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Bud Tierney

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Everything posted by Bud Tierney

  1. As to you original questions, the answer would be insufficient data... While it would be a tragedy to scrap whats visible (front axle, springs, steering, etc) appeal and interest would be much greater if engine/trans there and in what condition (carb, ign, plugs in cyls, or block with head off/hole in block) stuff like that... None of this is meant to diminish the thanks all old car obsessive's owe you for taking the time and effort to post this here; too many wanted and needed pieces go to scrap simply because those searching for parts never heard about them. Presumably HET cl
  2. Well, Mroz was partially right, and my old catalogs again "incomplete"... The 1921 announcement of their 1T did specify Cont'l, but the 1922 anouncement of their 2T described their own 4x5 38HP 4cyl; if that asn't bad enough, the 2T has a Ruggles designed rear axle, which might further complicate restoration... While both my 30 McCord and 38 Victor gasket catalogs list Ruggles trucks with various vendor engines, neither lists any Ruggles motor, which apparently was only used in 1921?/1922 and maybe early 1923...some parts, not listed in the catalogs, were sometimes available on speci
  3. Here's an odd point---Mroz's Ency---which is generally reliable---says Ruggles built it's own 4 cyl engine in 1921-22, only switching to vendor engines in 1923... But the 3-4 old catalogs I checked all showed a mix of vendor engines from 1920 on, nothing listed for "own"... You sometimes womder how these managed to escape all the scrap metal drives and thr later ups of scrap prices... Per Mroz Ruggles was president of Republic Truck 1917-20...
  4. How are you measuring your mileage?? Granted 10 is low, but remember these cars only got their "customary" mileage running at normal speeds on generally smooth level highway in clear weather conditions... Anytime you ran in short trips, or in-town traffic, your mileage fell , sometimes drastically, if you spent time in going thru the gears to the next stoplight, and if the engine's been idling/running while you tinkered, that consumes gas too..... Do lpok at the plugs, as mentioned above...
  5. I'm inclined to go with those suggesting exhaust getting into the cooling... Had a Chev Cavalier the same---regular running around town or in semi-country/suburban area was fine; get stuck in heavy traffic it heated and would go into the red if couldn't get going or park to cool. Uphill, any load, same thing: watch it slowly heat....Running fan on defrost slowed heating but couldn't prevent it. Don't recall ever adding any coolant, ran ir like that for a year or so, and no visible exhaust when starting or running.
  6. From my old shade tree mechanic days "tight" engines were normal, to the point I've seen some that had to be towed to get them started...but those weren't Classic Car Type engines but well worn beaters/drivers being (hopefull0 temporarily rehabilitated... I'd be inclined to raise an eyebrow at a professional shop dealing with rare/expensive engines that turned them out so tight they had serious starting problems; I'd expect the shop to run them in" a bit themselves if it couldn't be avoided... You might ask the shop what king of voltage they used when the engine started normall
  7. Noted everything is "like new'... If your cap is old, and you haven't already done so, examine it carefully for: minute cracks or deposits that could bleed off spark intensity... clean contact surfaces on both the top and underside of the cap.. clean contact surface on the rotor...
  8. Many early issues of The Automobile and many other automotive trade magazines/journals are available free full view, up to 1922/23 on hathitrust... NOTE: they've recently changed their viewing format, and, for me at least, it's much slower, more cumbersome and irritating than their old system, which had been a delight to use...but, that being said, still free and invaluable, so I should be complimenting their efforts rather than complaining...
  9. I know nothing about these engines, nor do I particularly care to, being unable to keep up with those I am interested in... That being said, on 7-14 you stated you intended to contact the HCVS in the UK, which one would assume could/would tell you all you needed/wanted to know about your engine... So, what happened?? My experience with the HCVS/UK is limited to help with one US engine ID problem some years ago, but I recall them as being both gracious and appreciative, a pleasure to engage with......
  10. Even assuming the 192os tire technology was more primitive, so were most of the roads...you're naturally going to get more miles if you're on relatively smooth pavement than if you're regularly on gravel, etc... And tire technology is almost always a compromise between traction and mileage, altho the last NHTSA? report I saw, several tears ago, did list some high end tires with excellent traction AND mileage... so a particular m'f'r's model X might be high on traction, but their model Y better on mileage... Then (sigh) there're drivers like my brother, who generally had either the ga
  11. Haven't been in yesterdays tractors (ytmag.com) for some time; their stationary forum was minor, but am surprised no replies as remewmber thwm as very helpful/sypathitic... Can heartily recommend smokstak forum for your engines; give them a try...engine history, advice, parts, sympathy, as the case may be...
  12. Without impugning your seller personally, whenever a car for sale has a few "minor" little things wrong, that (theoretically) would be easily (cheaply) fixed, I always wonder why the seller didn't get them fixed so he could sell a clean "ready-to-go" car??? Geez, the more i think of this...the transmission (a possible quagmire, as noted) and the battery drain (worse from a labor time tracking it down viewpoint) are bad enough, but he LEFT windshield wiper out?? He only drove it on dry days?? Sounds like something serious under the dash, frightening...
  13. Will some helpful soul save me some time?? Std cat sez Auburn used some Rutenber engines in some of their 1910-17 30 to 40+ Hp models... Was one of them a 43/4x5--354.4 engine?? Many thxx for enlightenment...
  14. Have to give up for now , but it does seem this engine was fairly well used in cars; didn't verify any trucks and never got to marine. Too many questions, too little time.
  15. RO: So far i have almost 60 names on my Rutenber list, including that Wiki list, altho not all verified. Rutenber himself left the company, the new owners reorganizing and renaming the company Rutenber Mtr Co to retain the reputation. After being passed around, probably in financial deals, they were absorbed by/became a part of/merged/were engulfed by??? Indiana Truck (it's confused; I never took the time to pin it all down)... That Lexington motor may well be our 43/4x5, as classic car database has a 354 for the "A" and "B" series, which're in the right timeline... Somewhere in my
  16. While I'm not really into the old horizontal-opposed (flat) 2 and 4 Cyl auto etc engines, I 've noted that, generally, their bore is larger than their stroke...while almost all inlines are tho opposite: their bore is smaller than their stroke..(a few "square", and even fewer "oversquare" inlines are out there, but they're unusual and rare)... Is/Was there some technological reason/s for this difference??
  17. WHAT A GOOF---THAT'S 43/4x5...another senior moment... Many thxx for comments... So far the Clark seems to've had a smaller Rutenber (41/2x5=318) one of their then advertised sizes... However, the Glide did use the 354 engine in several models; or appears to, the b/s matching... GROAN--(edited)--another goof---half marked off Clark until thought this AM to finish checking--right there in Std Cat, which should be first check, are 30HP fou and 40HP four---the 40 could well've been our 43/4x5, often listed as 40-45 HP (I think one source said it could develop 50)...
  18. Rutenber was an old-time once quite successful engine builder; auto, launch, stationary per old ads... One model was their 4cyl 43/4x5 (354.4) offered to the trade in the pre-teen and teen years; used in the 2T and 3T, and some of the 5T Avery Farm and City Tractor models (a combination farm tractor/road truck) now avidly sought by collectors, I wondered, as idle curiosity, what else this engine may've gone into... The Jewel advertised this engine, but it was quite short lived... Does anyone here know of, or have , a list of the early cars/trucks/boat builders that used Rutenbe
  19. A good charged up 6V battery should run and start the average midsize 6 cyl inline easily normally, several times a day, even without ANY generating, unless you're running lights, heater and radio full blast, OR unless you/ve got a big heavy V8.. I know this because I've run these on nightly battery chargups when I couldn't come up with he money for generator work until next payday (and maybe not then)...just get home before full dark... If a big V8, as mentioned in earlier posts above, hot hard starts are not unusual when everything's not tip=top, and sometimes even then...my brothe
  20. Catalogs are spotty on this; only a few mention the Austin engine/s?? 33 Perf Circle rings--1933---Austin 2.2--4 5/32 oil rings, 8 comp, no size given 34 Hastings Flat Rate---1933--Austin 2.2--4 5/32 oil, 8 5/32 comp 1934--Austin-Stutz 2.2--4 1/8 oil, 8 3/32 comp 1946 McQ-Norris---1934/35, all models---Austin 375, 475 engines, 2.2---4 1/8 oil, 8 3/32 comp 1949 Hastings--1933 models A, B, 16--Austin 2.2-- 1934/35 models A, B, 16, 18----tAustin-Stutz 2.2---this catalog only gives ring groove sizes, seems
  21. Don't know if Cont'l timing marks more or less same on all engines, or if differ per engine.... If differ might help to know which engine you have (my old catalogs differ on 28 6cyls)...9L?? 9LA?? 14L?? 15L?? or ??
  22. There's also aths.com , justoldtrucks (these two are heavily into more modern stuff, but there are older truck collectors there) and the Antique Cars/Trucks forum on smokstak...it would be nice if it could be saved,,,
  23. If you've posirively ID'd the engine as some Cont'l, it's almost certainly a replacement for an original K-S in-house built engine, introduced in 1912 per Mroz's Ency, which states proprietary engines were not introduced until 1925 (one of the K=S engines was used until 1929, when the company died)... OOPS...are you sure about your date?? Tad's truck spotters guide shows the K-S as a shovel=nose (radiator behind engine) until 1924; the pic above looks very much like his illus for 25-28...maybe meant 1926 instead of 1916??
  24. If you're still looking for NOS/NORS a 36 King catalog says your 6E shares piston assemblies with Cont'ls 6M, 8R and 2P...the 8R being a popular engine (in lots of makes)...
  25. I do hope you're not recycling the originals...our "forever" internet is only "forever" as long as the correct technology is there to retrieve it, and the correct power to run the technology...and someone cares enough to transfer it to a new technology...
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