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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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On 8/7/2018 at 2:54 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Finally, I could store all the wires into the LH door and close it with the trim. Another problem was noticed: when the upper molding was installed, I could not open the vent window on both doors! This is the result of the too low roof at the “A” pillar and the lowering of the vent window frame to prevent the interference with the roof. Fortunately, I could also lower the inner moldings just enough to insure a vent window function.

 

Yesterday was a good day: after pushing away for several days the mating of the body to the frame, I bite the bullet yesterday. Not without issues: I removed the body four times from the frame! The third time, most screws attaching the body to the frame were installed, the rear bumper too, when I noticed that one screw at the “B” pillar could not go in. I began to bore by hand the floor’s hole with tiny drills till one broke, the remaining bit stuck into the hole. The reason of the clogged hole: I used instant glue to attach a wire to the floor and apparently, some glue went into the hole. Of course I did not check every hole prior the assembly, a major mistake.

After the 4th time, no issue was found and the body is sitting definitively on the frame.

Now, I can continue with the rear seat/trim assembly, the heater hoses, and so on.

 

1003 body on frame.JPG

1004 body on frame.JPG

1005 body on frame.JPG

1006 body on frame.JPG

1007 body on frame.JPG

1008 body on frame.JPG

 

 

I would have thought these were photos of an actual MKII in the process of restoration had I not known it was only 1:12 scale.

Really amazing work Roger.

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9 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Roger....if you don't mind my asking, what are you going to use for the rubber weatherstrip around the trunk lid?

John

Most probably nothing. The weatherstrip is, on the original car, glued on the trunk lid itself, a surface which is hardly seen when the trunk is open. On all my models I have no rubber seal at the doors and trunk. If I think that I should do something, I will use a strip of black tape.

The distance between lid and gutter is inconsistent; this is the reason why I'm usually skipping this aspect.

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3 hours ago, Barry Wolk said:

Roger, you continue to astound. 

Will your car have set belts? ;)

Thanks Barry to show that model to people who are not visiting the forums I'm showing it.

Seat belts? What an horror for that period of time! Of course they can save lives, but my model is static, no seat belt is needed. And less parts to do...

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Roger,

 

Seat belts?  They did not even come onto the scene till the sixties.  And then they were an afterthought.  For years we were riding around in our cars unfettered (and un strapped), sliding across the seat to see something that one of our siblings saw on their side of the car.  Of course, we had to see it too.  My little sister use to stand up between my mom and dad in the front seat.  Oh the horrors of un checked safety (or lack of it) back in the 50's.  

 

I swear, if I had the picture of the Mark II blown up, one could swear that that was a full sized automobile.  Your attention to every little detail just amazes me.  It is so accurate in every sense (that we can see).  How you got the body bucks so accurate is mind boggling.  Now we know why it has taken so much time.  Looking at the end results is why.  Perfection.  

 

It is beautiful, Roger.  Each installment that you do is what we look forward to.

 

Randy

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Thanks Randy!

The arm rests were first installed and the wires from the switches soldered at the proper location. I also soldered on a temporary basis the wires coming from the door to be sure about the function. There were some glitches but everything came right. The installation from the seat back was rather difficult, probably because not all elements covered with leather were tried first. Technically, the rear compartment is finished. The seat bottom will be installed (indeed, it will be just pushed in place) when the carpet will be installed.

Then I installed the hoses for both heater and the remaining vacuum hoses.

It was the right time to do the radiator hoses. By searching in my available material, I found a rubber tube which outside diameter is near from what I wanted; I remember I bought that piece of rubber just in case; sometimes I’m lucky! On the real car, the upper hose has slightly smaller outside diameter than the bottom one, but nobody will notice that my hoses have the same dimension! To have a good look, I did also clamps, not the tower style but something I can manage. I slipped into the tubes a suitable brass rod to help the hoses to keep the intended shape, especially the lower one with its 90° angle. The radiator is now installed, I hope that I will not have to remove it again, but you never know!

1009 rear compartment.JPG

1010 with radiator.JPG

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7 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

As usual, I appreciate your comments. However, I'm not sure about the question from John. I did not do myself the electric motors and wiring, nor the various bolts and screws but all the other parts are made in my small workshop.

You understood and answered in a way that I understand. Thank you.

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Roger, I was showing this thread to a friend yesterday and I really wish you could have witnessed the amazement they expressed.  We're used to your incredible work as you keep just doing one jaw dropping task after another for 8 years!  To see someone who isn't used to that try and take in the near finished product all at once was a real treat.  After their initial shock wore off I explained that you started the project by *making* the tires and then took them back to page 1.  It was really fun to watch them try and wrap their brain around the fact that each part was hand made.  Wish you could have been here to see it!!!

 

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Logically, at this point, the trunk trim must be addressed. As with my two previous models, the carpet will be made with velvet because it’s the best material in my opinion, especially for a cut pile carpet. Unfortunately for me, the Mark II has a loop style carpet. Trying to find that would be difficult…Even for the velvet, the color I wanted was difficult to find. I went to many stores; the available colors were not suitable for the model. The last store had more choice: 2! One was too green (could have been fine for the Avanti); I took the dark blue velvet. It’s almost black, but it’s not! A lighter tone would have been welcome…

The velvet has 2 disadvantages: it’s a very thick material for that scale and it frays very easily.

By looking at various pictures from real cars, the trunk trim is made of several trim pieces; each one has a border sewn to the base material. How to replicate that? I tried with a piece of leather which was not very convincing. As a scale model is an illusion, I opted for a “U” profile made with 0.1mm painted brass. Of course, I used the blue paint from the seats inserts.

The next job to finish the trunk compartment is to fit the spare wheel. I have here 2 issues: my tires have a too large diameter, about 2mm and/or the well is not deep enough: the result is that I cannot close the trunk lid when the spare tire is in the trunk! I will try to reduce the diameter on the lathe, giving the impression that the spare tire is well worn and, if necessary, remove material to compensate for the not deep enough well. Then a tire’s cover will have to be made with leather.

 

1011 trunk trim.JPG

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For once, the update is coming the same day! I could not cut the tire but sand it on the lathe. With one mm less in diameter, it was like I did nothing. The tire was too much upright; I had to do some heavy surgeon at the back and down. It’s no wonder: the original tire was either 8.00 x 15 or 8.20 x 15. When I measure the width of my tires, they are more or less like 8.80 x 15 (a dimension which does not exist, it’s just for comparison). Now, as you can see, the tire fits the allowed space and I can close the lid!

Even if I don’t need it, I will do the attaching fixture for the wheel and the cover.

 

 

 

1012 With spare wheel.JPG

1013 Closed lid.JPG

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With the spare wheel securely attached to the body, I did the spare wheel cover with leather. The fit is not as good as on the real car because I cannot include a zipper at the back! Anyway, the cover is not too bad looking and can be removed just in case, as well as the spare wheel.

1014 spare wheel cover.JPG

1015 spare wheel cover.JPG

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In one forum I got the constructive critic that the cover for the spare wheel was too shiny. It was that way because I wanted to spare the associated work by spraying the paint with the airbrush and applied the paint with …a brush. The paint was thicker and, therefore shiny. As there were other unpleasant issues with that cover, I did a new one, using thicker leather. The result is more pleasant and the shine more realistic.

1016 new spare wheel cover.JPG

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Would never has thought it would be such a dramatic difference and certainly never noticed anything at all wrong with the first one.  With the two posts close together, however, the difference is clear.  The really great craftsman and artists are the ones that can see their work through other eyes and take something that is already great and make it even better.  More fantastic work Roger!

 

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Roger,

Great looking spare cover.  One question.  Are you going to make the jack and handle and label for the inside of the trunk lid?

 

I was wondering (on the 1:1 Continental) where they had the jack and handle strapped inside the trunk?  Was in in the fender pocket on the side or up on the back shelf?

Anyway, I am sure that you have been thinking about that issue.  The model has so many features, I did not know if the jack and handle were on your "radar".  Also, where was the trunk light mounted?  On the trunk lid or on the side? Or did they have one?  

 

Randy

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Thanks Jeff! Honestly, without that comment from a scale model forum, I would have let it that way. I do appreciate critics when justified and I don't regret to have done a second one (the fist one is free for somebody wanted to make a Mark II scale model!). I was lucky too, because it's not unusual that the second part is worse than the first one. the thicker leather was most certainly beneficial.

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3 minutes ago, Randiego said:

Roger,

Great looking spare cover.  One question.  Are you going to make the jack and handle and label for the inside of the trunk lid?

 

I was wondering (on the 1:1 Continental) where they had the jack and handle strapped inside the trunk?  Was in in the fender pocket on the side or up on the back shelf?

Anyway, I am sure that you have been thinking about that issue.  The model has so many features, I did not know if the jack and handle were on your "radar".  Also, where was the trunk light mounted?  On the trunk lid or on the side? Or did they have one?  

 

Randy

Thanks Randy! Yes, when all is done, I will do that terrific jack. I did not event thought about the label; I have to search in my pictures if I see one. As I gave recently an order for decals, it may be too late as I will be away for some time.

The bumper jack was installed on the side of the RH rear fender and also just behind the spare wheel, flat on the floor. I don't remember right now which version was the first one. Mine will be place behind the spare wheel. There is a hook at wich the jack is attached; I skipped the hook for practical reason and I will find a method to secure the jack.

There is a lamp inside the trunk; it is installed on the cover allowing access to the lid lock. As I will certainly redo the exterior emblem at the trunk lid, this cover is not yet installed. Of course, my lamp is a dummy one.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Since a very long time, the LH front fender had a bad paint, because when I sanded to clear coat to eliminate some imperfections, I went too far and sanded the color coat.  Later, I wanted to paint that fender, but I got various steps like I had the first time I painted the body; this was awful. I sanded the whole surface and put it on side. As I’m waiting for the decals from the dash, I reluctantly attempted to paint that fender. If the color coat went well, as usual, I sprayed too much clear coat and got runs. Fortunately, when completely dry, the runs can be sanded and polished. I noticed also that the various steps did not appear again; I assume that after the paint can dry for several weeks/months, the fresh paint has no more influence on the base.

The day before, I attempted to install the dashboard to check if it still can be installed. I had one unforeseen problem: the glove box could not be closed! Why? One screw attaching the box for the relays at the firewall prevented the closing of the glove box! The protruding screw was grinded, excess paint at the back of the glove box was removed; a further attempt to install the dashboard was positive.

To have some braking effect with the emergency brake, I shortened by 3mm the wire emerging from the firewall. When the brake handle is pulled completely, I have some braking at both rear wheels. As I still don’t know if that handle will be reachable once the steering wheel and door are installed, this correction was done uniquely to be able to say “yes, the emergency brake is functioning!”

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Some time ago, I ordered the last decals for the instrument cluster. When the decals are available, I can finish the dash assembly and install it into the car.  I realized that the wiring for the RH door must be finished first because, once the dash is installed, the wiring for that door will be hidden behind the RH kick panel which is integrated into the dash. The question was what is the best routing to choose for the wiring which must be connected with the master window switch from the LH door? At first, I wanted to route it on the floor; finally, I choose the solution to route it right under the dash. This solution prevents a mess on the floor and tunnel with 5 more wires but the door must be pre-installed on the car before I’m assembling the dash! The door will lie near the body, the wiring inserted at the right place and the dash installed. Why can I not install the door first? Because I need the room to attach the various screws. The wires for the lamps must also be routed at the same time.

It was also obvious that the carpet on the RH side and on the tunnel at the front must be installed before the dash. As the LH kick panel is installed separately, I will have the access to the LH wires once the dash is in the car. Once the wiring is finished, the carpet on the LH side will be continued. Are you confused? Me too!

As you can see, this last step is complex; I hope I can connect all the wires properly.

 

I took also a decision: the chrome plates on the “B” pillar will not be used. They are not very nice and they do interfere with the door as I remarked during a test.

1017 carpet installation.JPG

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This is a really great view of the car with the motors for the rear windows just visible where the rear seats will be.  It does put the effort required to work in 1:12 into a wonderful spotlight... all of the amazing detail that looks so natural is made even more unbelievable when you see the size of the motors!!!  I mean those little motors are tiny and the look HUGE sitting in the car.   That gives you a much better perspective of the work required to do the ash tray on the arm rest that looks perfectly normal until you see it is just a *fraction* of the size of the otherwise tiny motor.   The solder joint is bigger than the ash tray!!!  The door latches are smaller as well.   Just amazing work.

 

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Roger, your work is only surpassed by the patience you exhibit. Seeing a difficulty  with the right side door's wire routing now (as if I'd ever have got to here), would have me swearing, packing it all up in a 'forget me' box for the top shelf in the closet. Then, more swearing and banging stuff around for the rest of the day.haha. You, sir are a wonderful reminder for us to keep our eye on the goal. Now, where did I put that rear main bearing shell? I know I saw it last week....................

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Thanks SiliconS and Pat! About searching for parts: you are not alone; sometimes I'm spending a lot of time to search parts I remember I did it (or them)! It was also the case when I restored my cars scale 1:1: some of those parts just disappear like that!

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Thanks Keith!

Recently, I took a decision: I will redo the trunk lid ornament. Those unequal fields are disturbing more and more. Have a look at the picture: the upper distance from horizontal bar to the circle is 3.5mm, the distance under is 4mm! Why did I not see it wile going the part? Some blindness I suppose...

I don't even remember how I did that part, especially the odd shape by the lock ; I only remember that it was difficult to do. Fortunately, I can save the head hiding the lock.

DSC00602.JPG

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