Bud Tierney

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Everything posted by Bud Tierney

  1. Yes, such accidents are tragic, but I agree there's only so much you can protect people from... I knew a woman, usually normal, who delighted in engaging in intimacies in the front seat while her husband was driving down the highway in a motor home or pickup pulling a travel trailer. They never came to grief, but talk about distracted driving... There's nothing you can do for people that take crazy risks for the thrill or just because someone with more sense said they shouldn't...
  2. Can't tell, no picture of gasket (unusual) does note is solid head 6cyl, doesn't mention 4
  3. Sorry, got interrupted again... Can tell you what other Contl's it shares piston assembly, valve assembly and bearings with if you're looking for parts...tlater catalogs just lists 6... Can relate various other makes using the 6 if you want to contact other owners...looks like almost 30, and that's certain to be a partial list...the 4cyl version may've gotten into more trucks than the 6 got into cars...... Have no ovhl fits/clearances or performance graphs...
  4. Thought it was unusual two 7Ns'd show up at once, but the, it was a very popular engine...
  5. Just ran 7N for another thread (?/) No time to reply now, will reply later PM. Very popular engine, apparently unusual as Cont'l seems to've issued it as both 4 and 6, both designated 7n.
  6. CORRECTION??---that 7N 31/2 bore may've been issued BOTH as a 4 and a 6--- Out of curiosity eyeballed a 25 catalog, which listed the 7N 6cyl in a raft of cars, but listed the 7N as a four in MOST of the truck makes, with three trucks listing it as a 6...(not a complete list) While I haven't reviewed a 1924 catalog, its Cont'l engines list lists the 7N as both a four and six, which seems to verify the 1925 catalog listings...needs more work At any rate, it seems to've been quite popular in both 4 and 6, if there really were 4s aand 6s... and also should've advised starting a new thread (new inquiry on this engine)---here you're tacked onto an old thread that very few will see.
  7. Re' water in oil---you didn't say if you drained oil, drove it, watching oil carefully and then got water in oil again, and, if so, how much water how quickly,all of which''d allow more precise comments...as it is, it could be simply fixed (driving more to stop condensation), or frightening (cracks somewhere)... If you can see the water in the radiator going down while the water in the pan rises, you have real problems...
  8. If its a 6 it's almost certainly a 7N, which doesn't show in a 1917 ring catalog but does in later catalogs... It seems to share piston assemblies with a dozen other Cont'ls, valves with a few and bearings with a few more per a 36 engine parts catalog, if you're looking for engine parts...(can advise if needed A1930 gasket catalog which usually lists makes using Cont'ls omits that info for the 7 N and severa lsister engines...
  9. Just as an aside, if you're going to run a factory dual rig on single rears, I'd suggest using the outers instead, as the wheel cant gives you a few more inches of track width vs vertical height, which can be critical on curves when your oxy/acetyline bottles roll around in the bed... Don't ask how I learned this...
  10. While never a Packard owner, I dont recall any shop comments about any being weak in the battary system... It's true that if you're put-putting around town at night, lights on, radio going, heater on high, the generator might not keep up ,but a good battery should cover relatively short overloads...Before spending a lot of money, be sure the generators up to snuff, your wirings not deteriorated and your battery has ample capacity and''s in good shape. More detail re' how the generator doesn't 'keep up" ---when/how it occurs, driving environment etc might be helpful...
  11. A few more of interest... 1906 Stoddard-Dayton Rtbr 41/2x5 First National gasoline car, probably their 1906 "D" 35-40 HP Lexington, Grout and Westcott---all show both the 318 and 354 in CCDB 1911 Davis 50 listed 43/4x5; their 35 could be the 41/2x5... The Lauth/ Lauth-Juergens truck with rtbr 41/2x5... And more buried in my scribbling---I would assume dozens more with careful review of the trade journals and annual specs lists, seeing as how several references described Rutenber as one of, if not THE most populat engines of their day...over and out. OOPS rutenber 4s 4x4=201.6; 41/4x5=283.73; 41/2x5=318.09; 43/4x5=354.4
  12. Well, it's now PM (I'm no longer an early riser)... Looks like Lambert a good bet; all 4s with 28-40HP (Std Cat) model H with 41/2x5 in 1907 Halladay also big Rurenber user, using the 43/4x5at 35-40 HP in 1907 along with smaller 4... Jewel ditto; "40" was 43/4x5, the 20-40 Hp could be the 41/2x5... Try Pennsylvania 07-11; 1907 model listed with 41/2x5 Rutenber... also Glide 06-07; larger was the 43/4, smaller may be yours... 1907 Viking had 40HP Rutenber 41/2x5 (??).. Continental 07-08 used the 43/4 "U" but also had 25 and 30 HP models... A1908 Lambert truck is listed with a 41/2x5 35-40 HP, BUT Mroz's Truck Ency sez Lambert trucks had own engines 'till 1911 or so??... There're a few more oddballs but need to winkle them out from scribbled notes... Easiest way I know to check these us to run them thru classiccarsatabase etc to check engine listings to see if CID matches...all the above were references to makes/models using Rutenbers. in old trade journals.....
  13. Always fascinating to try to discover what other collectors my be running your engine... Std Cat shows at least two 4s for Auburn 1910, a 25-30 HP and a 35-40 HP.; a 1909 Rutenbur as lists the 41/2x5 as 30-35 HP and the 43/4x5 as 40-45 HP so we don't have exact matches, but HP is variable... Research is complicated by both these two fours being also issued as 6s, apparently under the same engine designation---"RA" for the 41/2 x5 and "U" for the 43/4x5... Whether both were separates or pairs i didn't note.. Unfortunately, these letter designations were hardly ever noted in writeups. Per Tutenbur ads both 4s were available in 1907and 1911, but were not in a 1914 ad (I'm sure there were numerous engine ads between 1911 and 1914) Both 4s were also available as marine engines, one reference stating the 41/2x5 was the most popular, but both apparently successful in their classes/categories, including racing. Just noticed past my bedtime here; will pick our some probable makes to consider and post in in the AM.
  14. Std Cat's pic implies it was part of company literature or local news writ-up ( possible but unlikely national trade journal write-up??))...if anything exists with any size specs, enough to feed into computer for generation of enough additional size specs for a respectable copy ??? Tried local newspaper, archives (includes any THEN local paper now defunct, which could be in Pub Lib newspaper archives) , local Pub Lib Business/Commercial literature collections, local Historical Societies, ,local Quinsler family members for dusty old packages of papers??? Would be fascinatihg hunt...is the game afoot???
  15. Granted, that this forum is technically correct for your inquiry, I would suggest it should also be in the horseless carriage (pre-1916) forum here as well,. That forum would have a concentration of followers more likely to be familiar with the Aster, which did seem to be quite popular in its day... If you have time to spend, you might pore through the annual thumbnails of new cars published in the trade journals of the day (and often now online). While seldom then mentioning the engine makers name for domestics, they were more likely to mention foreign sourced designs like the Aster. Such makes could have existing clubs or collectors groups.
  16. Std Cat has a liirle more (sorry I can't post)---primarily a carraige builder and possibly body builder for others, their car was produced in 1904 only... Auto'ble Qtly's 5000 Marques lists Quinsler as a m'f'r (rather than under its supplemental list of possible m'f'rs or one-off types); that listing is immediatly followed by "Quinsley 1904", no address, as an "unsubstantiated make"", so it's possible the vehicle was also known or referred to somewhere as a Quinsley...
  17. 8E4SE...many late thxx for the tip---they're even in my price range!! Will make space for one.
  18. Have you Googled the existing filter m'f'r's---Wix etc---they generally have their catalogs online now, and should have a search option for existing replacement---failing that, should have by size list online to match with yours......
  19. That particular generator isn't familiar, bit i rember (vaguely) using a carbide generator in which we put so much granular material and so much water, generating carbide...but what i remember clearly is the resulting sludge, diluted with water, , made the most blinding white paint imaginable that stood up beautifully to the southern NM sun...
  20. As I don't know your experience/background, this may be belaboring the obvious: The Dort seems to've been an "assembled" car, and, assuming the Canadian Gray-Dort was also, you may be limiting tour search unnecessarily as to mechanical parts... The chances are excellent that most, if not all, the mechanical parts were from "vendors" (outside suppliers who specialized in various mechanical parts) and were also used in various other makes of the period...the tricky part is identifying the various suppliers and their own ID numbers, etc;---once you have that, old parts catalogs can sometimes be consulted to determine how many other makes the part/s you need went into, as well as older interchange manuals .. I only have engine parts catalogs, and they list various 1923 US models with 4Cyl Lyc K and Hersh-Splmn 7000 motors, and a Falls 6Cyl T-8000 engine; Canadian models may not have the same parts as the US produced models, just to make it more difficult... Let us know what specific parts you're looking/praying for, and if you know which engine you have... As above, my apologies if this old, unwelcome news.....
  21. I'm not familiar with Dennis's Ency; I'll have to Google it... Mroz agrees as to the Los Angeles Barker, but is a bit different as to the Norwalk Barker... Doesn't mention original chain drive, says "several" models produced from 1/2 to 5 Tons, states their "wide model range" did not sell well. that in 1914 only the "lightest" (???) model was produced with the new worm drive, and the 2T with 137 WB came out in 1915... Mroz's terminology leaves uncertain whether he meant the 2T was worm drive...... The 'bible" of old trucks, generally considered the most thorough, has been Georgano's World Truck Ency, his Big Book (not to be confused with his "little book" which is names, addresses, years and capcities/types) which I've never been willing to write a check for, but if you're anywhere near a good public library they should have a reference copy... Should the chassis be there , and not fit anything mentioned, the trade journals (The Comm'l Vehicle, Comm'l Car Journal, The Motor Truck, Power wagon, etc) usually published annual specs lists which might list some Barker models...or might mot, as, as memtioned above, many of the se "assembled" trucks were quite local and not interested in National listings...and I find no Barker truck listings in my old parts catalogs covering their period... Sometimes I think Reference authors/publishers make special efforts to be a little differnt just to spur sales
  22. Gasket catalogs list a Lyc 8 AE-AEC-AED=AEF 33/4x43/4, and listed with it is UE-UED Marine, same b/s...looks like the marine versions have some ot their own part numbers, UE-, as surmised above (AE- for the others, some apparently shared) ...
  23. While I didn't read the whole link. my understanding's been that m'r's have been tracking driving for some time via the VIN tag in the windshield, for warranty purposes---drive abuseivly and maybe have warranty problems... Jack: join the club...no matter what I research online, I get pop=ups fro that item or product for anywhere from a wekl to a month after...
  24. Mroz lists two Barker trucks... 1911-13 in North LA Calif, no company name listed;; no delivery units mentioned (often car sized)...this may be The Barker Motor Truck Co, lLos Angeles, sted as a m'f'r that that announced a truck but questionable as to if ever actually produced per Auto'ble Qtly...Georgano's little book lists this as Barker Motors Co... The C. L Barker Co in Norwalk, Conn, 1912-17. did produce 1/2 tons and other models; m'f'r sometimes listed as just C. L. Barker...
  25. That 1.224 pin confuses things... My 36 King Prod manual shows two pistons about your size, used in both the cars and trucks... One for 1918-20 F18, J18, K18, T4, T18, U4 and U18 cars, and same year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T truck Specs 41/8 diam, 23/8 Comp dist, 451/64 length (4.75=48/64 pin diam 1.224...... The other is for 1913-18 R, S, R5, S5 cars and came year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T trucks...those specs go 41/8, 23/8, 451/64, but pin diam id 1.234 If those two pistons are interchangeable, you might have the later pistons...or the manual might be off... Now, under Reo truck there's also the 31-32 6 cyl 4J, 4K, 4T, 4Ton trucks using a Buda K381 engine, whose piston specs are 41/8, 21/4 and 43/8=428/64... Unfortunately, the K381 doesn't seem to've been that popular...