flackmaster

Delahaye wanted - please.

Recommended Posts

I am one year into contracting Delahaye Fever.  It seems the only cure is to own one, therefore I am in the market for a project Delahaye, if there are any still out there.  I am willing to start with anything -  burned, rusted, rolled, or otherwise given up for dead, late pre-war or postwar, i.e. 135 chassis.  Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes please.  I am particularly interested in a late 30's to postwar car.  Any condition, although my budget limits me to a car requiring restoration.  Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow...Delahaye overload.  And I definitely see some affordable cars, not just the flamboyant show princesses.  And in the "just shoot me now" category was the Delahaye at the RM Hershey auction - any explanation as to the selling price on that one?  Seemed like a steal to me?  Thank you for the links.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rmsothebys.com/hf16/hershey/lots/1946-delahaye-135-m-coach-by-guillore/1080171

 

Lot 145

1946 Delahaye 135 M Coach by Guilloré

Chassis no. 800410
Sold for $77,000

95 bhp, 3,557 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with single Solex carburetor, Cotal electro-mechanical four-speed transmission, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring, live rear axle with quarter-elliptical leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel mechanically actuated Bendix drum brakes. Wheelbase: 114 in.

Offered from 56 years of ownership
Elegant and well-proportioned closed coachwork
Equipped with its original engine
Classic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full Classic


The Delahaye’s 135, introduced in Paris in 1935, was a rare model that straddled both the pre-war and post-war eras. It boasted a brand new chassis with the same 3.6-liter, six-cylinder engine first seen in the earlier Type 138, and it proved to be a remarkable automobile upon its release. One year later, Delahaye introduced the 135 M, which offered a slightly larger engine with improved horsepower and was offered with a choice of single, dual, or triple carburetors. The 135 proved to more than hold its own in competition, as it swept the top six places at Marseilles in 1936.

In the following years, leading up to the beginning of the Second World War, the 135 further cemented its reputation, taking 2nd overall at Le Mans in 1937 and 1st, 2nd, and 4th the following year. Outside of Le Mans, Delahaye 135s also took 1st at the Rallye Monte Carlo in 1937 and 1939.

Following the conclusion of the War, production of the Type 135 resumed and continued with the same 3.6-liter engine used before the war. By this time, the company was nearing its end, as the French government had placed large taxes on cars with displacement over three liters. Even today, six decades after the final Delahaye was produced, the famous 135-series cars remain very highly regarded as some of the most compelling French automobiles ever produced.

CHASSIS NUMBER 800410

The early post-war Delahaye 135 M offered here, chassis number 800410, was beautifully crafted by the famed French coachbuilder A. Guilloré as a five-passenger coach, with excellent and well-proportioned lines and styling. According to the current owner, the car was subsequently delivered to an original owner in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where it was acquired in 1952 by Canadian enthusiast Ralph McNight and exported to Quebec. Subsequent Québécois owners were Jean Charest and Leon Frechon, before the current owner purchased the car in 1960.

In over half a century of care, the car has had its original “matching numbers” engine gone over and fitted with new bearings, during a thorough overall of the chassis before a full body-off restoration, performed in 1993 by well-known Canadian craftsman Peter Fawcett. The body was refinished in a subtle and attractive two-tone metallic color scheme, which contrasts beautifully with the handsomely appointed red leather interior. The owner reports that the car has always been well maintained during his ownership, including recent re-lining of the brakes and new batteries. It is accompanied by a collection of original paperwork, including owner’s and parts manuals, and documentation of ownership back to 1953, as well as by various spares, including a rare manifold for the factory triple-carburetor option.

Offered from an excellent long-term home, this stylish Delahaye would be a wonderful addition to the collection of any connoisseur of French motor cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one Delahaye  in my collection of restorable cars  this is a 1947 135m  2 door  coupe  bodied by brandome 

the restoration has been started  

and one  Delahaye in my street rod projects 1948 135 m Dubois body 2 door pillarless hardtop  this was to be a parts car for the restoration project   i do not have the original frame or engine for this car 

these cars are both for sale as the pair or individually 

both cars have clean registered titles in our name

 

if you are indeed serious please contact me 814-341-5596 

i would much rather talk in person than try to post things online 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update - the above opportunity did not work out.  I am still looking for the right project, Delahaye, Delage, Talbot, etc.  thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Again

It is quite a long time ago that I owned a Delahaye. But in more recent years with 1920's Citroen and Renaults I found it almost impossible for anyone outside France to even get a reply from adverts on "leboncoin".

Below are photographs of my 1948/9 Delahaye I got as far as having it drivable. Under that bulbous skin it was basically a pre-war chassis with angle iron extensions to support the overhanging body. I have no idea where it went to.  I have never seen or heard of it since.

In the late 1940's and early 50s there were a number of newish Delahayes and Delage cars in Melbourne Australia. There is a very strong Pre-war (Vintage) Delage Club in Australia.

 

Bernie j.

.5a909b4b45961_LCESNL.1.thumb.jpeg.fdd53ea1dc0ca9d76691016c852cd606.jpeg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leboncoin will not expose seller email addresses to computers outside of France (or Europe, anyway). I wrote to them, and they told me it was for security. I have written to some advertisers via the website, but have never received a reply.  Some of the advertisers  include their telephone numbers in the ads, however. You must be prepared to speak French, of course!

 

Philip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, I'm French, if you want I can ask questions to advertise leboncoin  in your place

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Delahaye 135m similar to the one shown in pic by "Old Car"...a 1950 with "Pontoon" style body by coachbuilder "Guillore". A long running restoration project since 1969! I have bought some parts through Leboncoin and yes, you generally have to speak some French. Parts are very hard to come by and can be horrendously expensive. I have this car to running stage but need to have about half the body remade as it is rusted out....then a complete retrim. (Australia got about 10 of these cars after an ex Le Mans 135MS won the Australian Grand Prix in 1949.)  So am probably looking at about $80k to finish! If you are hoping to pick up a cheap car somewhere and  restore it on a budget, I suggest you consider something different. Bear in mind that only 2200 cars were built between 1934 and 1954 and there were about 1000 body styles from 100 coachbuilders...so not many spare parts and no panelwork. Also, the Yanks love them and can outbid you big time.

Regards, Jamo (South Gippsland, Vic) Update...just found my receipt from Bernie dated 22/3/1969 so definitely was his car!slide026.thumb.jpg.f64fbe91e7e58373b21cdaf8f5226679.jpg

Edited by jamo
New Information (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David,

 

Did you get a Delahaye? 

 

If the answer is no and you still want one, how about this one?

 

What's that? You think not!😲

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now