Smartin

New shop going up!

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To say that I'm excited might be an understatement.  I've been wanting to do this since I bought my first house 15 years ago.  We now live on several acres and have the room to do it.  Financially, I didn't think I would be able to make this happen for a few more years, but I waved my magic wand and figured out a way to do it a little sooner than that.  The plan right now is to get the building up, then pour a floor and driveway in the Spring...when I have some more money to spend.

 

I spent months trying to figure out a good spot for this building...and tried all avenues of gaining workshop space.  Original idea was to put up a pole building behind the house, but my wife didn't want to be able to see it from the back windows.....so scratched that idea.  Next idea was to bridge the gap between my house garage and the current detached garage.  Great idea in my head, but the roof lines were making it almost impossible to make it work right.  No contractor wanted to touch it, either.  NEXT idea....build another separate garage in front of the detached garage toward the street.  Great idea, but my building line on the property was 50', and I would have been well into that easement.

 

So here we are.  Close to my original idea of going behind the house with a pole building.  With no other choice, my wife caved in to the idea.  I promised we would plant some trees😀

 

Speaking of trees, I am smack-dab in the middle of the deep woods.  In order to get this building up, a massive pile of trees had to go.  Originally, the size of the building was to be 40x60.  I got the property line surveyed, and the only way I could fit that building in the spot we were looking at, was to get rid of a tree we were really trying to keep alive.  I downsized to a 35x56, and that allowed us to fit the building right where we wanted it. 

 

Fast forward through several tree removal bids, I hooked up with a guy I knew in high school, and have kept in light contact with for a while.  I found out he was in the business and he came out.  We walked the area and painted the trees to be removed.  We estimated about 30 decent sized trees, with countless saplings.  I also had to clear a road to get back there...which meant more trees.  And a blessing from the neighbor, because I was encroaching on his property with said road.  All of my bids were in the $12k and higher range to get the trees done.  My guy ended up doing this for $9k...PLUS he brought out his 8' wide brush hog and cleared me a path through the woods and to the creek.  He also chipped all the wood that was less than 15" in diameter and mulched my entire path.  9 grand was a tough pill to swallow, but it was better than $12k.  I got a cool little walking trail out of it too.  Anyone need firewood?

 

Next on the agenda was to build up a pad.  The area where the building was going had a light slope down toward the back.  Our irrigation company has used a certain guy for hauling rock for years, so I called him.  He actually builds all of the pads for a local pole building construction company, so he was perfect for the job.  He ended up having to raise the back end of the pad up 5 feet to get it level with the front.  650 tons of screenings later, I have a pad.  Also, he brought in 100 ton of 2-4" clean rock to stabilize the screenings around the border.  Screenings will wash away in a rain unless they are buried or stabilized like this.  So, another $8500 for a pad.  At this point, I am starting to question whether I can financially swing this building.  These two items that have been done at this point have almost doubled my budget.  I would figure it out...onward!

 

The guy building the shop is a full time lineman for a local electric service provider.  This is his side gig, so his schedule is a bit volatile.  Since late August, the pad has basically set idle.  Since then, I had gotten all the necessary permitting and plans completed....doors and windows ordered.  Colors picked out.  So his last building he was working on ended up being a lot more than he originally anticipated...hence the delay.  This last week, we finally got moving.  All of the poles are set.  Trusses are waiting patiently in the front near the haul road.  It's like Christmas every time I come home and see him working!

 

Photos in the next couple posts...

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I work on mine every day,  but I bet you get yours finished first.   Keep us posted. 

Atleast you got some nice Firewood.  I had all pine.  Many were 75 to 100 feet tall and only the butt log of some were worth sawing. 

That 9 G is well spent.  I cut all the trees down with my Father, who forgot he was suppose to help me that day so he just dropped them all,  which made this huge mess,  then the wife and I chipped all the brush, stacked the logs and tried to give away as much free wood as I could, but not many people wanted the soft wood,  even for their boilers. 

Finally found a guy to do some major excavating as my site, though it looked fairly level,  was so far off we hauled in 480 yards of fill, as a bonus,  every time he hauled a load of fill in,  he hauled a load of stumps and logs out. 

You'll be amazed at how much the little stuff adds up as you wade through your project.   I was thinking today,  while buying two more boxes of screws for $50,  I bet I have spent over 2 grand just in nails and screws. Probably another $1500 to $2000 in Stain. 

Keep posting prices as well.  I did on my build so guys looking into building a project can see what they really cost to build.  I did some preliminary estimating but have well surpassed that. It's nice as I really had trouble finding any prices on what my project might cost other than pulling up prices of material and doing rough figures for labor.  

Also let us know time frames to get stuff done.  That will help other guys plan.  Especially guys that have to deal with winter,  so they plan for enough time to finish before snow flies. 

Good luck.  It's a great start. 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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I just got a quote (which I rejected) for $575 to load and haul off (1) big limb that at the largest 10 inch in diameter and maybe 20 feet long.

When you usually do the work yourself,  you loose touch with what people want or need to stay in business.    Get more than one quote.

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Wow I would have been scared to see what they would have wanted to Chip what I did.  I chipped with my commercial 12 inch Chipper Loading it by the arm fulls, for probably 12 hours.  6 hours for 2 days.  Two big mountains of limbs.  They were actually more like walls that were 20 or more feet long by 6 feet tall and that was with the limbs all neatly stacked and the upper weight compacting the lower limbs. 

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It looks like it will be a very nice shop.  You’ll have to let us in on the materials and what amenities you are planning for.  I spent a lot of time planning and designing my shop and still ended up with quite a few things I wish I could do over.  
 

Regarding your poles, are they set in concrete?  About how deep in the ground are they?  I’ve been tossing around an idea of building a pavilion type building for storing my unrestored buicks and tractors.  I like this type of construction and having a sawmill makes lumber costs nil.

 

Please keep us posted and congratulations!

Joel

 

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Poles are set in quickcrete 42" deep, and sitting on concrete pucks at the bottom of the hole.

 

I've neglected updating this thread...building is up.  I have it mostly wired, with the exception of some big stuff that I'm not sure will be located.  I'm getting a bid on closed cell insulation on Monday...I have a feeling I'll be shocked, but we will find out.  Also Monday, the ceiling is going up.  It is corrugated steel like the walls, but bright white.  Lighting will be six 4' high bay lights spaced evenly...wired in 2 zones so I only have to run one side if needed.  30,000 lumens each.  Should do the trick.  I'll wait for wall covering once insulation and concrete floor are poured.  According to the electric company, I was on the hook for my own wiring and conduit for the electric service from the pole to the building...about 160'.  $1k later, I have power.  Lots of nickel dime stuff has really inflated the cost on this project.  I started this job shooting from the hip...and I'll end it doing so.🤣

 

We built shutters for the windows to help the aesthetics of the exterior.  Also added an old style barn light at the peak above the garage door.  The garage door is from Menards and is R18.4 insulation value...biggest I could find, and cheapest, really.  I've been taking advantage of Menards' 11% off sales a LOT.

 

Still getting numbers for concrete...so far it's $13.5k for the floor by itself.  I'm still toying with the idea of extending the driveway to the door if $ permits this Spring.

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Edited by Smartin (see edit history)
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Looks good.  You forgot all the in between photos.

 Like the shutters and extra windows as well as the two toning on the siding.  Makes it look a little more residential.  Nice overhangs as well.  You'll be happy you went with those.  It's funny to see guys cheap on stuff like that,  but it makes a world of difference in the end.   

Keep us posted on the future work.  Prices are also nice as it helps guys pondering see what it really costs.  I went into mine fairly blind and ran over on every expense because I had nothing to go on. 

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What is concrete selling for these days?     What are they charging per yard for finishing? 

a yard should give you 243 sq ft of concrete 4 inches thick.   If it is $100 per yard, that is only 41 cents a sq ft.

That does not take in footing and labor,    earlier you said the size is 35 X 56 (1960 sq ft) and you have $13,5 in the concrete

that is $6.90 a sq ft including the forming, foundation, reinforcing etc......

My daughter is thinking about a detached garage so I have been doing some estimating for that.... we don't need much foundation

as the freeze line is inches.... the $$$ just keep adding up.

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That's about right, Barney.  Also that price includes about 6" of rock inside to bring it up to 4" below finish floor. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

No foundation here...basically a floating floor.  Frost wall at the man door.

 

Here are a couple in-progress pics...an one with the garage door.

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Thanks for the reply.......reread your early post and now I understand the site prep.

Did you purchase the building as a "package"  looks great,   are you going to insulate? 

I have also looked into using metal shipping containers for a base and span them with some sort of trusses

while they are pretty cheap,  their size limits your options.

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It isn't really a kit...mostly a design-build job.  I stated how big I wanted it, and he built it to that size.  The trusses were ordered from a company that specializes in building them, same with the poles.  They are laminated...basically three 2x6's mashed together.  The lower parts that are close to the ground are treated.  Everything else is cut and built on site.  I used adobe white standard finish steel for the light color, and went with a bronze/really dark something with a hammered finish on the lower color.  Roof is the same color in standard finish.  The hammered finish is really durable and is very scratch resistant.

 

Insulation-wise, I have a guy coming tomorrow to price the job.  I stated I would like to see closed cell foam, but I don't know that I can swing that $ at this point yet.  I will find out.

 

I hear advice all the time about what I should do the first time around regarding finishes and do-this do-that, but it all comes down to how much I can afford at a given time.  I am doing my best to get this building done at a reasonable pace without "cutting corners" per se.  Once concrete is down, I will move my operation to this building while I continue to improve the place. 

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9 hours ago, Barney Eaton said:

What is concrete selling for these days?     What are they charging per yard for finishing? 

a yard should give you 243 sq ft of concrete 4 inches thick.   If it is $100 per yard, that is only 41 cents a sq ft.

That does not take in footing and labor,    earlier you said the size is 35 X 56 (1960 sq ft) and you have $13,5 in the concrete

that is $6.90 a sq ft including the forming, foundation, reinforcing etc......

My daughter is thinking about a detached garage so I have been doing some estimating for that.... we don't need much foundation

as the freeze line is inches.... the $$$ just keep adding up.

Check that math Barney, a yard of concrete 4” thick covers only 81 sq ft and at $100 per yd that puts you up to $1.25 a foot.  Here in Oklahoma, you can get it finished for $3 and that includes forming, rebar and plastic vapor barrier.  Total cost is $4.25 /ft.  
 

I’ve spent some time thinking about how to save some of the $3.00/ft labor and there may be way but you have to divide to conquer. And, you may be faced with minimum 5 or 6 yards to avoid paying a delivery charge.  
 

If you formed up an 8 ft wide strip running the length of your building, it wouldn’t be too difficult for you and a buddy or two to pour that strip.  Use the form boards and a screed to level the concrete. Then use a bull float to further level and push the rock down so the fat comes to the top.  Trowel it out by hand as it sets.  You can reach to the middle by working from both sides.  In a couple days pull the form and do another 8ft strip.  Or, just wait until you’re ready.  
 

Your building looks great.  It has appealing proportions and the shutters really take away that cold commercial look.  I’ve watched your work for years; enough to know that if you attempted concrete yourself, it would turn out great.

 

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Thanks...I appreciate your confidence in my abilities!  I could probably do it...not sure I would ever be happy with it though.  I have several friends in the construction industry and have pulled many strings so far to get where I am at this point.  I think I will for sure have my guy do the floor...might pour the drive myself.

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The guys made it about 2/3 through the ceiling today.  They should be back tomorrow after work.

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No dice on finishing the ceiling.  They both have day jobs at the power company as linemen...and the weather hasn’t been great lately.  Looks like the end of the week if this next weather event isn’t too bad.
 

I added a little thing yesterday 🤓

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Lights are in!

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See you are already ahead of me.  I bought one case of LED lights for mine and they are still int he corner in the box.  Of course I only have an extension Cord for power right now so I wasn't in a big rush to get them up.  Looking good.  You'll be sweeping your cement floor before i even get power run to mine,  much less a cement floor. 

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On ‎1‎/‎19‎/‎2020 at 6:29 PM, Barney Eaton said:

I have also looked into using metal shipping containers for a base and span them with some sort of trusses

while they are pretty cheap,  their size limits your options.

 

Other than the 20'x30' building I am using 40' shipping containers for storing our antique cars and our Camaro & Corvette in the winter.  Reason is simple.  When I asked about putting up another building the tax assessor told me that they were going to TRIPLE MY TAXES.  I looked her in the eye and said I was going to use shipping containers be cause they are portable and no taxes with them sitting on the ground. (it is a commercial property).  Kind of sad because I was going to make the property look better with a building but it looks OK for a commercial property.

 

They will not work for a '66 Deuce & quarter though.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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I stand corrected on the amount in a yard.......... 81 sq ft  4 in thick is correct.

 

Also on the storage containers.......how do cities and counties assess these covers for storage containers?

 

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On 1/24/2020 at 9:49 PM, auburnseeker said:

 

See you are already ahead of me.

 


Don’t feel bad, EVERYBODY is ahead of me and I started before everybody 😭

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25 minutes ago, MrEarl said:


Don’t feel bad, EVERYBODY is ahead of me and I started before everybody 😭

No you are still way ahead of me.  You have a floor and electric.  I still don't even have my CO.  Though i realistically Probably have a good day's worth of work left to get it putting flashing over my foundation insulation inside. 

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