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Ever find any cool old stuff while restoring?


Justinlb
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Not the coin,  it was used for reference.

These bullets were found in the part of the body that has been circled in green.

.380 Autos, I'm not a fire arms person so don't know much about them.

Would they only be used in a hand gun?

 

22 calibre are popular for vermin here,  these seem unnecessarily big for that.

 

Was cool anyway.   If only cars and trucks could talk,  some would have quite the story to tell!

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39 minutes ago, 1937McBuick said:

Not the coin,  it was used for reference.

These bullets were found in the part of the body that has been circled in green.

.380 Autos, I'm not a fire arms person so don't know much about them.

Would they only be used in a hand gun?

 

22 calibre are popular for vermin here,  these seem unnecessarily big for that.

 

Was cool anyway.   If only cars and trucks could talk,  some would have quite the story to tell!

20200119_085822.jpg

20190321_135448.jpg

Resized_20190225_152038_6601~2.jpeg

That's a really weird spot to have ammo. Makes you wonder what the reason to store it there was.

Yeah that's handgun ammo.

Edited by Justinlb (see edit history)
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I found the original 1917 California license tag behind the door upholstery when I was having the car re-upholstered. This tag attached to the porcelain blue and white plates used for several years.

My car is a 1918 Buick 6 cylinder touring built in late 1917.

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In the passenger side front door pocket I found a big stash of rubber bands and paper clips, the rubber bands were hard as rocks and brittle as corn chips, and a pencil with a rock-hard eraser on it. The pencil said Civil Service on it. This, plus the fact that the toe tags on the floor were worn out on the passenger side, makes me know that my car was used for delivering a postal rural route. The driver sat on the passenger side and delivered mail while reaching the left foot over for the clutch and brake, his right foot on the passenger side and for the gas pedal, just like they do today!

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When Gary Martin was putting the new upholstery in our 1916 D-45, he found this Buick Motor Company document stuffed behind the rear passenger door panel.  This gives factory documentation that this car was built in October of 1915.  We can factually say that this car is indeed a 'Brass Era' automobile since it was built before January 1st, 1916.  We like to think of this document as the 'birth certificate' for this Buick.  This was a very incredible surprise to say the least.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

AACA Life Member #947918

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It is always fun to find items that relate to the history or era of the car, I collected tons of this kind of stuff. Since I have been into old cars (60 yrs) I thought putting this into appropriate years and making "GloveBox Goodies". I have made and sold these off and on for quite a while and everyone likes them. Any year (not make) from the late teens to around '76. 

$12 PP. PM if any interest.

 

The photo is a sample of what I do, no two are the same of course.

glovebox goodies.jpg

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13 hours ago, Justinlb said:

That's a really weird spot to have ammo. Makes you wonder what the reason to store it there was.

Yeah that's handgun ammo.

I'm not sure if they were  intentionally put there,   or they somehow fell into that area.

There were only two.

 

I tried doing car genealogy(finding previous owners before the person I bought it from) but was unsuccessful.  I may not have been able to talk with the actual owners but would have even liked to talk to their families.  This car came out of rural "Saskatchewan"(Canada),  farming country were land can stay in families for decades and local history is well known,  but still didn't have any luck finding anything out about previous owners or the car's history.

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13 hours ago, tcslr said:

380 is 9mmKurz ( German for short).  Look at the head stamps and you could figure out when that ammo was made ( and sometimes) where.

There were more letters stamped into the back of the casing along with the 380 AUTO stamp.  Those appear to be "WRA".(as best as I can tell).

I don't know what head stamps are or where to find them.  I am not gun and ammo savvy.

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  • 1 month later...

I opened one of the doors on my spare car looking for a build sheet like Terry's. I found this and thought I found one, but when I looked it was an ad brochure for Willard Battery Co.

 

I don't know what marketing genius at Willard decided to bury these advertisements inside doors where people won't see them until 100 years later, but it explains why they are out of business.

 

 

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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