DavidMc

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About DavidMc

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  1. Lotus: Lots of trouble usually serious
  2. I have had Optima batteries in my 1920's cars for 20 years. The red top is the one you want, its a starting current battery, the yellow top is a deep cycle battery more suited to use in an RV. I had an Optima last 11 years and another only 3 years but I was not keeping them on charge at all times. I now use the correct smart chargers left on all the time the cars are not in use and I expect this will give them a longer life. I bought a 6V red top recently for a friend and had a lot of trouble finding a vendor with one in stock here in Australia, maybe they are more available in US. They use to be readily available here a few years ago. If they are allowed to run flat they can be re-charged but not with the typical home charger.
  3. I have had similar problems with a similar car , it was a wheel alignment issue. I took the front axle to a truck axle repair company and had them re-align the king pin inclination relative to the flats faces where the springs fit. It was way out. I had the same done to two others 1920's cars and they all steer well now with none of the problems you describe. You need to tell the truck alignment guys the king pin inclination.
  4. Six or Eight cylinder?
  5. Similar to an Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane but the grille badge does not match?
  6. Good question, firstly I have always understood that it is standard practice to have the throttle fully open. Thinking about it I guess that if the throttle is closed , the intake stroke will not fill the cylinders as much as if it was open resulting in a lower pressure compression stroke. That said I have never done a comparison, might try it. What do others say?
  7. Don't forget to open the throttle wide when testing or you will get a lower compression reading
  8. I have an AC Messenger with original seats if you need details to copy
  9. No need to fit an electric pump, just fill the vac tank with some fuel and use it as a gravity feed supply. If you connect the vacuum line it is likely it will work.
  10. That short section of tubing attached to the top of your vacuum tank is the suction line that needs to be extended to connect to a nipple on the underside of the intake manifold around the centre. You can't see it, need to feel for it. The "T" is for a vacuum line from the same location to drive the wipers.. The vent is open to atmosphere. The are many articles on line with detailed information and drawings showing the Stewart Warner vacuum tank.
  11. I see in the photo above David posted how the ring is separate from the wheel nut. Just to be clear, that ring holds the wheel to the hub, that large hex headed piece with the logo is screwed into the hub center internal thread and is decorative only. The rings are left hand thread on one side and RH on the other.
  12. We call them "C" spanners here in Australia, I called it a wrench because it a US based forum. One of many different car related names.
  13. Looks the same as the wrench for the 24" Rudge Whitworth wheels on my 1922 Packard 126 except that mine is marked 80 not 100.
  14. I have restored two open cars using professionally steam bent bows. In both cases I had to stiffen the horizontal part of most of the bows to prevent them bending when the top material was pulled tight. I stiffened them by shaping wood to fit neatly under the bow blending in at the curved ends. The trimmer who did the work on the tops said that this is usually needed. However your problem is a little different in that the bows have curved before there is any load on them, it will be interesting to see if your solution works but you may need to stiffen them even if that works. A bit off topic, the man who made the bows also makes bows by laminating and gluing thin strips of wood around a former. I believe the advantage of making them this way is that it is possible to achieve a tighter radius. It is also easier for DIY as steam is not required.