scott12180

1932 Packard 902 5-passenger (Victoria) Coupe

Recommended Posts

Matt and all of you youngsters  : Greg is about 12 years older than Matt. I am 14 years older than Greg. It is impossible to REALLY understand what old age is like until you get there. Risk taking and elective major life changes become less attractive and less advisable as you approach old age. Greg : Happy upcoming Big Six-Oh !!!!! Do not do or plan anything you think you  would not want to start if you were 75. You will be there MUCH sooner than you can possibly think. And there is so much unpredictability along the way that there becomes a time to avoid most possible risks. I got in a bad accident in my late 60s. My doctors say, and I agree that I am physically an 89 year old in almost all ways. My mother took a strongly prohibited risk with my money behind my back and cost me the fruit of a very successful 35 year, average 70 hour work week life. Lost me maybe 30+ Duesenbergs (what is their average price these days ? - she had said she would buy me one if I graduated from college about 55 years ago, popcorn money compared to today - I chose the hardest working most likely path to big bucks, never got the D'berg), and any chance of a relaxed, comfortable old age. FINISH YOUR PROJECTS NOW GREG, and realize that even with an utterly devastated life, I am still able to be happy from time to time thanks to modern medicine and modern anti-depressants. Compared to so many people in the world even in our lands of plenty, and to some brave courageous members of this forum who are dealing with situations vastly more difficult than my own, I DON'T HAVE A CARE IN THE WORLD !!!!

 

Matt,you are about my son's age. Remember, and pay more attention to what I say than he does !!!!!!!        -  Cadillac Carl  

 

                           I HOPE THIS HELPS SOMEONE WHO READS IT 

 

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt, I have called you "The Joseph Conrad of automotive descriptive writers", or something similar to that. Therefore, appreciation particularly from you makes me feel 65 again !!!!!! THANK YOU !!!!!!!!!!!!!    -  Cadillac Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very wise words Carl. And much encouragement!

And you are correct , a relocation would almost certainly benefit a bit on the financial side however it would mean leaving behind friends and family and be a very involved undertaking logistically . And due to the housing boom / crisis almost anywhere in Western Canada has much higher prices than you would expect. As tens of thousands of newcomers and investors bought Vancouver area properties, the sellers spread eastward with very full bank accounts from the windfall prices they realised on their sold Vancouver homes [often multiple millions}. The effect is that I would have to spend a healthy percentage of what I would receive for my rather modest house in the far suburbs of Vancouver for something similar in the comparative boonies. And once you leave the Vancouver area the climate changes rapidly. They don't call Canada the frozen North for nothing. plus 50 miles out of Vancouver in any direction puts you either in a foreign country, the Pacific Ocean or In the very rugged Coast mountain range.   Heating and transportation costs would see a big jump up so overall the savings would probably be quite a bit lower than one would normally expect.

  Also my Wife is quite happy here, she has a reasonably decent income and does not suffer from an old car addiction so she wants for little. In fact the one thing that would make her happier is if I just gave up on old cars and took up something like hiking or photography.

  But I do press on with projects. I am a hands on person and get a great deal of satisfaction re- creating parts from scratch. That has made getting my shop built a big priority. For the last 30 years I have had access to very nice shipboard workshops . I was able to whittle away on smaller jobs on the Night Shifts once all the work for the night was complete. Now I no longer have access to that so a proper shop as opposed to the motley collection of leaky sheds I now have is job #1.

 

Greg

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I look deep in my heart,  no car has ever made me as happy as my 69 GTO Convertible that I paid 320 dollars for at the age of 16.  It sat under a tarp in the driveway for 2 years while my dad and I welded it back together again.   Byard Libby did the engine and paint and still does all the work on my cars.   When that car was finished I would wash it 4 or 5 times a week.   No car experience (and I've had a few good ones, see below) has ever equaled pulling in to the Drive In with my exceptionally attractive girlfriend and that car making the ground shake as I left it in first the whole time.

 

You can look at everything as glass half full or glass half empty.   Take realistic look at what you can afford.   I honestly see cars for 10k and that I find very interesting.   You can always find something you can't afford,  no matter how much money you have.

d800-16_46310a2ps_brad.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gorgeous car!  I leave it to others as to whether the price is fair.  I'm not a Packard guy so question:  what are the chrome-cover thingies on the fenders in front of the cowl?  Tool boxes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 3:11 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Despite what people seem to think about me, I've pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I'll never own a Duesenberg, much as I desperately want one. I'll never own a 1934 Packard Twelve of any kind, either. But that doesn't stop me from having fun in the cars that I can afford, and even though the relative prices might be vastly different, I don't really know if a Duesenberg would make me 50 times happier than my 1929 Cadillac does today. I'm not saying I wouldn't be willing to find out, but I'm quite content with what I have despite the dream of having more.

 

To me, happiness isn't in the value of something, it's what that thing adds to your life. If you can afford more expensive things and those things make you happy, great! I'm not going to begrudge those people who can afford those things just because I can't. Find your own happiness and you may very well discover that it is completely unrelated to the value of the thing in question.

Well said Mat and I do have more fun in my T touring's than my I do in my 30 Cadillac closed car. My dream is not a Duesenberg but a 1911 T Torpedo or a Thomas Flyer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, CHuDWah said:

Gorgeous car!  I leave it to others as to whether the price is fair.  I'm not a Packard guy so question:  what are the chrome-cover thingies on the fenders in front of the cowl?  Tool boxes?

Suspect one is battery also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/15/2018 at 3:43 PM, CHuDWah said:

I'm not a Packard guy so question:  what are the chrome-cover thingies on the fenders in front of the cowl?  Tool boxes?

 

I think 1932 was the last year that Packard had those chrome-cover thingies on the fenders.  One is for the battery box and the other for a tool box.  Wonderfully convenient with easy access not only to the tools you want but the battery.  Having had cars with the battery under the front or rear floor, these fender boxes are just great.  I don't understand why they didn't use them right through 1937 which had the last of the swoopy fenders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 1:25 PM, m-mman said:

The perspective on values that is consistently left off, is the COST OF RESTORATION. 

No, I think people are aware of the cost of restoration.  But, the cost of restoration, just like what a seller paid for a car, is totally irrelevant when it comes to what the car is WORTH to a potential buyer.

 

It's true, you can't restore a lot of cars for what the asking price might be, but that doesn't matter.  You can spend $100K restoring a 1931 Model A tudor sedan (not an idle comment, I've seen it done), but it will NEVER be worth the cost of restoration.

 

You will be ahead of the game if you restore a very rare car, or a very desirable car, but 99% of the cars out there will cost more to restore than they're ever going to be worth.  A great reason to buy restored cars, as you can get them for less than what it would take you to get there from ground zero.

 

The same is true of what someone paid for a car.  A fellow buys a rare car for $2000, or $200,000, doesn't matter .... the car is worth X in the market, and what he paid is not a factor.  I've had that happen to me, I've bought a car really right, and people knew it, so tried to low ball offers when I had car for sale.  Doesn't matter what I  paid, it's what the car is WORTH....

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/13/2018 at 7:32 PM, Matt Harwood said:

 

Does this Packard carry a "crazy" price? 

Nope. I had one, and this may have been it, rear spare and all. Last I heard it was in NY state. I sold it in the early/mid 90s for $28,000 in ORIGINAL CONDITION. Personally I'd have never touched it more than I had but the next lover went for it and bless their heart. 

 

Value? Roll up the average shop rates nationwide and you'll land somehwere near $80/hr. Some are $135/hr, some are in the 50s. You can't just add $$$$$ spent + the car's value when it was started. There's value within the will and dedication of getting it done. For hanging the dough out there and making sure the car remains in play. What's that worth? An unwanted rectal exam? More than the sum total? A cup of coffee? None of the above? I have my own perspectives on this schtick we call a hobby/investment/passion et al. 

 

A guy buys an Aston Martin 8-9 years ago, drives it like a collector car, and today it's worth 1/2 of the purchase price if he's lucky. Same goes for a late model Bentley cpe or conv. Other than a few excessive pinky raisers there's no real venue to enjoy such cars beyond flashy transportation. Spend that same dollar figure on something significant. Not your cousin's 6cyl Mustang coupe, try it on a Boss 429, a Packard "senior" model, a big brass car, maybe even some select early Ford V8s. The very worst case scenario is you'll earn the rate of inflation over time on some, on others you'll own em as long as you wish and get it all back when you're done. You owned it, made new friends, learned some additional auto history, maybe had your choice "peer reviewed" by winning the occasional show. Go do it with a new Bentley. Nope. Anyone ever see a concours for stock certificates? Can you drive a Beanie Baby? 

At the end of the day you get what you really like, the best you can afford, and treat it like the treasure it should be to you and those with similar interests and you can't go wrong. Leave the dollars and cents to the speculators who sometimes buy too late and sell too soon anyway. And don't scoff at the ones doing a full restoration. Some new cars can't even be purchased for that and sure to cost you up the ying-yang when it wears out. 

 

Thanks Matt, and thanks for those who read this far. Perspective kids, and don't forget to enjoy this gig...

 

This was when I had one. How I got it:

26155702_374814406317359_4119578672925507584_n.jpg.f03ec05bb6029357b9e838689df9dc77.jpg

 

What I did to it:

26864187_2034116189943843_7085276646197952512_n.jpg.b62fb0bc09b6a0e6f8d3663b2af8a270.jpg

It was fun... ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 1 that's all original with sidemounts that came from upstate NY. Impressive car to drive especially when you compare them to same year Ford, chevys etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My car (the car in question) was originally from New York City, spent most of its life in Connecticut, received a cosmetic restoration in the late 1970's, was acquired by me in about 2003 and I gave it a mechanical restoration.  So it is yet a third example of this body style around upstate New York.

 

I am a little surprised at the almost total lack of interest in the car, even with an ad in Hemmings.  Yes, a few tire kickers but no one serious.  I don't think the price is crazy, for all the reasons stated. And actually, I am growing more attached to it now that I had thoughts of finding a new owner.  So maybe this experiment worked out for the best after all.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before and after photos of the same car.

Amazing what an appropriate  color scheme can do !

The darker color is the authentic, original color scheme tastefully done by the previous owner in Connecticut. 

The light electric blue with marshmallows-for-wheels was something a misguided or mentally ill owner sprayed on over the original.  What were they thinking. . . . ??

When Frank got it.jpg

IMG_0701.JPG

Edited by scott12180 (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll vote for the latter interpretation of the car! That blue is way too far out there for my taste.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The '60s and '70s did a lot of damage to a lot of old cars. People cared less about "correct" and more about "I like what I like." To us today, with the benefit of hindsight, it looks dreadful, but I can clearly recall going to car shows in the '70s where you'd see row after row of brightly-colored garish old cars. Hell, how many suffered through the brown/tan with orange wheels and shiny brown vinyl upholstery phase? I bet 20% of all old cars were that particular combination at one point or another.

 

Scott, if you don't need to sell it, I vote for continuing to enjoy it. Keep it for sale in a casual way and let people know it's available. Eventually someone will see it in use and that will be your buyer. Get out on some tours and let people see how well the car works. I think that is how you will have the most success moving this car and if not, at least you're enjoying it yourself. That matters, too! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great looking car. Maybe I should take some current photos of our '31 Model A Station Wagon and put it up for sale? Maybe I should sell a few Fords to make room for the Packard? Stay tuned.

Henry F.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Hell, how many suffered through the brown/tan with orange wheels and shiny brown vinyl upholstery phase? I bet 20% of all old cars were that particular combination at one point or another.

 

I plead GUILTY to that on a 31 Model A Coupe.  (Tan/Brown)  Had a 289 Ford V8, C6 Automatic, Jaguar suspenstion  and 35 Ford wire wheel centers in 15" rims.(Orange)

However the interior was Mustang II (Tan with orange highlights)

Only saving grace was that I never took it to antique car shows, only street to Street Rod  gatherings where everything else looked like jelly beans.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not about owning, having. It is about enjoying.  It is amazing how many cars you can ride in, even drive if you ask. I have even been handed the keys without asking. Once I said, if I take my shoes off, can I ride... turned out the driver was a handler, not the owner, and I did get the ride. I have had the privilege of working on some really cool stuff, didn't get paid, but then I didn't have to pay for the privilege.  This hobby, or what ever it is, is about gearheads, no a big cigar and having the star of the show. But if that is your thing, buy a Bantam for under $20,000. Life is good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some interesting and maybe not so nice about mine. In the left sail panel of the top there was an outward dent. Inside on the headliner side panel was a small hole. Well, it was a .38 caliber hole. A friend who was a cop at the time was as curious as I was. With it having some history in Colorado I just thought accidental discharge from a hunter or maybe an off duty officer of some sort. He brought over a special ultraviolet light a cpl days later so we could satisfy our mutual curiosity, lo and behold there were remnants of blood on the left of the rear seat cushion. I adjusted my thoughts to an accident, but the car was left in a Colorado garage for decades and had 22,000 original miles. That yellow glass in the picture was obviously original and I couldn't bear to remove it. 

 

So, was it a "hit"? An accident? Suicide? Who knows, but in my tenure with the car I left it all as-was. Such things are little more than interesting conversation, and I don't know how fruitful Denver was for typical gangster activity. Then again I prefer to consider most Packard models not in the radar of those types back then. Some dealers would discourage underworld types from buying from them as well. What do you guys n gals think? Somewhere in the massive picture collection I have some close ups, finding them would be the challenge.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/8/2018 at 9:45 AM, Highlander160 said:

Some interesting and maybe not so nice about mine. In the left sail panel of the top there was an outward dent. Inside on the headliner side panel was a small hole. Well, it was a .38 caliber hole. A friend who was a cop at the time was as curious as I was. With it having some history in Colorado I just thought accidental discharge from a hunter or maybe an off duty officer of some sort. He brought over a special ultraviolet light a cpl days later so we could satisfy our mutual curiosity, lo and behold there were remnants of blood on the left of the rear seat cushion. I adjusted my thoughts to an accident, but the car was left in a Colorado garage for decades and had 22,000 original miles. That yellow glass in the picture was obviously original and I couldn't bear to remove it. 

 

So, was it a "hit"? An accident? Suicide? Who knows, but in my tenure with the car I left it all as-was. Such things are little more than interesting conversation, and I don't know how fruitful Denver was for typical gangster activity. Then again I prefer to consider most Packard models not in the radar of those types back then. Some dealers would discourage underworld types from buying from them as well. What do you guys n gals think? Somewhere in the massive picture collection I have some close ups, finding them would be the challenge.

You mean bullets don't bounce off cars like they do in movies?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh bien, çà chauffe, Daniel !

Il fut pourtant un temps où, vous aussi, vendiez une Packard 1932... C'était en Juillet 2010, une limousine (7-passenger sedan) 902 verte...

1096_1279008772_resized_p1040063.jpg

732731.jpg

732721.jpg

1096_1279008831_resized_p1010130.jpg

1096_1279008859_resized_p1010131.jpg

1096_1279008901_resized_p1010133.jpg

1096_1279008803_resized_p1040062.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now