Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. I spent today taking the old tapered roller bearings off the rear axle. I had to split them to get them off and was very careful not to cut into the axle itself. Apparently the last person who performed this task wasn't as careful. After I got the bearings off and cleaned up the axles I discovered some shallow grooves that had obviously been cut into the axle some time in the past. I'm sure the axle is heat treated and I've always heard that cutting into the surface of a heat treated part can substantially weaken it. The deepest groove is perhaps 1/16 of an inch or less. Do I have anything to worry about or are these axles still useable? Thanks for any advice.
  2. Phil, That is really interesting. More detective work - those are obviously factory rivets and your car is a very original specimen. I was really taken aback when I saw my mounts were bolted on. The rivets make more sense - it is really a pain to reach inside the frame through the access holes and tighten the bolts.. Under normal circumstances, I would figure that someone drilled out the rivets on my frame for some reason and then replaced them with bolts. However, the bolts holding on the brackets were all original Dodge Brothers bolts with the logo clearly stamped on the bolt head. Also, if the brackets were ever off the frame, it was a very long time ago based on the dirt and grime that was consistent in this area of the frame. Nothing had been touched or messed with for a period long before we owned the car. There was a slight impression of the bolt heads worn into the surface of the bracket - another indication they had been there a long time. I would have to say that I believe your guess is probably correct - that the early frames may have had the brackets bolted on and then the factory changed the method sometime during the production of the DL. I would love to hear from other DL owners as to how their brackets are mounted.
  3. For me, one of the most entertaining things about working on old cars is the problem solving and detective work necessary during a restoration. Today's foray into uncharted waters was a perfect example. Now that I had the springs and axles on the frame, it was time to start putting all the other various bits and pieces on. The 32 Dodge seems to have more than its share. The only other car I've taken completely down to the frame was a 1929 Plymouth Model U. It had a simple frame with everything riveted together. My DL has more removable items than any car frame I've ever seen. Case in point was today's project - installing the rear motor mount. The transverse cross member has a rubber pad mounted on it as part of the "Floating Power" system. It's removable so you can get to and remove the oil pan. It looked like a simple project - the cross member and two brackets to hold it on. I'd already had the three parts blasted and powder coated and I'd cleaned and painted all the mounting bolts, so I was ready to go. Here you can see the area we're going to address, with a convenient red arrow pointing to the offending part. This was taken during disassembly of the frame several months ago. You can see what was left of the rubber mount on top of the cross member. I try and take as many pictures as I can during disassembly and assembly. Despite having over 1200 photos, I still discover areas that I missed or that don't show up well enough to use. I take detailed notes and draw diagrams of parts as I remove them. I also try to bag and label all parts, but I have been guilty of missing a few - "Heck, I'll remember that!" - much to my later dismay. In the case of the motor mount cross member, things went quickly - maybe a little too quickly. First, I had to determine which direction the flange on the cross member faced. It has a flange on one side and is flat on the other. My photos clearly showed the flange facing toward the front. Problem solved. Then came the two brackets that bolted to the side of the frame and held the cross member on. They were not symmetrical. One went on the the driver's side and one on the passenger's. The question which was which? The powder coating folks had removed my labels and I had no way to tell. I checked my notebook and "Eureka!" - I had cut several marks on the back of the driver's side mount. Second problem solved! I loosely bolted the two brackets in place, slid the cross member into position, and after fumbling with the nuts and bolts, managed to get everything into place and bolted up. Look at that nice new rubber mount on top of the cross member! Job done. Take a quick shower and relax. Then I go back to the computer to add the photos I took during reassembly. But wait. I'm looking at my "before" photo and comparing it with my "after." Something is not right. I dive into Photoshop mode and blow up my "before" photo in the area where the cross member meets the inner frame. What do my doubting eyes perceive? Something - a bracket...a plate...a mount? - sticking out on top of the cross member. This blow-up, with another convenient arrow, shows what I'm taking about. Hmmmmm. I don't remember putting anything like that in place during the reassembly. Of course, I don't remember taking anything off during disassembly either, but that was five month ago. I check my "after" photo. Nothing peeking out in that area, but a nice big mounting hole clearly visible. I rush to the garage to make sure. Nothing there. I check several other old photos. It's hard to tell, but there seems to be something there. Back into Photoshop. Blow up that area. Sure enough, a plate sticking out, big as day. Back to the garage. I had thought I'd laid out all the frame parts long ago. I sort through bags of parts, and there, right at the bottom of the pile, I find them - clearly labeled. how the heck had I missed them? Tomorrow, I'll clean them off and paint them. Then it's just a matter of loosening a few bolts, sliding them into place, and bolting everything down. I shudder to think what would have happened if I hadn't discovered the problem until I after had the engine mounted in the frame. I can just imagine finding that bag right after I had cinched down the last bolt. It would have meant disassembling everything back down to this point. Not a happy prospect. When you take a car down to the frame - and in this case, beyond - make sure you're getting everything back into the right place and in the correct order. I was lucky in this instance and plan to be a bit more diligent in the future when putting Daphne together.
  4. Work continues, but nothing very exciting. I got the rear springs mounted and put the rear axle housing in place. I was unable to find original pattern U-bolts for the rear axle. The originals (several of which broke during disassembly) have a flat top... ...while my new ones are round all the way around. Daphne will be a driver, so no big deal, but I'm trying to keep her as original as possible. Speaking of original, almost all of the bolts on the car have DB stamped on top of the bolt head. It's a very boring and tedious job cleaning them all off, but they are visible on the frame and I like the original look. Primed and ready for a coat of black. They'll get nicked during assembly and I'll just touch them up. I got the steering arms and tie rod on, but it's just temporary as I discovered one of the slotted nuts that holds on the steering arm was split. They are shallow nuts and rather hard to find, but Grainger has them. I plan to get the differential carrier cleaned up and back in the axle housing this weekend.
  5. The meet is put on by the Dodge Brothers Club which recognizes Dodge Brothers vehicles from 1914 to 1938. 1939 and up are Dodges (No Brothers) and not officially part of the club. Obviously any and all are welcome to this one of a kind event. I doubt any of us will be around for the two hundredth anniversary!
  6. I'm pleased to have been chosen to produce and direct the video that will document the upcoming Centennial in Detroit this June. I'm the proud owner of a 1932 DL sedan that, alas, will not be ready for the meet. I'm also a professional film maker and have done shows for Nova on PBS, and many, many documentaries here in the U.S. and around the world. The reason I'm posting here is that we will need your help and support during the meet. If a husband and wife team shows up and shoves a camera in your face and ask about your car, that's the Taylors and we hope you'll have stories to tell and adventures to relate. The more owners we can feature talking about their cars, the better the video will be. We will be going to all the events and we may want to mount a GoPro camera on a few of the cars as they drive around Detroit - the mounts are soft rubber and will not scratch the car. We may want to interview a few of you inside the car while you are driving. We'll try not to be too obtrusive, and feel free to decline if you don't want to appear on camera. For those that do, just tell us the story of your car - where you found it, how you fixed it up or restored it, where it's been, and any other interesting tidbits. After the interview, we will take detailed shots of your car taking care to feature items you may have mentioned. We may pounce at any time, so be prepared! My wife Kathy and I are looking forward to working on the video and meeting Dodge Brothers owners from around the world. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or suggestions. See you in Detroit, Richard and Kathy Taylor
  7. Thank you. It's really enjoyable to see it all coming together after 47 years. My only disappointment is that I will not finish in time to bring her to the 100 year celebration in Detroit where she was born.
  8. After a personal property auction where we unloaded about half of our possessions and a rough bout with an inflamed rotator cuff, I'm finally back at work on Daphne. I must say it's a lot more fun putting cleaned and painted parts back together than taking them apart, cleaning and painting them! With the bare frame back from the powdercoater, I began assembly. I previously painted the springs and installed new bushings. The first job was to install the freshly restored spring damper that fits on the front of the driver's side front spring. An unusual feature of the DL is the two front springs are different in both length and the position of the rolled area that holds the bushing. This is so the damper can fit on just one spring. The damper is in two parts that are bolted together around the end of the spring. Inside each part is a coil spring. Here are the springs inside each half. The two halves bolted around the end of the spring. Here is the spring bolted into place. Two bolts, one in the traditional position and one to hold the spring to the damper. Note the original copper plated bolts which I discovered when I cleaned them off. Dodge used the notorious (as in hard to find) Tryon spring shackles in the late twenties/early thirties. I found some at Hershey this year, not the correct number, but good for some of the parts. Luckily, the shackles on the car were in good shape and only needed cleaning and painting. I'm not sure if they are original, but they were on the car when I bought it in 1965. A NOS shackle fresh out of the box. I wondered if they were installed as bare metal as all the NOS Tryons I've ever seen were not painted, but I found traces of black paint on mine when I cleaned them, so I decided to paint them. Here they are cleaned and ready to go. Here are the frame mounts cleaned up. The springs have the same type of mount. The red is a reflection from the jack stand, not a crummy paint job! Here's the shackle installed. I haven't adjusted the spring tension yet. Once I do, the tabs on the "washer" will be bent around the nut to keep it from turning. Both front springs on. With my shoulder still killing me, I resorted to a jack to lift the restored front axle into place. I know, I'm a wuss, but what can I say? The restored spring bumpers from Now and Then Parts, along with the spring hangers. Notice the two different lengths. The longer ones go to the front to hold on the shock mount plates also seen in the photo. Everything bolted up and ready to go!
  9. Work on the body continues. It's been a slow and sometimes painful process. As I mentioned before, we have decided to go with single stage black for the final finish. Some experimenting with the hood sides yielded very good results. We have what I hope is the last application of primer. One corner of the lower body needs a little work, then everything will be guide-coated and sanded in prep for the color coat.
  10. Ian, Cork is going to stamp the wheels 1 through 6 for future reference. ply33, He's going to repair and true all six wheels. I agree that rotating them for wear is a good idea. Daphne will definitely not be a trailer queen. I plan on driving and enjoying her as much as possible.
  11. I had my crusty wire wheels sandblasted Wednesday and today I drove two hours up to Quincy, Illinois, where Cork Adams of Precision Wire Wheels looked them over. I was quite frankly expecting the worse, as I had several bent rims and a few bent spokes. You can see the original yellow paint peeking through where the old tube straps covered them. Even the sandblaster couldn't get the old rubber off and I had to scrape it clean. By the way, those are Ferrari Borrani wire wheels in the background. Working on high dollar sports cars is Precision's main business, but they gladly took my poverty row Dodge wires in for reconditioning. Cork - really nice guy who knows his business - checked them out for trueness. I was relieved to hear that Cork considered them one of the best sets of antique wheels he's ever gotten in. It turns out that the rim dents will be easy to repair and the almost all of the spokes were tight and true. The bent spokes were straightened on the spot with no problem. Four of the wheels were "almost ready to go" with little or no work and the other two I'll use for the sidemounts. They should be ready next Saturday and then it's off to the powdercoater.
  12. SOLD I love this thing, but we are downsizing and I just don't have the room. This is a huge, 32 inch long plaster casting that was used by Hudson to check paint schemes for the upcoming models. You can display it in its raw white plaster or prime and paint it to your taste. It's a four door on one side and a two door on the other - two for the price of one. Asking $150 plus shipping. It's going to take a big box with plenty of padding. I'm located near St. Louis if you want to come and pick it up. <!-- attachments --> 1932 Dodge DL Sedan
  13. SOLD I love this thing, but we are downsizing and I just don't have the room. This is a huge, 32 inch long plaster casting that was used by Hudson to check paint schemes for the upcoming models. You can display it in its raw white plaster or prime and paint it to your taste. It's a four door on one side and a two door on the other - two for the price of one. Asking $150 plus shipping. It's going to take a big box with plenty of padding. I'm located near St. Louis if you want to come and pick it up. <!-- attachments --> 1932 Dodge DL Sedan
  14. SOLD I love this thing, but we are downsizing and I just don't have the room. This is a huge, 32 inch long plaster casting that was used by Hudson to check paint schemes for the upcoming models. You can display it in its raw white plaster or prime and paint it to your taste. It's a four door on one side and a two door on the other - two for the price of one. Very detailed and just plain cool. Asking $150 plus shipping. It's going to take a big box with plenty of padding. I'm located near St. Louis if you want to come and pick it up.
  15. Up for sale my brother's 1977 Pontiac Firebird Espirt. This is a one owner car that he bought new on May 20, 1977 at the Pontiac dealer in Grand Junction, Colorado. No rust out, nice paint and interior. The following work was done in early 2010: interior seats and headliner replaced to original condition transmission rebuilt (3 speed hydromatic) exhaust system replaced n new battery tray front and rear shocks replaced radiator and heater hoses replaced new wheel lip moldings The car was repainted in the original color in 1989-clear coat. Firebird Esprit; 350 4 barrel (Oldsmobile engine),87,375 miles, VIN 2T87R7N206708, Colorado Title The car is driven every few weeks around town. It has always been garaged and kept in very nice condition. Located in Aurora, Colorado (just outside of Denver.) Buy it and drive it home. Asking $8500, but open to offers. Thanks for looking. Nice, solid, original car looking for a new home. <!-- attachments -->
  16. Up for sale my brother's 1977 Pontiac Firebird Espirt. This is a one owner car that he bought new on May 20, 1977 at the Pontiac dealer in Grand Junction, Colorado. No rust out, nice paint and interior. The following work was done in early 2010: interior seats and headliner replaced to original condition transmission rebuilt (3 speed hydromatic) exhaust system replaced n new battery tray front and rear shocks replaced radiator and heater hoses replaced new wheel lip moldings The car was repainted in the original color in 1989-clear coat. Firebird Esprit; 350 4 barrel (Oldsmobile engine),87,375 miles, VIN 2T87R7N206708, Colorado Title The car is driven every few weeks around town. It has always been garaged and kept in very nice condition. Located in Aurora, Colorado (just outside of Denver.) Buy it and drive it home. Asking $8500, but open to offers. Thanks for looking. Nice, solid, original car looking for a new home.
  17. The saga of the body continues. After waiting for warm weather so the body could be sanded and buffed' we went over the finish and Crin, the painter' wasn't satisfied. So, back to basics, paint sanded down, certain small areas addressed, and primer currently covering the problem areas. Tomorrow those areas will be sanded, then a full coat of primer will go back on. Crin offered to do this on his own, so I certainly can't complain. Some of the progress: After much discussion, we have decided to shoot single stage black rather than base coat/clear coat. After a lot of research and no small amount of soul-searching, I've decided the single stage will give a more "original" look to the final paint job. Apparently the Dodge Brothers Club agrees as they don't allow clear coat paint jobs (I think this is correct, let me know if I'm mistaken). I took a look at two paint jobs at a local body shop, both black, one single stage and one cleared. I much preferred the single stage. The clear had somewhat of a dipped in plastic look that screamed modern day hot rod. It was nice and shiny, but lacked the "character" I believe is necessary on an old original car. I think single stage in solid, non-metallic colors looks very nice and should be easier to repair when it comes to minor road chips and such. Let the disagreements begin!
  18. Dennis and Shannon, Your restoration looks great. I'm restoring a 1932 Dodge Brothers DL and reading of your successes and problems certainly hits home - been there, done that. I was wondering where you got the paint you used on the transmission. The color looks very much like the traces of paint I have found on my power-train parts. Was it a special mix you had made up or a good old spray can job? Either way, it looks terrific. (I'm sure you're aware of the missing bolt on the top transmission to bell-housing mounting hole.) I can only hope mine ends up looking that good. RT
  19. Based on some research and the visual evidence I'd say the car (they apparently had two) is a Duesenburg II, one of the replicas they made in the 1980s. Check out the way the front windshield fits to the body and the size of the steering wheel.
  20. Some progress. The front axle is finished, new kingpins installed, fresh paint. Front springs got a second coat of black and are ready to go. Cleaned and painted the fittings that hold the spring to the axle but forgot to take a picture. Things are coming along slowly but surely.
  21. I've been staring at my front axle, trying to figure out how to get the old kingpins out. I had already gotten the small tapered pins that hold the kingpins in place out. I had to drill out their centers before I could get them loose enough to remove. I think the heat and vibration from the drill loosened them up enough that I could drive them out. The kingpins, however, wouldn't budge. I went on the web and found lots of information - most of it useless. The general consensus was to heat up the spindle and then drive out the kingpin with a large drift and the biggest hammer you could find. This didn't sound like a very sensible or safe way to do the job. Since I was going to go to Columbia, Missouri to videotape a basketball playoff game, I called Ed Thomas, the gentleman who did all the bodywork on Daphne, and asked him if he could help me out. Ed is more than just a body guy, he seems to have an innate knowledge of all things automobile, and he said, "Sure, I have all the tools you'll need to get everything taken care of." Yesterday, I made the two and a half hour drive and pulled into Ed's at around 10:30 AM. The first order of business was to get the old kingpins out. No heat was applied, and although we did use a type of a hammer, it didn't involve swinging a 20 pound sledge and possibly removing fingers or pieces of hands in the process. Ed pulled out his trusty, twenty-year-old Snap-On impact wrench. We set the axle on the edge of his solid metal workbench and he began hammering down on the top of the kingpin with the impact driver. Within a few seconds the pin began to move and it was free in about half a minute. I didn't get a shot of the process because I was holding the axle. In any case, it worked like a charm. The second kingpin came out much easier than the first and we discovered that it had gotten a full dose of grease over the years. We went back and examined the stubborn pin and noticed a great deal of rust at the bottom bushing and very little grease. This seemed odd as the car had been well lubricated over it's lifetime. The rust had been holding the pin in rather tenaciously. More on that later. Now we drove out the bushings with the correct stepped tool Ed had handy for the job. This is the type of tool most of us simply do not have. They aren't cheap, you need one for each size bushing you want to drive out, and you'll probably use the tool once or twice in your lifetime if you're a hobbyist. As usual, with the right tool, the bushings came out with no problem. We cleaned up the end of the axle and pumped some fresh grease into the four fittings to clear out any old, dried out grease from the openings. As Ed said, "You don't want any of that stuff getting on your new bushings and kingpins." That's when we solved the mystery of the rusted, stubborn kingpin. The grease fitting was defective on the lower bushing. We tried to pump grease through it but nothing came out the other end. Over the years, when the car was lubricated, the mechanic must have assumed grease was going into the bushing, when it was actually just oozing out around the fitting. That one bushing hadn't had a shot of grease in a long, long time. The good fitting is on the right and the bad on the left. Now it was time to put the new bushings in. I bought a NOS kingpin set at Hershey and I had all the parts ready for the restoration. Ed explained that the surfaces of the axle and spindle have to be perfectly flat and burr-free. If they aren't, any shims used will be torn up by the rough surfaces. We carefully filed everything smooth and flat. At this point, I figured that Ed would drive the new bushings in with the same tool he used to drive out the old. Au Contraire! No banging on the new bushings! He installed them using this handy little apparatus that allowed the bushings to be slowly pulled into place and for the lube holes to be correctly lined up. Just tighten down the bolts and the bushing slides into place. With the bushings in place, we cleaned up the spindle in the blasting cabinet. There was a lot of rust and corrosion and the kingpin would not slip through the bore of the spindle. A quick cleanup and all was ready. Now came the hard part - reaming the bushings. They are manufactured slightly over-sized so that the interior bore can be reamed to the correct diameter. This process also allows for both bushings to be reamed to perfect alignment so the kingpin can just drop through both bushings without any binding. Using this reamer, with and extension and a pilot fitting to align it with the other bushings, we slowly reamed the bushings to an exact fit. The reamer expands and we adjusted the cutting diameter with each pass. It took about seven or eight passes to get things right on the nose. In the shot below you can see Ed holding the pilot bushing in his left hand as he inserts the reamer into the top bushing. Now the kingpins fit perfectly. I can push the pin in with slight finger pressure and the spindle moves easily and smoothly. The bearing is installed with the rotating surface down against the spindle and at the top of the spindle. I shot the basketball game (my team won and are going to the state championship game) and I came home, the axle ready for paint and final assembly.