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  2. Good to see you still have your charming sense of humor! I’ve had more eBay buyers flake out than follow through. I don’t think I’ll be using eBay anymore.
  3. The ONLY way to get a quality forged piston & good rings is through myself. Tom T.
  4. Not saying ANYTHING bad about Falcon, but you have to watch what's supplied & the pistons will almost undoubtedly be Egge. Tom T.
  5. I want to add my thanks to the organizers, vendors and volunteers. I think it was a great event; well organized, well attended. Great week! Joe
  6. If you entered to be Judged you should get the FIRST JUNIOR AWARD and the Grill Junior Badge will be given to you shortly. It most likely comes in the mail, or call the HQ in Hershey to pick it up if you are near by. Same with the Trophy you will be given. Congratulations, to tell the truth a lot of us don't make it on the first try and chalk it up as a learning experience. Once the badge is on you grill, next year you will be entered for Senior which gets slightly harder as the total point deductions become greater. See if you had point deductions that you need to fix. After Senior the next step is the Grand National award which you need to be at 385 points to win. Find the entry list given to you at the entry gate in the large envelope and find your class and if your name and car are listed you should have a Green sheet that goes on the car and gets a sticker from the Judge after they finish that says "JUDGED". Only question you might have is, depending on the points, did you hit the mark, the don't tell you and you can't ask them. Also read the literature you got in advance from AACA that tells you how this all works. You'll get a letter in the near future, but remember there were hundreds of cars entered that AACA will need to have time to sort through. Last thing to mention is you can request from the AACA CHIEF JUDGE a copy of the judging sheet to see what needs fixing. Get to know the guys in your class and ask them to look your car over the morning of the Meets. We all help each other this way to get it right eventually. I think you can also down load the AACA Rules for more helpful information. Doug
  7. Unless you had documentation for a cogged belt as the type used it would get a deduction under the "type specified" clause I'd think. I'll be interested to see what those with more experience say. I don't see any reference to belts at all on the CCCA rules or handbook though. I don't have any experience with them so I may be looking in the wrong area. When did they come out? I know they had toothed timing belts back in the day but I don't know anything about early toothed/cogged v belts and the internet is letting me down in searches.
  8. Welcome aboard, Tony! That is a WONDERFUL little wagon you've got there!
  9. All 1956 and earlier Crown Imperials were built /bodies by Chrysler Corporation. The very few exceptions being special orders that included custom modifications. In almost every case, Derham Coachworks, Rosemont, PA, was the go-to specialty shop for this work. In '56 Derham did two such orders for individuals (I own one). In '55 Derham converted three and all were for the Eisenhowers. '54 and earlier can be internet researched including AACA who has the photo files donated by a Derham heir. 1957- 1965 Crown Imperials were exclusively built by Ghia in Turin, Italy. For '57-59 LeBaron coupes were sent over in partial assembly for Ghia to stretch the chassis and bodywork and add their custom coachcloth interiors. 1960-65 saw LeBaron 4dr sedans sent over to start the process. Your intentions for the AACA library are EXCELLENT. Memphian and Armbruster /Stageway were not given direct contracts from Chrysler for conversions. Their work was as private contractors building a class of cars generally referred to as "airporters" referring to very long stretch, multi-door sedan conversions, mostly of entry level models for use transporting volumes of passengers for airports, hotels, and some for military bases. Memphian's specialty was usually ambulances and hearses and they built on any brand chassis you wanted.
  10. From my neighborhood today on Pender Island BC , Canada.
  11. So the car is back and I can find nothing seriously wrong with it, although there was a large puddle of what appeared to be red anti-freeze under it on the trailer. It seems that they drained out the 50/50 mix that we put in it and filled it with straight anti-freeze, possibly because he was freaking out over the engine overheating (it wasn't, but the faulty gauge said it was hot so he panicked). I'm guessing the same idiot mechanic who told him his Studebaker had to have catalytic converters (and charged him $8000 to install them) also told him to put straight anti-freeze in it to cure the problem. It won't, it will run hotter. Anti-freeze is not nearly as good as water at transferring heat in the radiator. This would explain why it would act up on hot days and in rush hour traffic. The other stuff is probably explained by a guy not knowing anything about cars or chokes or anything else. Nevertheless, it started right up and idled nicely coming off the trailer. I took it on a test drive and seemed fine. Ran it up to about 60 MPH and there was a bit of a stumble when I stepped into it at high speeds, so we'll look into that. I suspect the mechanical fuel pump is a little weak and it isn't delivering at high speeds or in hot weather. As long as it's here, I'm going to add an electric pump and replace the temperature gauge sending units. I suppose I should drain and flush the cooling system. Again. So I'll spend a large-ish pile of money, plus $1600 worth of shipping, to fix non-issues that would be simple and cheap to fix locally if he would just find an honest mechanic. He insists his "guy" is "the best" but anyone recommending 100% anti-freeze and installing catalytic converters on pre-1975 cars is a moron, not "the best." This is what people do to old cars. Think about it next time you're buying a car standing in some fool's driveway.
  12. That is correct Bill & what I normally use. They require 1/2 the voltage to fire. Are a Multi Hear Range plug that adjusts itself automatically. VERY resistant to fouling & last just about forever in our applications. Tom T.
  13. I have over 20,000 classic car ads from Acme to Zimmerman: years range from 1897 to the early/mid 60's. 132+ car manufacturers, 50 + trucks manufacturers. Stared collecting car, truck, gas, oil, etc.. ads in 1973. I really enjoy the old hand drawn ads and stopped collecting ads when photographs were being used in the early 60's. Had the ads and when computers came about and scanner I started scanning in the ads but threw away the actual ads. This was before Ebay came about so I only have maybe 50 of the ads left. I have about 5000 posted to my website and just trying to find the time to post more but if there is a special make and year you need, just ask and I'll see what I can find. http://www.realclassicads.com Fred Melbourne FL USMC Retired
  14. And if Johns (keiser31) is not what you want, I have the Nickle plated 1931 Plymouth PA Freewheeling knob and cable
  15. Mars

    1930 cf fuse size

    Still blowing fuses. Replaced a few wires that looked real bad. I feel like a pretzel from being under the dash. It shouldn't be this hard.
  16. Posted by BearsFan315: If I had seen those slide rules, I probably would have bought one. In high school, I helped with Math tutoring. I taught people how to use slide rules using one of those giant ones that hung over a classroom blackboard!
  17. Sounds like a seized bearing inside the generator. Does it still turn? There are a couple of oiling cups, one on each end of the generator. Supposed to give them a couple drops of oil every time you do an oil change. The previous owner may not have been very diligent about that. Wonderful, rare little wagon. Pete Phillips, BCA #7338 Leonard, Texas
  18. Fantastic! As a vendor, was one of my better shows met new and old friends being buyers of past and many of my AACA forum friends stopped by for a quick Hello, I did not get away much but people traffic was a mob then a breather then a mob. Great weather and had our friends from other countries they come along way to keep the hobby and Preservation of the Antique Automoble alive from abroad and they spend a bunch just to get here from places they told me like Poland, Norway, Sweeden, Great Britan, Austrailia, New Zealand, Spain, Netherlands, Mexico Overall Thank you to all staff and first responders,and volunteers.Thanks!
  19. Two new old stock front fender side moldings for 1946-48 Super and Roadmaster, one still in the original wrapper with part # on it, and a new torque ball bushing (hard to find and almost all of them need it), $60 for all three. I flew up to Pennsylvania, so I was limited in what I could bring back! Came back with a suitcase full of parts and literature. Pete Phillips, BCA #7338
  20. Does anyone have some sales examples to verify that custom-bodied Packards are still doing well? Our local member's Classics include, I know, a dashing 1934 salon model (pictured) and things that aren't so ordinary, yet he surprised me by saying that the top end is hurting too. He said the difference in the last 5 to 10 years is remarkable. Another local man, just a couple of years ago, bought a Marmon V-16 convertible. It was at Hershey in 2017. This part of Penna. is full of people with interesting cars, yet in our well-populated AACA region those collectors are a little bit fewer every year, sorry to say. That might explain the statement that there is currently a surplus of cars on the market.
  21. Following up here on some of the responses... * I live near the coast so ac isn’t required but would be nice to have an option to add it as a project * I want to emphasis the need for a daily driver - not something I’ll be keeping stored in a garage all the time * For this reason, I don’t want something that has such a nice paint job that I’ll be worried about keeping it cleaned all the time - cars with patina or older paint job are a-ok with me * I absolutely must have a vehicle that can handle street driving but will also handle the occasional trip on a highway where I need to keep up with traffic at 65-75mph (sadly, I think this will rule out options like the Model A) * I prefer a larger vehicle that I can use for occasionally transferring music instruments or the occasional trip to Home Depot for supplies Great point regarding limited rear-view in 40s vehicles. Is there a Ford Deluxe option or replica or restomod that will work? I love this style of car and it’s size is very utilitarian for what I want. Ok let’s talk repairs. First and foremost, I need reliability in the sense that I want to enjoy my driving without always worrying if I’ll have to be inconvenienced by a breakdown. If that means I need to make an investment in the beginning to get it there, I’m happy to do so. Ongoing maintenance I do myself is also fine. I also don’t mind working on the car or making repairs as needed myself, but preferably, I’d be able to choose the pace and degree of repairs on my own terms, most of the time. Stuff always happens, even with newer cars so I don’t expect perfection. Recently, my Camry started shifting slowly and the check engine light came on. I got the codes checked and autozone said I needed a new intermediate speed sensor A. Ok so I called the Toyota parts house and they said there could be up to 4 of these sensors. They didn’t know which one was A. Oook. So I YouTubed and found a tutorial but they called the sensors NC and NT. Called Toyota again and they didn’t know what these acronyms meant or where they were located or how they related to sensor A vs B. In the end, there were two sensors located near each other - they were the exact same part. I order two from Amazon, replaced them and all was fine until ... The vehicle was idling very rough. Long story short, when you unplug the battery, you have to do some ignition key combination to get the Camry into a state to “relearn” the idle. Basically, there was a ton of misinformation and unknowns that made the process much less pleasurable even though in the end, the repair was physically easy to do and cost less than $50. I know very little about classic or older cars but I get the sense it might be easier to install a power steering conversion kit than it is to troubleshoot all of the modern electronics in my Camry. I’m open to the fact that maybe a classic car isn’t right. I just think the look of most newer vehicles are down right boring and plastic and cheap. I could care less about impressing others. I’m restoring my 1927 house, I love history and my personality is one that appreciates older things. Having a vehicle that matches who I am is icing on the cake. Hope this sheds more light. I’m grateful for all of your ideas and helping this layman expand his understanding.
  22. Myself I wouldn't buy ANYTHING from Egge. IF your lucky you may end up with 8-1 compression or less as their pistons are made to cover ALL variables. Not a good choice as most parts supplied are foreign cheapo stuff. They just fill the box with what they have available & can supply easily. For what it costs to build a "Nail" you want it to run at least as good as before you removed it. Same goes with machine shops who most ALWAYS apply SBC rebuilding techniques which don't work on a "Nail". Shop CAREFULLY for parts & a machine shop or you may end up to be one of those with ANOTHER horror story. Tom T.
  23. I have a completely restored, gorgeous 69 GS 400 for sale. Numbers matching, near perfect! Auto on the column. Asking $26,500.00. Located in Central Wisconsin Call or text for more info. 715-9three7-256zero You won't find one nicer! Thank you! John
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