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jrbartlett

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About jrbartlett

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  1. My guess is primarily the 1930s, peaking mid-decade. The need for them declined with the advent of sealed-beam headlights, plus the introduction of more streamlined front-end design that made them look anachronistic later in the decade.
  2. To me, these look like the mountings for the Junior-series Tripp lights. A set of these lights was on one of my cars when I bought it. I left them on because they really help with night driving.
  3. Odd how popular continental kits are today, considering that when I was growing up in the 1950s we really did not see them very often.
  4. Two possibilities that are seemingly opposite each other. The lugs could have been too loose, or too tight. Either one will do it. Supposed to tighten them periodically with a torque wrench to the proper foot-pounds.
  5. Missing the opportunity to spend time with my mother during her last months of healthy life; she died in November at age 104. Beginning in March she was quarantined in the elder-care facility due to COVID precautions, and then in July she was actually diagnosed with COVID and had to be moved to a skilled nursing facility. She later tested negative and returned to her own apartment in the initial facility, which was still on lockdown. She was going downhill physically and mentally, and I suspect she had long-term affects from both COVID and the resulting isolation from family that both played a
  6. Best method I've seen is to use a lacquer stick. Do a search and you'll find a number of vendors. Back when I was a kid working in the family business machine company repairing adding machines and typewriters, a lot of the plastic keys had lost the color from their engraved letters and numbers. We used lacquer sticks to quickly and easily fill them in. It was quite thick, so you could just rub it on the key and then wipe it, and the lacquer would naturally stay in the indentations. Then just let it dry for a while.
  7. There was a '33 Dietrich V-12 coupe that was bought new in Houston and lived here until the '90s. My father was second in line to buy the car back in the 1960s for $10,000. He needed one day to get the money out of the bank, but another guy (a friend) walked in with that much cash in his pockets. The seller needed the cash that day to get out of a financial/legal jam. Sometimes, you just need a little more luck in this hobby. We always knew just what a treasure the car was, and both my dad and the other guy had made long-standing offers to buy it. The car was great running and looking, totally
  8. ALFARMS -- What pages do you need from that '09-'10 book? It looks familiar, so I may have one of those books.
  9. I was in the Navy Seabees in the Mekong Delta in '69 and '70. When I got back, I felt like everything had changed. I went back to college and with my short hair and military habits (neatness, cleanliness and working to support myself) the long-hairs kept calling me a "Narc." I wasn't. The GI Bill was almost worthless, paying only $150 a month at the time. Meanwhile the music had gone to pot -- literally I guess. But some of the college professors really liked me, because they were probably World War II and Korea vets. I wasn't in the anti-war movement, but I certainly wasn't a war-monger eithe
  10. My father is one of the sailors on deck in this famous photograph of the cruiser U.S.S. Phoenix as it passed the burning U.S.S. Arizona in the background. He served the entire Pacific war on this ship, rising to warrant officer. Meanwhile his future wife, my mother, operated a traveling crane at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, lifting batteries out of submarines. In fact they met near the yard in 1946. They both considered themselves proud veterans. And surprisingly, in later years they bought Japanese and German cars and even did business with a Japanese manufacturer of electronic cash registers.
  11. 35 years ago. Guess I wasn't paying attention back then.
  12. I'm always turned off by Chevy truck ads that show one of the trucks pulling a brand-new broke-down Ford. Occurs to me that if you can't talk about the virtues of your own truck without running down the other guy's, maybe your truck doesn't have any virtues. Sure enough, Ram has now passed Chevy in pickup sales, while Ford remains first.
  13. A friend who's into fire trucks called and said one of his buddies has two straight-8 Pierce Arrow/Seagraves engine blocks and a crankshaft that he needs to get rid of due to losing warehouse space. These are in Houston and are free, sitting on a pallet. I don't know the condition but could go have a look, and could also check on if there are any other parts. Does anyone have interest? Contact me at jamesandeileen@comcast.net.
  14. A friend who's into fire trucks called and said one of his buddies has two straight-8 Pierce Arrow/Seagraves engine blocks and a crankshaft that he needs to get rid of due to losing warehouse space. These are in Houston and are free, sitting on a pallet. I don't know the condition but could go have a look, and could also check on if there are any other parts. Does anyone have interest? Contact me at jamesandeileen@comcast.net.
  15. A friend who's into fire trucks called and said one of his buddies has two straight-8 Pierce Arrow/Seagraves engine blocks and a crankshaft that he needs to get rid of due to losing warehouse space. These are in Houston and are free, sitting on a pallet. I don't know the condition but could go have a look, and could also check on if there are any other parts. Does anyone have interest? Contact me at jamesandeileen@comcast.net.
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