Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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I'll suggest that your work is very good if it'll stand up to the photo views. You say they are forgiving, but most model hobbyists think that, because the camera only 'sees' what is there it'll never get fooled into seeing what it wants. Therefore, if no flaws- or very few- show in the pictures, it's because they really aren't there. I've used photos to find goofs in my brass locomotive construction, and sure enough, a screw head that my eye accepts looks like holy hell in a photo. Just as an example.  Roger, your modeling is extraordinary. Thanks for the inspiration.

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Roger,

I just can't believe that your body, painted now in blue, is a 1:12 rendition of the Mark.  With all the body creases, indentations, and "stampings" it looks just like the 1:1 car.  Just amazing.  And the finish in the pictures (without the clear coat) shows all the details.  Putting on the clear coat will "blind" us with the dazzling finish.  At least you can photograph the body without the reflection.  Just beautiful.  

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Thanks Randy!

 

Indeed that paint is drying very fast. Today, “just to see”, I sanded and polished the roof because it had some dust particles, plus a spot barely visible where I did repairs before the paint. Fortunately, all those imperfections are gone.

 

The frame was painted black this afternoon; I will let it some days to dry before I will begin to assemble all the parts you see in that attached picture. The frame, the main body and some small parts are stored in another place.

954 parts.JPG

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For a week now I painted the body. Some imperfections could be sanded down and polished; I’m far from ready. The problem is I don’t know how thick the clear coat is and I don’t want to get to the color coat, it would be a disaster!

In between, I painted the frame. The quality standard must not be the same as for the body; it was a light job. I began to assemble the many parts waiting; the first “victim” was the rear axle.

I believe that the Bible is saying something like “the last ones will be the first ones” (I was not too keen at those stories). I did that too: the last part to be fabricated was the antenna; it’s the first to be installed on the front fender! The mast will be added at the end, too dangerous during the assembly!

 

955 Painted frame.JPG

956 First chromed part.JPG

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Roger, 

        

    Your work just amazes me! The level of detail and scale is wonderful. I just don't know how you manage to make those small parts in that scale! Beautiful work!

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As excited and happy as I am to see the assembly of all of these amazing pieces begin, it also brings about a little sadness, this means that the project will be coming to an end.

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It will take some time to finish: to insert the first  screws inside the body, I had to make a special tool...

 

@Alex: my assembly line is not looking exactly the same way!

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Don't let Roger fool you. He has little helpers for the assembly process. You can see that same quarter on the floor.  

 

I can't wait until it starts getting back together. Just so cool.

 

 

 

car.jpg

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3 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Don't let Roger fool you. He has little helpers for the assembly process. You can see that same quarter on the floor.  

 

Ah! Here it is! I was wondering where that damn quarter was...Glad you found it!

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 I can understand your sadness when the build comes to and end, as I will be as well. I so much enjoy seeing your progress, and how you overcome the difficulties of the construction.

However, on the flip side, i will be awesome to see the finished product.

Keith

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The last few days, I assembled the large components on the frame and some on the body. As the parts were done a long time ago for most, I have to be careful with the installation sequence. The hand brake lever is made with 2 parts; logically I attached the first one (a support) to the body, just to notice that a screw attaching the lever to the support cannot be inserted. Remove the whole and began again. Then a screw broke…Fortunately, I could extract it without drama. Once all was into the body, I just noticed that the lever can be pushed back, it does not hold! After removal, I saw that the lack of lubrication was the culprit… The fourth tentative was the good one! In between, I had to fabricate a wrench to tighten the screws. Working inside the painted car is of course requiring more care which translates with more time.

 

The assembly of the large elements on the frame was straight forwards with one difference: not all elements were previously assembled together. I notice some interference between the brake lines at the rear axle and the transversal exhaust tube; some “massage” was in order.

 

The shock absorbers were done for 6 years, but were unpainted. Usually, those parts are black but, with a black frame and black underbody, some fantasy was needed: I painted them the same color as the body. The purists will jump; I can say that it was a special request from the owner! It was a challenge to insert the front shock absorbers at the hole in the frame because as they are not gas charged, the rod retracts if not exactly at the hole…

 

All is good? Not quite: I’m unsure if the hand brake will function. There is a provision to adjust the cable at the equalizer; on the real car this is done by removing a cover at the tunnel. Even if I would have done a removable cover, I would have been unable to turn the nuts…Another problem:  the cable which is emerging from the frame (on the frame picture, this is near the steering box) must be attached at the shiny lever which can be seen on another picture. This can only be done when the body will be mated to the frame with all elements in the way, like engine, battery support and so on. Maybe I will be able to connect both with the help of a special tool, who knows…

957 Almost completed frame.JPG

958 Hand brake cable.JPG

959 Hand brake lever.JPG

960 brake elements.JPG

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Maybe Pat, maybe! Over the years, I restored 3 Cadillacs from the fifties...When my last one was ready, about 2001 or 2002, I said: never again! On the attached picture, this is my workplace. Almost everything is done here, except the paint which is done in the kitchen.

As you can see, the frame is in the background!

DSC00360.JPG

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Mon Dieu ! ! !     (I don't spell in French too well),

 

Geeeez Roger, 

 

The frame with the detail and looking at the firewall of the Mark is so realistic.  If one did not know better, they  would think that these elements are being posed for the technical manual from Ford on the Continental.

It is getting exciting to see the frame come together with all of the elements that we watched you fabricate.  Now we get to see how they all fit together and the finished look of that part of the build. 

 

It is sad that the people seeing the car completed, even with the car inverted for pictures of the underside, will not see all of the painstaking detail that you have been through with this model.  I am in amazement, along with the rest of the followers of your thread, at how exact the 1:12 looks compared to the full sized components. 

 

I will save the biggest and longest  Bravo's till the car is complete.  You get the deserving compliments every  time that you post.  Many watch and do not add compliments but you must know that they are out there waiting to see the next installment.

 

Randy 

 

 

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On 5/5/2018 at 11:34 AM, Randiego said:

Mon Dieu ! ! !     (I don't spell in French too well),

 

Geeeez Roger, 

 

The frame with the detail and looking at the firewall of the Mark is so realistic.  If one did not know better, they  would think that these elements are being posed for the technical manual from Ford on the Continental.

It is getting exciting to see the frame come together with all of the elements that we watched you fabricate.  Now we get to see how they all fit together and the finished look of that part of the build. 

 

It is sad that the people seeing the car completed, even with the car inverted for pictures of the underside, will not see all of the painstaking detail that you have been through with this model.  I am in amazement, along with the rest of the followers of your thread, at how exact the 1:12 looks compared to the full sized components. 

 

I will save the biggest and longest  Bravo's till the car is complete.  You get the deserving compliments every  time that you post.  Many watch and do not add compliments but you must know that they are out there waiting to see the next installment.

 

Randy 

 

 

Randy is exactly right. I am a scale model builder in addition to a car restorer. Nobody i have ever seen anywhere in world is in the same league as Roger. I guess in every hobby, sport or avocation, someone has to be the best in the world,  right? In model building, Roger is that someone. I appreciate Roger taking all of us for the ride.

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It really is incredible, surreal even.  I see it, I know it is real, but it is still hard to fathom.  It is almost easier to believe that Roger has built a shrinking machine and is just shrinking down full size parts and fooling us.    AH, now I know... he has invented a shrinking AND enlarging machine.  He makes the small parts as rough reasonable facsimiles, then enlarges them so he can easily add detail and then he shrinks them back down.  Yes, that is the explanation.   I bet the "special tool for assembly" is just this... he momentarily enlarges the car so he can get in there and put a few parts in place and then shrinks it back down before the time/space continuum is disrupted. 

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)

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Jeff, that would be a fantastic machine! The problem to attach the hand brake cable to the lever would be solved almost with closed eyes! I think I will order such a machine for the coming Christmas; why did you not come earlier with that solution?

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