the carpets have been replaced but everything else is unquestionably original, including seat covers, door panels, and headliner. The 4-speed carries a Hurst shifter and that cool clock on the passenger's side was also part of the Mach 1 package. Fold-down rear seats make it a practical pony car and that is quite likely the original spare tire in the trunk. 

 

The M-code 351 Windsor V8 is the car's original, matching-numbers engine and it makes a rather impressive 290 horsepower, same as the Boss 302. It has never been out of the car or disassembled, and it remains completely stock. It was probably detailed a bit when the car was repainted, but it looks appropriately dressed, neither too nice nor excessively deteriorated, and it runs great. Quick start, easy idle, and plenty of torque at any speed. I'd argue that a small block car is more entertaining to drive since it handles better without an extra 200 pounds on the nose, and I can't imagine a big block being notably faster. The 4-speed racks through the gears like a bolt-action rifle thanks to that Hurst shifter and it has relatively modest 3.25 gears so it's very friendly in the real world. It was undercoated when it was new, so it's not all shiny underneath, but there's zero rust, no damage in the torque boxes, and you can spot bits of the original red oxide primer here and there where the undercoating has worn off. It has newer shocks, rebuilt brakes, and I am willing to believe that might just be the original exhaust system--it's quiet, maybe too quiet. Factory styled steel wheels are original to the car and carry 205/70/14 Goodyear radials. 

 

Extras include a Deluxe Marti Report confirming all the specifications and options.

 

This car was owned all its life by a genuine car guy who didn't need to drive it every day. It was obviously loved and given how easy these are to modify, it's nice to see it completely stock. It's not a show piece and it probably isn't going to qualify for HPOF, but an original, unrestored, one-owner car is still a neat find. And if you like Mustangs, there aren't many more appealing than a 1969 fastback of any kind. Asking price is $44,900 and it's ready to rock right now. Thanks for looking!

 

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Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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A 2-barrel H-code 351 Windsor was standard in the Mach 1 in 1969. The 351 Cleveland showed up in 1970, but even at that point it was kind of random--if you ordered a 351 it could be either a Cleveland or a Windsor. They were both H-code. They were both rated the same, so I think the factory used whatever was available on that particular day. It was only at higher RPM that the Cleveland really came alive and given all the Mustang 5.0 upgrades that are virtual bolt-ons for the Windsor, I think the gap between them is zero at this point. In fact, I might rather have the Windsor's more robust bottom end and a set of aftermarket aluminum heads painted to match the engine so nobody notices...

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Thank You for the education Matt. My ‘69 had the Cleveland, likely NOM. Back in the early 70’s we did not care about originality, just wanted to go fast. Since my car was 4 years old when I got it and had been through the drag racing wars who knows what it had for guts from the factory. Your car with the Marti Report has its provenance. Again, Thank You!

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9 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

A 2-barrel H-code 351 Windsor was standard in the Mach 1 in 1969. The 351 Cleveland showed up in 1970, but even at that point it was kind of random--if you ordered a 351 it could be either a Cleveland or a Windsor. They were both M-code. They were both rated the same, so I think the factory used whatever was available on that particular day. It was only at higher RPM that the Cleveland really came alive and given all the Mustang 5.0 upgrades that are virtual bolt-ons for the Windsor, I think the gap between them is zero at this point. In fact, I might rather have the Windsor's more robust bottom end and a set of aftermarket aluminum heads painted to match the engine so nobody notices...

 

Matt,  I'm not 100% sure on this.   I believe that in 1970 the H was the Windsor 2 barrel and the M was the Cleveland 4 barrel.   There was nothing random and you could not get the Cleveland with a 2 barrel or the Windsor with a 4.

 

Nice car by the way,  good luck with the sale.  Real one owner cars like that rarely exist,  especially muscle cars.

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

 

Matt,  I'm not 100% sure on this.   I believe that in 1970 the H was the Windsor 2 barrel and the M was the Cleveland 4 barrel.   There was nothing random and you could not get the Cleveland with a 2 barrel or the Windsor with a 4.

 

Nice car by the way,  good luck with the sale.  Real one owner cars like that rarely exist,  especially muscle cars.

 

That's certainly possible, but all the information out there is very inconsistent--like information overload where there are too many experts with slightly different opinions. I found one article that says:

 

The 1970 Mustang offered two versions of the 351C, the H-code with two-barrel carburetor, and the M-code four-barrel, which also had higher compression cylinder heads (10.7:1 vs. 9.5:1), using closed—or quench-type—combustion chambers vs. open-type for the two-barrel. The two-barrel received the same 250-horsepower rating as the 1969 351W two-barrel, which also was tagged H-code. The 351C replaced the 351W in the Mustang (and Mercury Cougar) for 1970, although some ’70 models received the Windsor two-barrel, according to Kevin Marti, who uses licensed Ford build data to create the Marti Reports.

 

I also found this:

T = 200 1 V 6 cylinder
L = 250 1 V 6 cylinder
G = 302 Boss
F = 302 2 V
H = 351 Windsor
H = 351 Windsor or Cleveland 2 V (1970 Mustang only)

M = 351 Cleveland 4 V
S = 390 4 V (1969 Mustang only)
R = 428 CJ
Q = 428 4 V CJ
Z = 429 4 V Boss

 

Ford wasn't very good at documentation or consistency so things like this get frustrating. I don't honestly know what the answer really is. It does look like that in 1970, the 4-barrel engines were all Clevelands, but beyond that...? Who knows?

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8 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Ford wasn't very good at documentation or consistency so things like this get frustrating. I don't honestly know what the answer really is. It does look like that in 1970, the 4-barrel engines were all Clevelands, but beyond that...? Who knows?

 

It would be interesting if anyone has ever seen a factory 2 barrel Cleveland.  Didn't think such a thing existed,  but who knows?

 

Good luck with the sale.   Love the car.   The best thing about a Mustang is that you order any part down to the tiniest screw off the Internet and have it in 48 hours.

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well the word Cleveland is stuck in everyones head. All I ever heard all of my life was, is it a Cleveland. The Windsor was every bit as good a motor.

My Dad had a new 1970 galaxy 500 with the windsor. That thing could rip!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If I wtd, could have torn the tires right off of it.

 

The word Cleveland is grossly overrated! :) They were both great motors.

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3 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

It would be interesting if anyone has ever seen a factory 2 barrel Cleveland.  Didn't think such a thing existed,  but who knows?

 

Good luck with the sale.   Love the car.   The best thing about a Mustang is that you order any part down to the tiniest screw off the Internet and have it in 48 hours.

 

I know that later Mustangs came with 2-barrel Clevelands--I had a '73 Mustang convertible with a factory 2-barrel Cleveland V8, which was one of the more popular engine options. But I don't know about 1970.

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According to "The Complete Ford Book" (copyright 1970 by Peterson Publishing) the 351 engines in 1969 were all Windsor's as already stated. In 1970 the original plan was to have all 2 barrel engines to be Windsors and all 4 barrel engines to be Clevelands. Ford found that they could not fill all the 2 barrel requirements with Windsor engines so about 15% of cars delivered had Cleveland engines. There was no way to specify what you were getting and the only way to know was to check under the hood of your car.

Of course all of this does not affect this Mach 1, which is a great car!

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird Colonial White

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The Mustang enters

11 hours ago, K8096 said:

The new owner can take it to the old strip in Vegas and recreate the chase scene in Diamonds Are Forever, albeit the one in the movie was a year newer.   

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vI85g6KLoQ

 

The Mustang enters the alley driving on the right side tires and exits driving on the left side tires.

 

Jim Vesely

 

ROA # 7437

 

BCA # 39477

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