Jump to content

Pierce Arrow


alsancle
 Share

Recommended Posts

41 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

My experience via Significantcars.com is that the buyers are not fond of tan's, brown's (stay around brown), tan/brown, tan/brown/orange, white, some light grey's (depends on car), most greens (except English sports cars in BRG or some 60's Mercedes), certain things in resale red, and ....

 

If you look at your average vehicle passing you down the street,   75% of them will be Black, Silver, Gray.

 

Maroon seems to stay in style,   Red was formerly "Resale Red" but is now closer to "Rejected Red".

 

I think it is West that says the wheels and fenders should always be darker than the body if more than one color.   I personally like monotone.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

The cream colored Pierce Club Sedan was restored at White Post Restorations, I know because I was there when it came in, and took the interior out of it.

 

No secret as to cost of restoration, the then owner advertised it in Hemmings stating he had $272,000 dollars in the restoration.  There's more to the story but I'll leave it at that.  It's a great car with awful paint and interior, from a classy viewpoint.

 

The bracket headlight '35 Pierce "convertible coupe" on Ebay has a lot wrong with it, starting with the fact that it's probably a cut-down coupe.  No provisions for top irons, no compartment behind front seat, lots of details incorrect.  It's a car one would have to start over on the restoration, and even then not have much to work with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

As the professors used to assign us: Please enumerate the many expensive things wrong with this 1935, compare and contrast to what is correct.  We stand ready to be informed what is correct and how to recognize it.

Rumble seat looks like they copied a 1929-32 access panel (the second, hinged piece), and eliminated or covered luggage tray/top well behind seats, lack of power brake pedal & suspicious lines on the differential indicates a conversion to hydraulic brakes, trunk rack & hardware are home-brew, no R/S step plates, no running board chrome strips, door jamb closure geometry is wrong, don't see any wood trim on top of doors (just home-brew rubber flaps), don't see ANY provision for top mechanism, 35's did not have fake vent windows, wrong fan, wrong head nuts, wrong oil filter & lines, wrong side-mount cover, etc.

Or that MAY be a 1929-32 deck and rumble seat section.

At least it has ONE P-A gauge!

The chassis number is wrong, also - should be seven digits starting with "20" with "9" in the fourth digit indicating assembly in Canada.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

As the professors used to assign us: Please enumerate the many expensive things wrong with this 1935, compare and contrast to what is correct.  We stand ready to be informed what is correct and how to recognize it.

I hit "submit" before I added the important info that most of the above comment came from my Evil Twin (we are often mistaken for one another, so I blame everything on him), Bob J (not a member here), who has a 1934 conv coupe which is virtually identical to a 1935.  He also has two 1933s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/29/2018 at 10:58 AM, Grimy said:

AJ, after acquiring my production SA coupe in 2006 I searched the PAS master database for any 1934-35 SAs ever registered with PAS (since 1957).  The results were:  1934 8s = 4, 1934 12s = 6, 1935 8s = 1, 1935 12s = 2.  Grand total of 13.  (BTW, my 1934 is an 8 without sidemounts--which I think shows off the lines better, although it renders trunk space absolutely minimal).

 

Estimated production each year:  The production SAs used the Y body code, and sequential body numbers did not distinguish between 8s and 12s, although the engineering prefix to the body number did (244 = 8 and 344 = 12).  PAS records the highest known 1934 sequential Y body number as 43 (began at "1")--therefore, at least 43 SAs were built that year.  For 1935, the sequential body numbers began at 100, and the highest known number is 104, meaning at least 5 were built in 1935.  PAS records include not only cars registered with us but any identifiable cars in the few surviving employee notes or service records.

 

PAS records do not indicate whether a car has sidemounts, but with 13 extant, that could be a long winter evening's project with Google Images.

 

To my knowledge, by 1934-35 there was only the 462 cid V-12 and it was not warmed over for production cars--not including Ab Jenkins's 1934 Bonneville run.

 

There is another Y code car out there, unknown to the world........except to a wonderful young, good looking guy from the east coast. In time , you will learn more about it. 🤫

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Thanks for the detailed analysis of this '35, obviously trying to make it into something it wasn't originally.  What's to become of such cars....?

 

It'll get "restored" by someone who doesn't know right from wrong and who figures "good enough" is good enough, then passed around among non-experts until someone tries to display it at a major event or sells it to the wrong person.

 

Grimy and Ed saved me from making an expensive mistake on this fright pig (which has since been donated to the Petersen Museum--you'd think those guys would do their homework, no?):

 

002.thumb.JPG.3454c734936b46cd2c372fe98241095e.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazing how many fellows who should be familiar enough with body design and details in that period can not recognize a badly modified coupe such as this.  The telltale is always the cowl and front door upper edge that were treated completely differently than a roadster or phaeton.  Only the convertible coupe and convertible sedans are like the closed cars.  But roadsters and phaetons are always the most desirable and expensive so the financial motivation to create a deception for gain to foist on the unschooled is strong. 

Edited by 58L-Y8 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...