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To say that I'm excited might be an understatement.  I've been wanting to do this since I bought my first house 15 years ago.  We now live on several acres and have the room to do it.  Financially, I didn't think I would be able to make this happen for a few more years, but I waved my magic wand and figured out a way to do it a little sooner than that.  The plan right now is to get the building up, then pour a floor and driveway in the Spring...when I have some more money to spend.

 

I spent months trying to figure out a good spot for this building...and tried all avenues of gaining workshop space.  Original idea was to put up a pole building behind the house, but my wife didn't want to be able to see it from the back windows.....so scratched that idea.  Next idea was to bridge the gap between my house garage and the current detached garage.  Great idea in my head, but the roof lines were making it almost impossible to make it work right.  No contractor wanted to touch it, either.  NEXT idea....build another separate garage in front of the detached garage toward the street.  Great idea, but my building line on the property was 50', and I would have been well into that easement.

 

So here we are.  Close to my original idea of going behind the house with a pole building.  With no other choice, my wife caved in to the idea.  I promised we would plant some trees😀

 

Speaking of trees, I am smack-dab in the middle of the deep woods.  In order to get this building up, a massive pile of trees had to go.  Originally, the size of the building was to be 40x60.  I got the property line surveyed, and the only way I could fit that building in the spot we were looking at, was to get rid of a tree we were really trying to keep alive.  I downsized to a 35x56, and that allowed us to fit the building right where we wanted it. 

 

Fast forward through several tree removal bids, I hooked up with a guy I knew in high school, and have kept in light contact with for a while.  I found out he was in the business and he came out.  We walked the area and painted the trees to be removed.  We estimated about 30 decent sized trees, with countless saplings.  I also had to clear a road to get back there...which meant more trees.  And a blessing from the neighbor, because I was encroaching on his property with said road.  All of my bids were in the $12k and higher range to get the trees done.  My guy ended up doing this for $9k...PLUS he brought out his 8' wide brush hog and cleared me a path through the woods and to the creek.  He also chipped all the wood that was less than 15" in diameter and mulched my entire path.  9 grand was a tough pill to swallow, but it was better than $12k.  I got a cool little walking trail out of it too.  Anyone need firewood?

 

Next on the agenda was to build up a pad.  The area where the building was going had a light slope down toward the back.  Our irrigation company has used a certain guy for hauling rock for years, so I called him.  He actually builds all of the pads for a local pole building construction company, so he was perfect for the job.  He ended up having to raise the back end of the pad up 5 feet to get it level with the front.  650 tons of screenings later, I have a pad.  Also, he brought in 100 ton of 2-4" clean rock to stabilize the screenings around the border.  Screenings will wash away in a rain unless they are buried or stabilized like this.  So, another $8500 for a pad.  At this point, I am starting to question whether I can financially swing this building.  These two items that have been done at this point have almost doubled my budget.  I would figure it out...onward!

 

The guy building the shop is a full time lineman for a local electric service provider.  This is his side gig, so his schedule is a bit volatile.  Since late August, the pad has basically set idle.  Since then, I had gotten all the necessary permitting and plans completed....doors and windows ordered.  Colors picked out.  So his last building he was working on ended up being a lot more than he originally anticipated...hence the delay.  This last week, we finally got moving.  All of the poles are set.  Trusses are waiting patiently in the front near the haul road.  It's like Christmas every time I come home and see him working!

 

Photos in the next couple posts...

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Progression of the area...

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Good start.. More pictures as you go.

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I work on mine every day,  but I bet you get yours finished first.   Keep us posted. 

Atleast you got some nice Firewood.  I had all pine.  Many were 75 to 100 feet tall and only the butt log of some were worth sawing. 

That 9 G is well spent.  I cut all the trees down with my Father, who forgot he was suppose to help me that day so he just dropped them all,  which made this huge mess,  then the wife and I chipped all the brush, stacked the logs and tried to give away as much free wood as I could, but not many people wanted the soft wood,  even for their boilers. 

Finally found a guy to do some major excavating as my site, though it looked fairly level,  was so far off we hauled in 480 yards of fill, as a bonus,  every time he hauled a load of fill in,  he hauled a load of stumps and logs out. 

You'll be amazed at how much the little stuff adds up as you wade through your project.   I was thinking today,  while buying two more boxes of screws for $50,  I bet I have spent over 2 grand just in nails and screws. Probably another $1500 to $2000 in Stain. 

Keep posting prices as well.  I did on my build so guys looking into building a project can see what they really cost to build.  I did some preliminary estimating but have well surpassed that. It's nice as I really had trouble finding any prices on what my project might cost other than pulling up prices of material and doing rough figures for labor.  

Also let us know time frames to get stuff done.  That will help other guys plan.  Especially guys that have to deal with winter,  so they plan for enough time to finish before snow flies. 

Good luck.  It's a great start. 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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I just got a quote (which I rejected) for $575 to load and haul off (1) big limb that at the largest 10 inch in diameter and maybe 20 feet long.

When you usually do the work yourself,  you loose touch with what people want or need to stay in business.    Get more than one quote.

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Wow I would have been scared to see what they would have wanted to Chip what I did.  I chipped with my commercial 12 inch Chipper Loading it by the arm fulls, for probably 12 hours.  6 hours for 2 days.  Two big mountains of limbs.  They were actually more like walls that were 20 or more feet long by 6 feet tall and that was with the limbs all neatly stacked and the upper weight compacting the lower limbs. 

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It looks like it will be a very nice shop.  You’ll have to let us in on the materials and what amenities you are planning for.  I spent a lot of time planning and designing my shop and still ended up with quite a few things I wish I could do over.  
 

Regarding your poles, are they set in concrete?  About how deep in the ground are they?  I’ve been tossing around an idea of building a pavilion type building for storing my unrestored buicks and tractors.  I like this type of construction and having a sawmill makes lumber costs nil.

 

Please keep us posted and congratulations!

Joel

 

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