Bud Tierney

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Bud Tierney last won the day on October 12 2015

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About Bud Tierney

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    pitybud@q.com

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    Portland, OR
  • Interests:
    Presently---which US proprietary engines (Buda, Cont, Erd/Chief, Herc, Milwaukee, etc) ...got into which US car/truck makes

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  1. Well, made the mistake of eyeballing another catalog... Seems Elcar also used the WR and WT in addition to those above, and Kissel also used the WR ... Penetration was better among trucks.. .Amer LaFrance---WTG Atterbury---WRG, WTG Corbitt---WF, WFC Grass-Premier---WTG LaFrance-Republic---WRG, WTG Republic---WRG Stewart---WR, WRG, WS, WTG World---WTG While not a very promising list, keep in mind these catalog listings are far from complete;
  2. Many thxx for enlightenment re' Auburn commonality, or, more accurately, the lack thereof..... Per the 38 Victor and a 63 McCord, (not to be considered complete) Elcar used the W and WS, Gardner used the WR and Ws (WR was not in the 38 Vic, the 50 Fitz or the 63 McC.; I assume same bore as WRG) and Kissel used W and ws. Unfortunately all generally desireable restoration units themselves. There was also a smattering of trucks; will advise later...
  3. Well, as usual, couldn't leave well enough alone---another catalog says should be WS... Both seem to be part of a series---W 21/4, WRG, WS, WSG 27/8, WTG 3" and WF, WFC 31/16 bores, all 43/4 stroke, so it's possible one superseded the other... .The series seems to share some gaskets; WF and WFC having a separate head gasket; the WF and WFC are carried in the Auburn section in my 38 Victor, rather than lumped in with the others in the Lycoming section in my 50 Fitz. I'm sure the Club can advise if any blocks/engines interchangeable; none of the Ws seem to've been all that popular engines per makes penetration, but I have no actual production numbers......
  4. You might also consider a couple other things: (1) identify your engine in your posts---per one of my old catalogs it should be a Lycoming WF (repeat, should). This's in case Lyc also sold that engine to other m'f''r''s, whose models may be the same engine or same block... (2) check with the ACD people whether they already know of any other makes using the engine or a close enough version blocks or complete engines may drop in if available WFs are out of reach for some reason......
  5. Howard---(Sigh) I can't bring up whatever site I was in re' the 8---it had the same pic as your original second pic, and the text had the comment re' two sixes linked----as I rememeber the format, it could've been theoldmotor, but searching in that site brings up other Maxwell pages but not the one I remember... You're correct the two 4s were joined by a common crankcase; there's a clear pic in The Automobile, 8-23-06 pg 229, which matches the squib abour the 8 being down with busted crankcase... Most likely the writer saying the two fours were "back to back" should've said "end to end" to be clearer... But, maddeningly, none of the other writeups of the 12 I saw mention smaller engines linked, not even an Automobile piece that first described the 8 as if it was one piece (which, in a sense, it was) and in the next sentence said that, practically, it was the joining of two fours, then went on to talk about the 12 as if it was one piece...(another common crankcase??)... It's doubtful they' developed a six just for the race; I don't have enough experience with this old stuff to know what I'm looking at, but it's certainly logical they'd use engines they'd had long experience with (the 4s used in the eight were described as their large car engine, somewhat tweaked for the race).. It's been fun, but I'm bowing out; I just wanted to be sure the 8 wasn't some early quasi-V8, and then got enmeshed in all this...
  6. One of the Google hits under Maxwell and Vanderbilt Cup stated the 8 was two 4s linked "back to back" with a front radiator for the front engine and a second radiator just in front of the driver/mechanic's seats for the rear engine... (the 12 was also two sixes "linked"...)... That site's mechanic's side pic was clearer, and there didn't seem to be any front drive axle, so "back to back" would mean the engines rotated in opposite directions to drive thru the rear axle???? Oh, well, one down; on to Franklin's "long 8 cyl" which'll almost certainly be a couple more fours...
  7. A motorsports.com Franklin piece verifies the *"Long8" was a straight 8 of some kind...
  8. Had no idea a mystery was involved; assumed all these old well-known racers were all minutely described in racing history books... Looking thru earlier notes found "two fours" note but no source for reference. Am sorting thru period trade journals to flesh out my V8 list (idle curiosity) and will post anything I run across re' the Maxwell... Many thxx for reply!!...
  9. Jump-spark type plugs were available at one time for oil burners; as described above, they kept plugs firing in the oily combustion atmosphere that fouled a "standard gap" plug... We used to make our own, holding the wire just off contact with the plug/s...
  10. I don't follow Franklin, or race cars, so I'm hoping some kind soul will fill me in on "...Franklin's long 8 Cylinder" mentioned in a 1905 race car/race meet piece... Two fours together?? True straight 8?? Many thxx for enlightenment...
  11. I don't follow Maxwell, or race cars, so I'm hoping someone will be kind enough to fill me in on the 8 Cyl built as a possible Vanderbilt Cup car but not ready, apparently not run until some later meet... One reference referred to "twin motors", so I'm assuming that was two fours in line, or two fours driving one drive line (or each engine driving it's own axle?) rather than a true straight eight?? Many thxx for enlightenment...
  12. If you're not already aware of them, there 're (or were several years ago) bus collector/club websites...can no longer find them in my notes but should turn up on Google, if no luck here...
  13. We sold recaps at our gas station after the war, when that's all that was available... Scammers would pick up blowouts left along the highways, section/patch, recap and paint, but most were too shoddily done to not be obvious; with the better ones we sold, we gave people postcards, to let us know if it gave out before they got home (interstate drivers; tires sold on "it looks safe to us, but... basis)..some only got few hundred miles, surprising amount crossed county (NM to East/South)...some that looked good blew up weak spots or irregularities as soon as pressurized (all tubed then)... We all ran recaps; if done well on good carcass by reputable shop, as mentioned above, safe as houses, even on rough county roads...thrown recaps along highways were 99.9% heavy truck types...
  14. A question on scanning/copying copy longevity--- In years past, working with copying/copies of various types, some types of copies faded with time (or the ink dots separated from the paper?)... Are the present day copies permanent, or do they have a "shelf-life" dependent on use, time or light exposure?? My few 20-30 (40?) year old "Xerox" copies are in glassine/poly? sleeves and only see the light of day in an occasional use..