Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. On another thread in this forum they are discussing a Dodge Brothers commercial currently running - the one with the two Dodge brothers quitting working for Ford and going out on their own to produce the Dodge Brothers automobile. This brought back memories of one of "the" stories in my family's history. My great-grandfather, Charles Carolin, was a self-made man who came to Detroit from Windsor, Canada in the late nineteenth century. He became a prominent and very successful businessman in the then burgeoning Motor City, and owned one of the largest foundry and metal working plants in the city. He's the rather imposing gentleman in the center of this family portrait taken around 1908. That's my grandmother in the lower left, his favorite whom he always called Baby. Charles was a rich, stubborn, no nonsense guy. I'm sure he'd be an avid watcher of Bill O'Reilly if he was alive today. He was most upset when local ordinances forced him to give up his horses, and he absolutely refused to buy one of the newfangled automobiles, preferring to walk to work. One day a gentleman arrived at the foundry with a proposition: if my great-grandfather would mass produce certain parts for his new enterprise, he would offer Charles ten percent of his company. My great-grandfather viewed this offer with much skepticism - this skinny entrepreneur was making his third or forth try at starting a (gasp) automobile company; he had no money, thus the ten percent offer; his credit was not just bad - it was terrible, and it's said that Charles Carolin did not particularly care for the looks of this eager young man. Charles turned down the offer - cash only was the only way he would deal. Thus the young man, whom I'm sure you've guessed by now was Henry Ford, eventually went to the Dodge Brothers for his parts and my great-grandfather gave up what would have been a massive family fortune. True story, but since the Dodge brothers designed many of Ford's parts and loaned him money to get things rolling, I doubt that any relationship between Charles and Henry would have been productive. In fact, I believe it would have led to another failure for Ford and much satisfaction for Charles Carolin. Later, Charles - who was also a ardent pacifist - refused to manufacture munitions for the government during World War One. There went another couple of hundred-millions. It's the reason I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to afford the chrome plating on Daphne rather than bidding on a Duesenberg at the latest Scottsdale auction. Thanks Grandpa Carolin!
  2. The sixties - I lost a lot of perfectly good brain cells during that decade!
  3. I realized today that it was fifty years ago that I first bought Daphne. Now I'm more determined than ever to get her on the road this year as an anniversary present to myself. Here she is on the front lawn of the Delt House in 1965. For some reason I had temporarily taken the front bumper off - I have no recollection why.
  4. Pictures like this keep me moving ahead on the restoration. Photos previous owner (and Dodge Brothers Club Magazine Editor) Phil Kennedy sent me awhile ago. This is how I remember her - minus the sealed beams and the missing sidemounted spare.
  5. Thanks for the compliments everybody. Part Three coming soon.
  6. I'm having three parts made for my 32 DL Sedan - The battery box, the rear tailpipe hanger (the one with the H-shaped rubber connector) and the tool box (the V-shaped metal box that sits inside the X-member of the frame.) All three are being made to the exact specifications of the original parts. If anyone is interested in these parts, I can have one made for you. The more my guy makes, the cheaper the part will be. As he says, the first one is the expensive one as he has to make patterns and figure out how to manufacture the part. If anyone is interested, let me know. Once I have a number, we can figure out the final price. He is also making me a set of running boards, so if you need a set, let me know. All these parts seem to be very prone to rusting, with the exception of the exhaust hanger which simply seems to disappear. I know the 32 is kind of a rare year, but some of you out there may need these parts. Just PM me if I can help. RT
  7. One small correction - on page two I state that "all four shocks are the same." This is not technically correct. All four shocks are the same internally, but there is a left and a right casting for the main body of the shock. They are not interchangeable from side to side. I've revised the page to indicate this. And, yes, Scotts_DG8, there will be a part two soon.
  8. AACA friendly or not, it looks good, Binger. I discovered that once I had on a coat of primer, the surface of the shocks looks pretty good. As you said, they retain the "cast" look and turned out much smoother than I expected. I notice your shocks have that screw or relief valve bolt on the back of the shock. Mine don't have that feature, which surprises me as the Dodge was a pricier car than the Chevy. Anyway, I have four new ones from the rebuild kit if you need them, just to say thanks for directing me to the Filling Station.
  9. These old restorations with the brown fenders and tan body are really dated. I can remember when that was the hot combo, but these days it's like looking at a pair of flowered bell bottoms .
  10. The rebuild kit from The Filling Station arrived. The kit does all four shocks. It looks like everything will fit my shocks. The seals are rubber impregnated cork. They are nicely cut and fit the shaft tightly. The kit also comes with cork gaskets for the end covers... ...and new thick-headed screws for the covers. They also carry new shock links that match the size on my front shocks. The original is on top in the photo below. I ordered two as the holes on my originals are oblong from use. Finally, the kit comes with four rubber mounts for the shock arms, plus the pins and cotter pins. The rubber is nicely molded and has a brass insert inside. I was going to attempt to reproduce these, but this solves the problem. I now have the front shocks disassembled, cleaned and ready for painting. Which brings me to a question. I could find no trace of paint on the shocks when I cleaned them. I'm going to paint them black, but I wonder if they were left in bare metal when originally installed on the car. They are quite pitted, more than the frame, but they are cast iron and may have rusted faster. I have decided to paint them, pits and all. I know I could spend the time filling everything with body filler and high build primer, but I really want to drive this car before I take the big dirt nap. so it's going to be semi-gloss black, pits and all.
  11. I ordered a rebuild kit from The Filling Station after a suggestion from Binger, a fellow forum member who replied in the General Discussion section. The kit does all four shocks. I talked to them over the phone and they graciously measured the seals and other items for me. It looks like everything will fit my shocks. The seals are rubber impregnated cork. They are nicely cut and fit the shaft tightly. The kit also comes with cork gaskets for the end covers... ...and new, correct thick-headed screws for the covers. They also carry new shock links that match the size on my front shocks. The original is on top in the photo below. I ordered two as the holes on my originals are oblong from use. Finally, the kit comes with four rubber mounts for the shock arms, plus the pins and cotter pins. The rubber is nicely molded and has a brass insert inside. I was going to attempt to reproduce these, but this solves the problem. I now have the front shocks disassembled, cleaned and ready for painting. Which brings me to a question. I could find no trace of paint on the shocks when I cleaned them. I'm going to paint them black, but I wonder if they were left in bare metal when originally installed on the car. They are quite pitted, more than the frame, but they are cast iron and may have rusted faster. I have decided to paint them, pits and all. I know I could spend the time filling everything with body filler and high build primer, but I really want to drive this car before I take the big dirt nap. so it's going to be semi-gloss black, pits and all. I also ordered four Speedi-Sleeves for the worn shafts. If all goes well, looks like this will solve my shock rebuilding project.
  12. The bargain thing was my lame attempt at a joke. I just bought a nice set of quality brake hoses for my 32 Dodge at a good price. What I was really complaining about is the sudden inability to refine my search on EBay Motors. It allows you - or USED to allow you - to type in the range of years you wanted to view. Now, when I do that, it won't refine the search and I get every car for sale, not just the old ones I've always enjoyed looking at. I've used this feature for years and it suddenly stopped working last nigh and remains broken this morning. I've tried every advanced search option available and nothing works.
  13. Is it just me or has the search function in EBay Motors gone off the rails? I always have it set up to view cars from 1900 to 1942, but tonight it suddenly gives me 62000 sales of modern cars no matter what I type into the search function. Just another reason to stop looking for "bargains" I guess.
  14. I ordered a rebuild kit from The Filling Station. It does all four shocks. I talked to them over the phone and they graciously measured the seals and other items for me. It looks like everything will fit my shocks. The kit also comes with rubber mounts for the shock levers. They also carry new shock links that match the size on my front shocks and I ordered two as the holes on my originals are oblong from use. I also ordered four Speedi-Sleeves for the worn shafts. If all goes well, looks like this will solve my shock rebuilding project.
  15. Looks like those take a one inch shaft - mine is .875.
  16. Thanks Binger, from what I can see they might work. From my limited research, the 1930-1932 Chevy used the 1200 Series shocks, while my Dodge uses the 1500 Series. From pictures, they look identical, but it's hard to tell if they are the same or not. I'll call The Filling Station tomorrow and see what they say. Thanks for the lead.
  17. Success! I also posted this on the Dodge Brothers Forum and got help from Phil Kennedy, Spinneyhill and Bill Engle. I used Bill's method of picking out the seal and then using heat and an inner bearing race puller to get the cap off. The only downsize is you have to destroy the existing seal to get the cap off, so I don't really know what the original looked like. It was rubber and some sort of felt-like material, but there wasn't enough left to determine the actual construction. I can see the problem with the modern 8702 seal, as recommended by Bill Engle - its outer metal construction makes it a bit too thick to fit inside the dome cover. If you look at the area on the shock casting where the seal used to fit, you can see that it is dished, almost like the original seal was designed to be thicker in the center and taper off to a thinner cross-section at the edges. I'm going down to my local bearing shop soon to see if I can find something that would work a little better than the 8702.
  18. Success! I got the little sucker off thanks to Phil, Spinneyhill and Bill Engle. I used Bill's method of picking out the seal and then using heat and a puller to get the cap off. The only downsize is you have to destroy the existing seal to get the cap off, so I don't really know what the original looked like. It was rubber and some sort of felt-like material, but there wasn't enough left to determine the actual construction. I can see the problem with the modern 8702 seal - its outer metal construction makes it a bit too thick to fit inside the dome cover. If you look at the area on the shock casting where the seal used to fit, you can see that it is dished, almost like the original seal was designed to be thicker in the center and taper off to a thinner cross-section at the edges. I'm going down to my local bearing shop tomorrow to see if I can find something that would work a little better than the 8702.
  19. The 32 Dodge DL uses an entirely different setup. It looks like this: It uses springs rather than rubber.
  20. I made some spring bumpers for a 29 Plymouth I restored years ago and it worked pretty well. They still looked new 30 years later. They make a primer that bonds the rubber to metal and I had to make a rather intricate mold to get everything to work, but it can be done. I'm not sure how it would work in applications where a lot of stress is involved, like the "Floating Power" motor mounts on my 32 dodge DL. Tom Hanniford of Then and Now Auto remanufactured mine and did an excellent job. He vulcanizes the rubber to the metal parts under high heat and pressure. I would have spent almost as much buying the rubber compounds as he charged me for the work. For small stuff - firewall grommets, spring bumpers, it works fine.
  21. Phil and Spinneyhill, This really helps. I have the Skinned Knuckles article -the actual magazine copies - but they say to cut the "metal ring" to remove the seal, which appears to be a different setup than on mine. It looks like Bill Engle's solution is the way to go, although I wonder if a less thick seal would work and alleviate the need to mill the shock housing. As I said before, my machinist abilities are not all that great.
  22. Thanks, Ian. I couldn't find a website for them, just an address and phone number. I would prefer to email them if possible, as I can send pix and other information. Anyone have an email address for them?
  23. Thanks Ron, I, too, Googled and found them. They look the same, but their measurements are confusing. The outside diameter on my covers is 1.625. In their catalog they first give an outside diameter of 1.750, then give a outside diameter (at the bottom) of 1.625, so I'm totally confused. I sent them an email and we'll see where that goes. 25 bucks each is a lot better than the $165 to $250 each to rebuild the shock. I spent some time wrapping the cover with a rubber sheet and trying to remove it with a big pair of pliers, but it wouldn't budge. I'm afraid if I went with metal on metal with the pliers, it would tear up the cover and ruin it. I have a really bad feeling that the only way to get these off is to cut them and I really hesitate to do that before I get a definite source for new covers. As a last resort, I guess I could turn some on my lathe, but that is truly a last resort, as my machining skills are negligible at best!