Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. I was going through some of my late father's stuff the other day and discovered a box of old tools. I suspect some of these are from the days of his youth when he and his brothers owned a 23 Model T touring. The Taylor Boys - Tom, Dick (my dad) and Harry, along with older brother Don and my mother's brother Bill, once drove that old Ford around the boarders of Michigan - from Detroit, across the southern boarder, around the Lakes, the UP and back down to Detroit. That would have been around 1934, when my dad was 14, and he did much of the driving! What a summer that must have been. He said they often had to stop and do odd jobs to make some money for gas and that they usually slept under the stars unless some kindly folk offered the use of their barn. So, are some of these tools Ford, or am I dreaming (I'm not a Ford guy)? This main batch is Stamped FAIRMOUNT CLEVE. Next up are two wrenches that I'm sure are not Ford - They are stamped KING DICK (I kid you not) and the sizes are stamped 3/4 AIF or maybe 3/4 A/F. The last batch is an odd lot, the large one stamped Dunlap one one side and Forged In The USA on the other. The other two say Made In The USA. There were also old pliers, several small tire irons, an old air pump and a bead breaker. Maybe I'll make up a faux tool kit for my 32 Dodge.
  2. The engine paint on my 32 DL was a gray-green also. There was a nice sample on the top of the bellhousing that escaped the elements and the sun. It looks close to your color, maybe not quite as green, but it's hard to tell from photographs as the color temperature of the light can cause the photo to be off-color. Did you have your engine paint mixed, or was it from a rattle can? Either way, it looks great. I'm just getting ready to clean and paint my engine and I hope it turns out half as good!
  3. I'd say with over 11 thousand views lots of us are following your thread, Barry. I know I am and learn something new every time. Sometimes I hesitate to respond because simply saying "thanks" over and over again seems a bit lame. I find this and your other assembly threads both fascinating and informative, even if my project is a lowly 32 Dodge, I get lots of useful information. RT
  4. 16 thousand. Of course, I see these "sold" cars come back up for auction again very often, so who knows for sure.
  5. For those in the dark about 32bizcoupe's post above, I have managed to misplace the shock plates off my DL. how the heck I could lose something that big and heavy is beyond me, but I've been searching for the last week, laying out all the frame parts that still need to be restored, and they have not shown up. Since they are flat 11 gauge steel they will be easy to make and 32bizcoupe kindly provided a photo and dimensions after I sent him a PM. I'm sure as soon as I finish making them, the originals will turn up - as they always seem to in situations like this. This all coincided with an embarrassing incident with my rebuilt engine. With the weather finally warming up, I got ready to clean the block and prep it for paint. I figured I'd give it a spin or two with the hand crank to make sure nothing had happened to my fresh engine over the winter. I found it was locked solid. Naturally panic ensued. Nothing would make that newly turned crank move. Ready to march into the house and have a heated discussion with my rebuilder over the phone, I calmed down enough to check out things one more time. That was when I noticed the unsecured bolts that hold on the flywheel had moved when I rolled the engine into the sunshine on my hand-built cart. They'd moved just enough to jam against a ridge on the block. I popped the bolts back into place and she turned over just fine. Auto restoration by yours truly, the amateur. Ain't it grand!
  6. Although Burnbaum and Roberts list cylinders for 32 Dodges, when you call them it turns out they only have the correct cylinder for the rear brakes. The front cylinders are different - slightly larger and with a different bolt pattern. I don't know about the 33 model, it may not be the same. Why they list them the way they do mystifies me, why not just list what they have correctly?
  7. I used to be about two hours away from my sheetmetal/body guy, Ed Thomas in Columbia, Missouri. Since my wife and I retired and moved, we are now about 3-1/2 hours away. Ed kindly sent me pictures of our current project - a new battery box, new tailpipe bracket and new tool box. He is working on my new running boards today, and I hope to have a picture of those soon. Ed had patterns for the battery box and tool box, there was still enough left of the old ones to see how they were made. Here is a shot of two new battery boxes, two new tailpipe hangers, the new tool box and the remains of the old one behind it. Ed explained how he made the bottom of the battery box: The battery box form works like sandwich with the sheet of metal in between the two pieces of wood. The lower has a 1 3/8 slot milled to receive the metal downward. The upper one has a 3/4 inch slot center-lined with the lower one so that the upper piece of 3/4 inch tooling with the proper radius for the center of the X bead, can be fed down by the Pullmax to form the X in the bottom of the battery box. This stuff is way beyond my pay grade, but, thanks to Ed, Daphne will look about as original as I can make her.
  8. I'm having to give up on the carb. Heating up the casting worked but also revealed several rust holes in the bottom of the float bowl once i cleaned everything up. Another hole had opened up in the side of the float bowl. Also, two of the threaded holes in the top casting had been repaired with Heli-coils sometime in the past before Phil and I owned the car and they stripped right out when I removed the screws. I also discovered that this is the wrong carb for the car, it's actual application is for a early forties Chevy or GMC C.E.O. truck. It always worked fine back in the sixties when I was driving her, but it is incorrect for the car. Now it will just serve as a parts source. I have located the correct carb for the car and bought it. Since I needed to buy close to two hundred dollars in parts to try and fix the old one, I guess the three hundred buck price tag was acceptable. Pardon me while I cry myself to sleep.
  9. Jon's advice on removing the Step -up Valve may prevent future carb rebuilders from making the mistake I did. Someone had already torn up the top of the valve and my attempts to turn it with a large blade screwdriver really messed the top of the valve up. Here is the valve before I really tore it up. It simply wouldn't come out, so my advice is - if you get to this part and it won't turn, do not force it. Following Jon's advice, I put the lower casting in the oven at 500 degrees for about half an hour. Then I removed it and played a MAP torch over the bottom of the casting in the area where the valve was located for a few minutes and then let the casting cool down naturally until it reached room temperature. Do not quench the casting.. Jon told me that I would need patience, and he was right. The first attempt did nothing and the valve still would not turn. So, I went through the process again. This time the valve turned easily. It might even take three tries on some castings, but it will work. Patience -something I have very little of. Unfortunately, in my case, I buggered up the valve pretty badly. Aside from tearing up the top, my attempt at turning the valve with a pair of needle-nose vice grips scarred the sides of the valve pretty badly. The valve comes apart with the bottom cap screwing off the valve to expose the spring and a tiny ball bearing which is not in the photos because it kept rolling away. Jon says the spring will be damaged by the heat, so don't reuse it. So, I'm calling Jon tomorrow to order a complete rebuild kit and the top half of the valve - which is going to set me back in the range of $115. So don't make the mistake I did - go gently and use the heating method, not brute force, and save yourself a bundle.
  10. Had a long and informative talk with Jon (carbking) this afternoon. I'll let you know what happens with this and other problems in future posts.
  11. I've watched Fantomworks a few times, and at least they have the guts to tell what they charged customers for the work they did. But the prices are astronomical for the work done. They did a 41 Buick and many of the closeup shots of the "restored" car showed rust and pitting on the interior parts. In another show they did a little bubble car for some poor woman who shelled out 36,000 bucks just for the restoration work (parts not included) and closeups of the "restored" car showed a dirty and pitted dash and steering column, a rusty ignition switch and a taillight with the worst chrome job I've ever seen held on by incorrect screws, and other shoddy work. Who in their right mind would advertise such substandard work on national television?
  12. Carbking no longer rebuilds, he now manufactures and sells quality rebuilding kits. I will take him up on his offer and call him Monday afternoon to see if there is a solution to this problem.
  13. It might work, but it's a bit tight in there. I'll ask carbking when I call him on Monday. Maybe he has a replacement part.
  14. Well, the saga continues. With a bit of patience and some penetrating oil, I got the plunger in the accelerator out. The bore was full of rust and varnish and that was holding it in. Once that was out, I removed the float and went to work on the three items pictured below - I'm using these charts to ID parts... http://www.oldcarmanualproject.com/manuals/Carbs/Carter/BB-updraft/index.htm So I guess these three are the Step-up Valve Assembly, the Pump Valve Assembly and the Check Valve Assembly. Naturally, I ran into another problem. As you can see, the assembly to the right (Check Valve?) already had some damage to the top. As it always seems to go, the first two assemblies came out with no problem - just a bit of effort with a large screwdriver and they broke free. Ahhh...but why is it always the last one that's such a bugger? It stuck fast, and all I did, despite using a wide blade screwdriver and trying to be careful, was to tear up the top even more. So, what's next? This stuff seems delicate, so I don't think blasting a lot of heat in there is a good idea. I might be able to get a pair of vise-grips on it, but that's really going to tear up the part and I'm not sure if a new one of these is readily available down at the local NAPA. As always, suggestions are always welcome. I don't want to tear the poor thing up any more that I already have! Once I solve this, I'm sure the next catastrophe is right around the corner.
  15. I also posted this in the Dodge Brothers Forum and got a quick response from carbking, so all is well and the two castings are now separated. I'm going to continue this in the Dodge Forum for those who are interested.
  16. Thank you keiser31 and carbking - the pin is out and the castings are separated. Jon, I'll call you Monday, thanks for the offer. You rebuilt a carb for my 29 Plymouth back in the seventies and it's still going strong. RT
  17. Working on my 32 DL and I'm attempting to rebuild my B and B Model 517S updraft carb and have run into a problem right from the get go. I have the three screws that hold the top casting to the lower casting. But when I try to separate them, the accelerator pump hangs up and won't come free. The brass piston is free and will move in the bore, but whatever is attached to the rod that passes through the brass piston and down into the bore seems fixed solid. I don't want to damage anything trying to force it out, In the picture below you can see the two castings separated, the brass piston and the rod that passes down into the bore. The rod will move down, but at a certain point it will not move up. Is there something attached to the rod that needs to be released? This is my first attempt at an updraft with a mechanical accelerator pump, so please excuse my ignorance.
  18. I'm attempting to rebuild my B and B Model 517S updraft carb and have run into a problem right from the get go. I have the three screws that hold the top casting to the lower casting. But when I try to separate them, the accelerator pump hangs up and won't come free. The brass piston is free and will move in the bore, but whatever is attached to the rod that passes through the brass piston and down into the bore seems fixed solid. I don't want to damage anything trying to force it out, In the picture below you can see the two castings separated, the brass piston and the rod that passes down into the bore. The rod will move down, but at a certain point it will not move up. Is there something attached to the rod that needs to be released? This is my first attempt at an updraft with a mechanical accelerator pump, so please excuse my ignorance.
  19. I looked through every source book I have. A company named Neff-Moon made toys with wheels like yours, but there is no evidence they ever made a fire engine. Turner did make some toys with very similar wheels, but as I said, the radiator isn't standard Turner fare. I have found over the years there are some toys that turned out to be very limited runs and just don't show up on the radar when you're trying to figure out who made them. I have a very nice English toy boat with a very unusual motor, and I know I once saw an ad for that very boat for sale on EBay (long before i obtained the boat), but I've never been able to find it again. It's stuff like this that drives you nuts! It still looks more like a Turner than anything else I've been able to find. Kingsbury made slightly smaller toys with white rubber tires, so I don't think it's a Kingsbury.
  20. The slots in the side made me think of Schieble, but the wheels and radiator are wrong. The front looks Turner, but this has me stumped - never seen one quite like it.
  21. We sent out the video of the meet I made for the club to all attendees some time ago - I hope everyone got theirs. I believe the Dodge Brothers Club still has some for sale if you missed the event. Some really nice "traveling" shots of the cars if I do say so myself, lots of interviews with car owners and coverage of each day's events.. My wife and I very much enjoyed meeting everyone and working on the video up in Detroit.
  22. This commercial brought back memories of one of "the" stories in my family's history. I also posted this on my restoration thread. My great-grandfather, Charles Carolin, was a self-made man who came to Detroit from Windsor, Canada in the late nineteenth century. He became a prominent and very successful businessman in the then burgeoning Motor City, and owned one of the largest foundry and metal working plants in the city. He's the rather imposing gentleman in the center of this family portrait taken around 1908. That's my grandmother in the lower left, his favorite whom he always called Baby. Charles was a rich, stubborn, no nonsense guy. I'm sure he'd be an avid watcher of Bill O'Reilly if he was alive today. He was most upset when local ordinances forced him to give up his horses, and he absolutely refused to buy one of the newfangled automobiles, preferring to walk to work. One day a gentleman arrived at the foundry with a proposition: if my great-grandfather would mass produce certain parts for his new enterprise, he would offer Charles ten percent of his company. My great-grandfather viewed this offer with much skepticism - this skinny entrepreneur was making his third or forth try at starting a (gasp) automobile company; he had no money, thus the ten percent offer; his credit was not just bad - it was terrible, and it's said that Charles Carolin did not particularly care for the looks of this eager young man. Charles turned down the offer - cash only was the only way he would deal. Thus the young man, whom I'm sure you've guessed by now was Henry Ford, eventually went to the Dodge Brothers for his parts and my great-grandfather gave up what would have been a massive family fortune. True story, but since the Dodge brothers designed many of Ford's parts and loaned him money to get things rolling, I doubt that any relationship between Charles and Henry would have been productive. In fact, I believe it would have led to another failure for Ford and much satisfaction for Charles Carolin. Later, Charles - who was also a ardent pacifist - refused to manufacture munitions for the government during World War One. There went another couple of hundred-millions. It's the reason I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to afford the chrome plating on my 32 DL rather than bidding on a Duesenberg at the latest Scottsdale auction. Thanks Grandpa Carolin! 1932 Dodge DL Sedan Edit Post Reply Reply With Quote