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stealthbob

Trying to match Cad colour.....

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Those look just fine Bob. BTW: Could you give us the exact mix/ratio formula used? That would save a lot of time for all of us who are now going to follow and copy what you did, ;)

I am in the process of setting up for powder coating myself. I have been considering calling around and asking appliance dealers and the like, to set aside a large electric oven, hopefully one with the nice necessary built-ins like digital timers, bake variance control and the likes. You know ones they may be considering hauling away cause they're just too ugly but work nicely.

Another, idea is to just get some metal sheet and weld a nice large box up with side and front doors for access loading. Also install a divider for doing just small pieces. Then put in a pair of junk elements in the right locations to cover the real estate and a vent hole(s) to a duct that could have a fan attached for suction/venting of the oven. That way any large pieces could be done on site and as well as any small piece.

Thinking going this route cause it seems I can get the gutted elements and controls easier from recyclers than finding the right sized and optioned electric oven.

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Did some melting did we.....hehehe

A retaining bracket for AC system, was an alloy to which I found puddled in the bottom of the oven attempting to burn off some stubborn gaskets. DOH! Powdercoated fine at 375-400 degree's, but liquefied at 900. Lesson learned.

Thanks for the tip on the Gold Cad -- that is certainly "close enough" in my book for a driver, and then some.

Budd

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I use a household freestanding oven/range that I picked up off of Craigslist for $50. It's in the garage (away from the wife) and shares the same 30amp 220v plug that I use for my welder, and just unplug one/plug the other when I need to use them. I am able to coat up to something the size of a tire rim, but nothing larger. The only other "large piece" solution I've seen for home use would be infrared panels and a laser thermometer , where you heat up sections of the part to temp and move the IR panels along as needed for proper curing. Theoretically you could do your frame and such with these, but would probably be less hassle to just ship it to your local powder coater.

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Budd

Edited by Budd (see edit history)

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Great pics...those Silver parts look nice. I have the exact setup but got lucky when my parents switched to a gas range. Your point of having a separate oven for this is important.

David, you seem to think BIG...nice! You are right that these can be built much larger and rather cheaply. I have seen many examples at the 365powder forums and also the Eastwoods forum has some great info as well.

As for the formula, I went with a 1/2 cup of Gold and 2/3 tsps each of Silver, Blue, Green (No Clear) All powders were from 365powder except for the Satin Black which was from eastwoods. Honestly I think just staying with the Gold/Silver would be fine, it lowers the Yellow out of the gold and gives it that look that changes colour at different angles. I don't really see any of the Blue or Green in the final product but who knows.

Edited by stealthbob (see edit history)

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All of the 55 plates I have worked with were gray on exposed surfaces and gold on the protected surfaces. A set of 54 plates that I acquired from a rodder are the same...

Willie

That'll do. Thanks Willie. But can you see if you can report a little earlier next time. I'm gonna have a hekuva time matching that layer of grease and road grime.

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Thanks for doing that for me Lamar..."Might as well", just clean the rest right?

Which one of your old girls was that from....or was that O'll Texas Pete?

The consensus is Gold...who am I to argue.

Big thanks to all of you...I think I will go and turn on my oven.

Edited by stealthbob (see edit history)

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Budd, with the rim resting on the oven rack, does it leave a mark where it rested on the rack?

Yes, it does. So I coat the rims twice -- first time doing the backside of the rim, then let it cool, and a second time flipped over to the front side. That way the exterior, more noticeable side, of the rim looks decent. The mark that the rack leaves on the back side is not that bad.

I only do this for rims cause they're so heavy. Everything else I use stainless steel wire to hang.

Budd

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That'll do. Thanks Willie. But can you see if you can report a little earlier next time. I'm gonna have a hekuva time matching that layer of grease and road grime.

Hey, what can I say...I'm old and slow.

I think you're trying to convince ol' Bob to send you those nasty gold plates in exchange for the ones you pictured...practice until he gets it right.:D

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I use a household freestanding oven/range that I picked up off of Craigslist for $50. It's in the garage (away from the wife) and shares the same 30amp 220v plug that I use for my welder, and just unplug one/plug the other when I need to use them. I am able to coat up to something the size of a tire rim, but nothing larger. The only other "large piece" solution I've seen for home use would be infrared panels and a laser thermometer , where you heat up sections of the part to temp and move the IR panels along as needed for proper curing. Theoretically you could do your frame and such with these, but would probably be less hassle to just ship it to your local powder coater.

Budd

Budd

When you mount and balance tires have them static balanced with all of the weights on the inside...It looks better and keeps from scratching your coating. Believe me, the ride will be as smooth or smoother than tires balanced with weights scattered all over both sides of the rim.

Willie

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Budd

When you mount and balance tires have them static balanced with all of the weights on the inside...It looks better and keeps from scratching your coating. Believe me, the ride will be as smooth or smoother than tires balanced with weights scattered all over both sides of the rim.

Willie

Will do Sir, thanks for the heads up.

Budd

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