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Pierce Arrow


alsancle
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Thanks Ed - that's the impression I got. When I get serious in a couple of years I won't start my search looking for it..... too bad, unless something catastrophic occurred it should have still been a nice driver quality Pierce. 1933 was a great year and it was a great car for long Sunday drives or even vacations to Vermont and New Hampshire.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Under total restoration on the west coast. It’s being done correctly by a shop that has done a bunch of Pierce Arrow’s. I’m looking forward to seeing it in the near future.

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That car need NO help, it’s a fantastic car.........It’s just you car snob high faulting taste that is the problem. If you look close you can read the factory bumper sticker! ?

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I'm bitterly unhappy about the burgundy one I had last year. I was talking to the seller about keeping it myself--he was a friend and we were working out a way for me to put such a valuable car in my collection. I would have liquidated everything else, but I felt it would have been worth it and he was willing to wait for payment in full. I'd been admiring the car for 15 years. Then a buyer showed up willing to pay full asking price, and I didn't feel it would be ethical to not take the money for my client. So I sold the car.


Months later, it was with another dealer with a giant price tag. I don't know if the buyer didn't want it after all or the dealer bought it and lied to me about the buyer, but it slipped out of my hands and is now out of reach forever. I'm none too pleased about any of that. When I saw that Mecum link in the preview pane, I feared for the worst and thought it was "my" car heading for the dumping ground that is Mecum.

 

Sometimes doing the right thing will get you screwed in the end.

 

 

012.JPG

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I have encountered the attached coupe below twice.   First, not too many years ago when it was sitting in the car corral at Hershey with a very reasonable sale price attached and "SOLD" stamped over it.   The car was not 1/2 way down the trailer when it was sold.   Second,  when the very astute collector (a really nice guy with some great cars) brought on a caravan that I was on.   I really like these coupes.

 

I'm going to say that the yellow car is probably worth a very slight premium over comparable correct eight cylinder car.   Definitely cool,  but you do lose some of the audience on an engine swap.

IMG_2222 (1).JPG

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

I have this vague recollection that Richie Clyne owns the convertible so he would definitely do a trade if there was profit in it for him.   Semi-rough car with new interior is kind of scary though.

I don't mind a driver/ beater type car,  but I doubt there is any upper hand in a trade for my car for him,  so It probably wouldn't work.  Scares me a little as well,  having compression and oil pressure but not running?  Doesn't take much more to get it running unless there is something expensive wrong,  not mentioned. 

It's a whole lot easier to move under it's own power, that to push and winch to move it around a shop. 

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

Who knows (Eddy?)  how many of the production Silver Arrows had sidemounts and how many did not?  Also breakdown of 12 vs 8.   Is the 12 warmed over like the show cars?

AJ, after acquiring my production SA coupe in 2006 I searched the PAS master database for any 1934-35 SAs ever registered with PAS (since 1957).  The results were:  1934 8s = 4, 1934 12s = 6, 1935 8s = 1, 1935 12s = 2.  Grand total of 13.  (BTW, my 1934 is an 8 without sidemounts--which I think shows off the lines better, although it renders trunk space absolutely minimal).

 

Estimated production each year:  The production SAs used the Y body code, and sequential body numbers did not distinguish between 8s and 12s, although the engineering prefix to the body number did (244 = 8 and 344 = 12).  PAS records the highest known 1934 sequential Y body number as 43 (began at "1")--therefore, at least 43 SAs were built that year.  For 1935, the sequential body numbers began at 100, and the highest known number is 104, meaning at least 5 were built in 1935.  PAS records include not only cars registered with us but any identifiable cars in the few surviving employee notes or service records.

 

PAS records do not indicate whether a car has sidemounts, but with 13 extant, that could be a long winter evening's project with Google Images.

 

To my knowledge, by 1934-35 there was only the 462 cid V-12 and it was not warmed over for production cars--not including Ab Jenkins's 1934 Bonneville run.

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

Not sure what is better looking.  The dude in the car,  or the car itself.

IMG_4246.jpg

 

 

I've long been an admirer of Pierce-Arrows and am pleased that my youngest son recently announced that Pierce-Arrow was his favorite kind of car. But that's just ugly. 


Nice car, though.

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Are congratulations in order?  I won't comment on the relative attractiveness of man and car but will say you look great together!

 

Just in time for the PAS Annual Meet in Rohnert Park, CA (near Santa Rosa), July 9-13 with add-on thru Monday the 16th.  Let me know, please, if you and/or the coupe can make it.

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7 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Nice car, though.

 

I have a buddy that reacts to Pierce Arrow like it was Viagra.   If you listen long enough you start to realize they are grossly underappreciated.  Ball bearings on the spring shackles instead of bushings and what not.

 

Been lucky enough to drive 3 different models,  all V12 (2 36 and 1 35) and the power and speed is really impressive.  I've never really gotten going  fast in the same era Packard V12 (never over 30 mph)  so I can't give first hand comparisons, unfortunately.

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2 minutes ago, alsancle said:

I've never really gotten going  fast in the same era Packard V12 (never over 30 mph)

And unless the gearing has been changed, you wouldn't be comfortable doing so.  ? Hell, I drive my 1918 Pierce 48-B-5 dual valve, 7'8" tall with the top up, almost twice that--55 mph.  This will get the Packard boys and girls spun up!

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  • 4 months later...

That 32 is a fantastic car...........interestingly the wright up in the auction wasn’t completely accurate. I have the history on that car from day one.......along with an interesting story about it. Who ever bought it should contact me. Ed

 

And for the record.......Pierce used Torrington roller bearings on the clutch and brake pedals........every other car from Rolls, Packard, and Duesenberg used bushing as far as I am familiar with..........the Pierce twelve used bearings in the distributor..........only two others did that........Cadillac V-16 and Marmon V-16. 

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I didn't go look at it while at the Fall Meet. Looking forward to talking to the new owner. Properly restored it has First In Class all over it for Pebble.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It runs and drives great when I was in it about two or three years ago........helped out the restoration shop who sorted it. Fantastic car.

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  • 8 months later...

Mecum has a surprising number of nice prewar cars at Monterrey this year,  including this Pierce club sedan.

 

  • AACA Senior Grand National Award, 2002
  • Concours restoration completed in 1990 by White Post Restorations in White Post, Virginia
  • 366 CI L-head inline 8-cylinder engine
  • 4-speed selective sliding manual gearbox
  • Semi-elliptic front and rear leaf springs
  • Bendix duo-servo mechanical drum brakes
  • Two-tone Tan and White finish with matching trunk
  • Woodgrain dash and door sills
  • Luggage rack
  • Dual side mount spares with accessory mirrors
  • Dual wipers
  • Archer mascot
  • Painted wire wheels with chrome centers
  • Wide Whitewall tires

Pierce-Arrow produced its Model 43 for one year only, 1931, eventually completing a run of only 2,591 units. The Model 43 Club Sedan offered here from the prestigious Academy of Art University Collection is a multiple-award-winning example that was restored in 1990 to concours condition by White Post Restorations of White Post, Virginia, a renowned leader in the automotive restoration business since 1940. The Model 43 was the product of the luxury automaker’s efforts to increase market share at the outset of the Great Depression. Manufactured on both 134- and 137-inch wheelbases, the Model 43 benefited from the new-generation inline 8-cylinder L-head engine introduced by Pierce-Arrow in 1929. The new engine was a departure from the relatively inefficient powerplants that characterized earlier Pierce-Arrows, displacing 366 CI and employing a 3.5-inch bore and 4.75-inch stroke, a new dual venturi carburetor on a matching duplex manifold, a Delco starter, ignition and generator, and a completely submerged push-type oil pump. Rated at 125 HP, it was not only a full 50 HP more powerful than the inline-6 it replaced, but 100 pounds lighter and, combined with a 4-speed selective sliding gearbox, capable of pushing the new car past 85 MPH. Conventional mechanicals included semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension and highly effective Bendix duo-servo mechanical drum brakes. Painted in two-tone tan and white with a matching trunk and folding luggage rack and led by the famous “Archer” mascot, this Model 43 Club Sedan also features a plush white leather interior with wood-grain dash and door sills, dual side-mount spares with accessory mirrors, dual wipers and wide whitewalls on painted wire wheels with chromed center caps. Scarcely driven since its restoration, the car earned an AACA Senior Grand National Award in 2002.

1932-Pierce-ClubSedan.jpg

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On 7/3/2019 at 8:49 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Unfortunate about the colors.

My experience via Significantcars.com is that the buyers are not fond of tan's, brown's (stay around brown), tan/brown, tan/brown/orange, white, some light grey's (depends on car), most greens (except English sports cars in BRG or some 60's Mercedes), certain things in resale red, and ....

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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