Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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To fyreline: it would be fine if an assembly manual would be available and telling "don't do that way but put that thing here!" Halas, I have to "write" that manual myself and do the necessary corrections!

 

To Randy: I was almost sure that the jack would create some reaction because it's not at all expected on a scale model!

 

To keiser31 and Nelson: There is a pocket at the base of the rear bumper, near the attaching points to the frame, see the attached picture. On the front, the hook is grabbing at the bumper's bracket. On my Cadillacs from the fifties, the bumper jack brabs the bumper at its base, the hook is following the shape of the bumper. On the '57 Brougham, there is a hole at the bumper ends, the hook is coming into that hope. I discovered that when I have to lift the rear of the car after one levelling valve lost the air for the suspension during a drive. There were later slots into the bumpers; my '80 Olds had them.

 

Yesterday, I removed some pieces from the carpet (velvet) and the underlying material. Boy! I did not spare with the glue when I did that! I will use less in the future…Now, the RH door is permanently “attached” to the body with the wiring. To keep the excess wiring as short as possible, I put the door on some wood and protective material. That way, I can work into the car without be limited by the door. It would be nice to have connector(s) but they are taking too much space!

The wiring is held on the floor with instant glue; I hope that I will not have to do some modification! The wires are adding some height at the tunnel; I will have to do some padding on the tunnel to have a level surface with the wires.

Today, I will redo the carpeting on the RH side. The next step is to solder the wires to a circuit board which will be located behind the LH kick panel. After that, the dash will come in.

734 exhaust outlet tubes.JPG

1026 The wiring.JPG

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Fortunately, there are more good news than bad ones, at least with that model. Routing the door’s harness through the floor was not a big deal; I have enough slack to solder the wires on the board outside the car; on the first picture, you can see that board in its approximate final position. The plan is to do the same with the LH door: pass the wiring through the A pillar; the wire should be long enough to solder them at the corresponding place on that board slightly out of the car.

Once the carpet on the RH side was replaced, (the carpet under the feet will be installed later), I could try to install the dash; I had to take it out 2 times due to the routing of the remaining wires. The moldings at the base of the windshield could also be installed; by chance I could insert 5 from 6 small screws to attach the moldings to the firewall. The 6th screw could not be installed because, when I constructed those parts, the roof was not attached and that screw behind the instruments pod could be screwed in. Now, the roof is in the way…I will put a dummy screw to plug the hole.

I had to shorten a bit the upper door’s molding, it was touching at the rear quarter and at the dash; fortunately that molding is just pushed on the trim!

Yesterday, the trunk emblem came home from the chrome shop. Today, I put a new decal on the base and installed the assembly on the trunk. Honestly, the difference between the old emblem and to new one is not overwhelming; most probably the effort to make a new part was not necessary but I have now a part without design error.

1027 RH wiring complete.JPG

1028 dash and RH door.JPG

1029 Dash and RH door.JPG

1030 New emblem.JPG

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Trunk lid is  beautiful. It looked good before. But, knowing it's precise is a comfort to us watching this come together.

What solder do  you use that the fumes don't contaminate nearby items that are fully finished.? Are there registration papers in the glove box? I ask because you'll get pulled over for sure with no plates on the rear.. haha

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Thanks Pat! I'm using regular soft solder and only a few quantity of soldering grease. This is this product which is emitting fumes when used liberally. This is also the reason why I prefer to solder the wires outside of the car.

There are no registration paper in the glove box (I'm not equipped to create such documents at this scale), but a license plate will come. Don't know yet how it will look like, I still have a few months to decide!

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16 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

1030 New emblem.JPG

 

I sometimes wonder, Roger, how your photos would look if you changed the camera angle slightly so they looked as though they could have been taken by someone standing behind a real car. In this photo the car looks completely life-size, except that the camera position is higher than it could naturally be for an adult standing behind a car. It might be difficult to get the photo's background to look realistic if more of it is visible, but I'd love to see you try!

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Most of the time, I'm taking pictures just to show a specific detail or surround. It this case, the new emblem. But you are right, this art of pictures is not the way somebody would look at the real car, unless he is on a ladder.  A more realistic rear view will be done when I have some license plate attached on the bumper! The background is also an issue; it requires a different environment than my work desk.

Of course, once the model is ready, the following pictures will be done the way you described. I did them that way when the body was painted and on the frame.

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If one of my followers is asking for something, I may well try to do what was wanted! Here are 2 quick pictures at a different angle. With a better illumination the effect would be better. I'm probably a better scale model builder as a good photograph!

DSC00643.JPG

DSC00649.JPG

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Apart from the harshness of the camera's flash and the shadows it creates, those photos look incredibly life-like. It really is amazing to see the car in that condition.

 

(Maybe you could brush some soot in the exhaust pipes? It looks almost too perfect at the moment! :) )

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Mr Zimmermann,

I have, for a long time, without being a member of this forum and without giving you proper admiration, followed this amazing project. You are an inspiration to all of us people who are interested in old vehicles but also to those of us who believe that mankind can do almost anything we set our minds to. All your updates fill me with the greatest of joy! Thank you so much for showing this and for telling us so much about it along the way!

 

/Martin C, Sweden

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Is there a professional photographer in your area that would be willing to take some pictures of the model when it's all finished?  Maybe behind a white back drop or something more realistic.  That would be the icing on the cake. Just a thought.

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12 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Is there a professional photographer in your area that would be willing to take some pictures of the model when it's all finished?  Maybe behind a white back drop or something more realistic.  That would be the icing on the cake. Just a thought.

Yes, I know somebody who is talented and usually is working for the watch industry. Maybe something to consider!

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3 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Yes, I know somebody who is talented and usually is working for the watch industry. Maybe something to consider!

 

I think it's something a person with your talents could manage, Roger. ? I found this interesting page showing how one man in the US does it: https://petapixel.com/2013/10/14/life-like-miniature-scenes-shot-using-model-cars-forced-perspective-250-ps/

 

modelcars5.jpg

 

modelcars6.jpg

Edited by SiliconS (see edit history)
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Recently, I completed the steering column after I added the gear selector’s decal. By looking at the picture, the horn ring does not please me: the line between the chrome and blue paint is too irregular; I did it just with a brush without masking tape. Definitively not to my usual standard!

 

 

1031 Steering column.JPG

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Why the model is now in this strange position? Something to repair under the car? No, it’s just to keep the door open while I’m finishing the RH carpeting: as the check link is not yet installed, the door is closing itself which is very annoying to: keep the door open, hold the torch to illuminate the inside (a light colored carpet would solve this), push the finishing carpet into position and hold the glasses which are falling down when I’m trying to see something from the LH door aperture! At least, the last bit of the carpet on the right side is finished; the closing panel between the carpet and glove box is also installed. This side is ready, which is not yet the case on the other side.

The weight of the model right now: rear axle 1611g (56.8 oz); front axle 1044g (36.9 oz), total 2655g or 93.7 oz. When to front clip will be assembled, the front axle will much more heavier, the model near 3kg or more than 100 ounces.

 

1032 strange position.JPG

1033 RH carpet ready.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
wrong word (see edit history)
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Roger, With that kind of weight you really should use jack stands for your safety.  And where are you going to find a creeper small enough to get you under the car to work on it? I guess you will just have to make one. :lol:

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11 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Roger, With that kind of weight you really should use jack stands for your safety.  And where are you going to find a creeper small enough to get you under the car to work on it? I guess you will just have to make one. :lol:

You are right, but I was indeed inside the car! (at least the fingers…) To make a creeper would not be a problem, after the jack! Have a look at the picture: here, I went under the car to measure details of the frame and floor; I was not very confident about the situation!

 

To zipdang: indeed the car could not move as boxes and floor are horizontal; the wheels are just at a different altitude. The creeper is there to avoid a movement when I'm pushing on the floor!

good attitude.JPG

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Oh! The risk was well calculated: the owner of the car lifted it with an overhead crane. The picture is showing one of both hooks; the long jack stands on the previous picture were indeed just for show because if the overhead crane would have a problem, those jack stands would have collapsed.

He is doing since years the maintenance from his car with the same system!

DSC02782.JPG

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7 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

 

Safety first

 

 

You are right, but I was indeed inside the car! (at least the fingers…) To make a creeper would not be a problem, after the jack! Have a look at the picture: here, I went under the car to measure details of the frame and floor; I was not very confident about the situation!

 

To zipdang: indeed the car could not move as boxes and floor are horizontal; the wheels are just at a different altitude. The creeper is there to avoid a movement when I'm pushing on the floor!

good attitude.JPG

 

Jacked Up 1919 (1024x729).jpg

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Mostly after each step, I’m checking if the electrical functions are still up to my expectation. Recently, I saw that the LH quarter window had difficulties to go up and down, like a poor contact. Before I’m installing the LH door, I wanted to be sure if the missing electric wires from the LH door would change the situation: it was not. However, I discovered that both vent windows were moving when I wanted to operate the RH one from the driver’s door. No problem with the LH one, not with the RH vent window when operated from the RH door. Another gremlin to chase!

I removed the LH door armrest to check the wiring. Effectively, one wire was soldered at the wrong place! I did many checks before, but never when all was connected together. Once the wire was soldered at the right place, the operating of the vent windows was correct.

By applying current directly to the LH quarter window’s motor, the window went up and down without problem, but not with the switch. There was one solution: to remove the LH arm rest to check the switch. For that, I had to remove the seat back which after some weeks in place was sticking. I managed to damage the RH arm rest’s leather, I was very happy!

The contacts (not easy to remove when the wiring is attached) from the LH arm rest were OK, but I still had a problem with the window. In between, I removed the damaged RH arm rest to redo the leather. I checked the switch; I had the impression that one of the blades was still making contact. Indeed, now the LH quarter window went up and down without problem!

Finally, both arm rests are back again and the windows are OK. Without the damaged leather, I would not have found the problem. Ah! the joy of electricity!

 

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Sometimes things are going well, eh, almost. I had fears to install the steering column because the screws attaching it to the dash are pointing towards the floor and the heads are almost invisible. By putting the model on its side, the situation was not so bad. Once the steering shaft was inserted into the steering box, the assembly was rather stable and I could install the supporting bracket without too many difficulties and without damaging the paint. All is good? Well, not exactly: when the wheels were positioned for a straight drive, the steering wheel was wrong by 180°. At first, I wanted to let it that way, but I did not like that idea. To remove the column was out of question; I tried to remove the steering wheel inside. Finally, I could turn it a half turn and now it’s the way it should. The movement from the wheel to the steering shaft is done with a tiny steel screw. Obviously, this screw will break if too much effort is required. As it’s not a toy and will be seldom “used”, I can live with that.

And now? Another fear: soldering the wires from the LH door to the board seen on the picture…Anyway, the number of parts lying in the display cabinet is slowly diminishing!

 

1034 Installed steering column.JPG

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