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Rodney’s 1963 Buick Skylark convertible


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Hi all,

I thought I would introduce you to our “new” addition to the family, our 1963 Buick Skylark convertible.

 

With the all aluminium 215cu in (3.5litre) Buick 200HP V8, it has the dual path turbine drive 2 speed automatic, power steering, push button radio, two speed wipers with washers, clock and deluxe wheel covers.

 

Restored and sold in 2015, she was repainted in Arctic White, with a new white top and red interior, same colours as she came from the factory. Motor and transmission were also rebuilt with speedo reading just over 66,000 miles which could be original.


The previous elderly owner travelled all of 262miles in six years. From what I can gather, the LHD in Australia was probably an issue, plus he had other cars (Triumphs) to choose.

 

We have had it three days and are probably close to that mileage now! A few gremlins to sort out, but it runs smooth and strong with a nice exhaust note, shifts are good, ride is a soft Buick ride.

 

A little sister to our 1963 Buick Riviera

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21 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

Sweet biscuits!  Amazing how it looks similar in size to the Riviera while sitting  in the garage.   Looks like the chrome tailpipe extension has been moderated (thankfully)?


Hi John, thank you!

 

Was the first thing I did was to get rid of the boy racer extension. It now has one that is about the right size courtesy of the Riviera. Thankfully the Skylark is about 10” shorter than the Riviera (192.1” vs 208”) which means I can still access the garage from my workshop on the left. If the Skylark was any longer I would not be able to open the door which would be an issue. 🙃🙃🙃

 

Anyway had some fun time putting on the NOS Skylark badge on the LHF fender. It took all of sixty seconds to install the badge and about 4 hours to remove the headlamp assembly, add a Hella QH hi beam, replace a missing clip, change out some incorrect screws and repair a broken focus adjuster. But do it properly and do it once. Cleaned up all the stainless retaining rings and chrome brightwork around the lamps at the same time.

 

And today I did the same process less 60 seconds on the RHS however the focus adjusters were all good. However the fasteners in the die cast headlamp base were frozen ( nuts had seized on the studs) so with some heat off the Weber BBQ and dropping the studs in cold water, managed to get them loose. All back together and working.

 

While I was there, added an electronic HD flasher can which gives a better flash rate and is audible. Also took off the front park lamp lenses and gave them a clean. Someone had already replaced the globes and sockets, so that was all good. 
 

Lastly, replaced the loose number plate fasteners with some stainless steel studs and made them secure. Pictures later.
 

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And yesterday I had my own Buick car show. Won first prize in each category as well as Best in Show and People’s Choice award. Judges were a little biased, but there were no protests!

 

 

 

 

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I had sold Black Beauty so I could buy the Skylark and was waiting for the transport company to collect it.  So it was a once in a lifetime moment to get all three together.
 

He later rang to let me know he could not make it and would be there the next day. So she sat outside all night.
 

What was pleasing was that it started easily next morning and ran at a fast idle which was somewhat puzzling until it dawned on me that the auto choke was working as it should. While it was in the garage, it never got cold enough to activate it!

 

Anyway, just these two now to tell stories.

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Many happy miles with your Skylark!

 Delightful car to drive. My only experience was when our 63 Skylark coupe was my mother's daily driver to work. I got to use it on the weekends. I believe we owned it from 1968 untill I had an OOPS!! in 1972. I did about $300 damage when I rear-ended someone. His 1971 Dodge Dart required a $12.90 tail light. His bumper caught me in the grill. Fan into the radiator after the motor mounts broke! That totaled it out at the time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A few updates. We did our debut Coffee n Cars today (see post under “Hands up if you drove an old Buick today” and leaving at 6.45am with top down and temperature about 12-15 degrees Celsius we found out what convertible driving conditions are all about!

 

Skylark runs nice and is quite meagre on its Premium Unleaded 98. Have installed a full size battery, got the wipers working and Hi Beam warning light, radio light and one of the instrument illumination lights back working. Like most electrical problems it just takes some thorough cleaning of the terminals to see things bought back to life. Also got the two kick panel vents fixed correctly and another antenna to replace one that was broken. 
 

Next job is to work out the heater cable adjustment and water valve cable to get these functioning correctly. A few jobs ticked off the list, but still more to follow.

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And a few updates. We caught up with Kim, the gentleman who purchased the Skylark and imported it to Australia who was really pleased to see it on the road. When he bought it, it was a good solid car but had deteriorated some what due to little use and some neglect. It was not drivable when he bought it. 
 

Have had a few small victories with the installation of a correct size battery, a inside mirror that doesn’t flop, a high tension lead support and hopefully the fixing of a major oil leak. When the electric fuel pump was added they made up an aluminium plate to block the opening left by the mechanical pump. Found the plate was cocked and hitting at the top as it was too large and not sitting flush. Trimming the top slightly has fixed that. Added some thick washers to prevent the bolts bottoming out in the casting, which is what I thought the problem was. Road test will tell. 
 

Also had its first oil and filter change in who knows when along with a chassis lube. Located a loose idler arm support which I’m hoping is the cause of the low speed shake/shimmy which does disappear at faster speeds. That’s booked in to be changed along with a wheel balance, rotation and wheel alignment.

 

Speedo reading is now 66630 miles which means we have driven 477 since picking it up on 24th February. She now has a name “Happy” which is how I feel when I drive it. ( Her companion is Snow White).

 

Next job is to diagnose why headlamps not working and to add relays into the wiring to handle the QH sealed beams that are probably the culprit. And the heater fan and the auto choke and .......

 

Almost never ending, but all good fun. Loving it!

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

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17 hours ago, EmTee said:

Could be a scene from Mad Men -- it's 1963 again!  


Thank you! These share more than just garage space. So far oil filters and drain plug washers are common, might also start them on the same oil diet too!

 

Had a couple of good wins, dismantled and cleaned the headlamp switch and terminals to get it working again. So pleased that created a how to article for the Australian Buick Magazine. Will add some relays to the wiring circuit to enable it to handle the QH inserts. And found a nice radio with mounting escutcheons and mounting bracket and three Ventiports on eBay.
 

Sunday we did a local Victor Harbor Coffee n Cars in the morning with a great range of classics, hot rods and a few vintage. Only one Buick 😊😊😊

 

And being such a nice day for top down motoring, went out to the Fork Tree Brewery at Carrickalinga for lunch via the back roads. Jo (who is my official photographer) really excelled with this one.

 

So far we have clocked up 582 happy miles 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

So pleased that created a how to article for the Australian Buick Magazine.

 

Please consider submitting to Ray Knott for use in The Riview also.  I, for one, would appreciate that article!  The basic design of those switches was common across all GM products.

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17 hours ago, EmTee said:

 

Please consider submitting to Ray Knott for use in The Riview also.  I, for one, would appreciate that article!  The basic design of those switches was common across all GM products.


Will certainly do that, thank you for the reminder. If you wish to see a copy earlier I’m happy to send it by PM. Just let me know.

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀

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You realise that some things are best left to the professionals so had local mechanic, Steve replace the idler arm support bracket today. So glad I did as I would have never got it off!

 

While under there greased upper ball joints that I didn’t do and the centre slip joint on the tail shaft.  A check of the rest of the steering and front suspension found nothing that needed attention although the rusty shockers looked like they were from 1963.

 

And look what we found when checking the oil level for the rear axle!

 

Surprised that there was nothing on the ID plate listing the Positive Traction Differential unless it was owner installed later. I will do some research on the correct oil and about changing it. Steve agreed that would be good, he said it stinks and perhaps should be changed.

 

Steve is building a ‘56 Chevrolet 4 door sedan (Australian RHD build) into a hot rod and also has completed a 1971 HQ Holden Monaro sedan, so working on the Buick is not too far out of left field. He was surprised how small it was 😀😀
 

Road test revealed a vast improvement and hoping tomorrow’s wheel balance, rotation and alignment will resolve the low speed shake. Fingers crossed 🤞

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

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In 1969 GM positraction units required an oil change every so often (I think it was 15 k)  with a specially blended oil.  As I don't currently have such a unit I think there is an additive to regular rear axle oil that suffices.  However I do not know if that applies to 1963 posi units and if not, that original oil may smell horrible but what makes it smell  is good stuff.  I would recommend researching options before just changing that out due to smell.

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First day of driving with the top up as there was a tiny bit of rain, but booked in for wheel alignment at 8.30.

 

Balance and wear on both front tyres were good and wheel alignment was in specification so no alterations needed. It drives and steers smoothly and seems to improve as I drive it but might be getting used to it. A few rattles evident at the rear with top up, so will explore there.

 

Driving with top up is an experience, lot more road noise through the rear as there is no panel separating the cabin from the boot (trunk). But not much wind noise until you are at highway speeds.

 

Thinking I might change out all four shock absorbers to eliminate some of those rattles. Wipers did not want to cooperate at first, so used the washer button to get them to sweep. Then they decided to work on both speeds, go figure. Looks like another connection clean coming up. 
 

Pulling up to the local auto store, a fellow remarked that the headlights were flickering ( his RH tail lamps were out) so sitting here in the garage with the lights on as I write this. So far all is good, but relays happening soon.

 

Pics from today! 
Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

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Well, sitting in the garage with lights on was no test at all so I found out. Driving back home that night, lights were flicking on and off quite quickly as the thermal overload kicked in and out because of the QH headlamps. A bit scary where there are no street lights. So next day was to start on the relay project.
 

But before that, measured up for seatbelts front and rear. ‘63 was first year where manufacturers put in seat belt locations for factory or dealer installation. Found the outboard threaded holes but yet to find the inboard for the front. And as to the dimples in the rear floor, take your pick. After deliberating over the diagram in the manual,  opted for the two existing holes fitted with sealing plugs. Far as I know I will be able to access a nut and bolt there, whereas drilling other holes might be a disaster. With some heavy reinforcing plates, all will be fine. Belts on order 😀😀😀😀

 

Then onto the relay project! Set up four relays, one each side for HI and Lo with heavier wire for feeds and grounds. Power feed for LHS runs from positive stud connection on right to front then clips on the bonnet lock panel across to LHS. Used existing bolts and holes to mount relay holders. At same time was able to replace the broken headlamp aiming grommet that I had temporarily repaired and improve the fit of the Chineseum headlamps the PO had installed to stop a slight movement. Seems the locating lugs on the back of the glass that fit into the seat provide way too much lateral movement compared to an OEM unit. Thinking a set of Cibies might be on the list for Christmas.

 

And another small win was getting the heater motor to work by (you guessed it) plugging in the wire connector! I had overlooked this as had started to remove blower motor, which I intended to do regardless. After 46 years, figured a clean and oiling might help it run quietly for another 46. So that apart ready for assembly. Just got to workout how to hold the brushes and springs in when popping the armature back 🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔

 

These are only small wins, but for me, they are all helping to make the Skylark a nice reliable driver once more.

Rodney 😀😀😀😀

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

And managed to tidy up the chrome trim on the inside of the  RHF seat. (Her seat)

 

It needed a good polish, but on removing it found the retaining screw was screwed into thin air, what ever it was meant to fix in to was missing. Even after slitting the vinyl a short distance could not see anywhere it would fix to.
 

Made up a small rectangular metal washer that would squeeze the vinyl between it and the chrome trim. As you can see in the photo, the side chrome trim is held in place by the U shape section on top of the seat. Not perfect, but better than it was.

 

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Posted (edited)

OK, serious work happening now! As mention before blower motor was not working, but was on the list to service anyway. This meant taking the motor apart, cleaning up any debris and the commutator on the armature and lubricating the bearings. Helps keep them quiet and running for another 58 years.
 

Found motor was not connected and ran on all speeds so pretty happy about that. But service was going to happen regardless. Access made the motor easy to remove and tear down showed it was in excellent condition. Oiled the bearings and left overnight to soak in and cleaned the commutator with white spirit. 

 

Interesting part was holding the brushes and springs in place when reassembling but a couple of brass wire U clips did that. All back together running sweet. 
 

 

 

 

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Cleaned up resistor and connector plug and cleaned the rust off the blower fan and gave it a prime and paint to make it pretty. Didn’t really want the rusty smell when operating the heater. The operation of the controls was very stiff so pulled the distribution box out and removed all the dust and grime with a disinfectant spray to make it squeaky clean. 
 

Some lubricant on the heater door hinge pins and a clean up of the operating cable will make a difference. I really want all these controls smooth and easy to use. Only part way through but a few pics.

To be continued .....

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

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Finished cleaning the heater distribution box today and redid some of the internal sound deadening material. Paid particular attention to the outlet vents as they were grubby and not a simple clean. Replaced the box and added a missing screw and washer. Adjusted the cables and checked the operation of the main air flap. Amazing the difference in the volume of air that it now produces from the vents and the defroster outlets. It should work very well, but one more task to do is to replace the heater hoses and remove the restrictive kink in one of them.

But that won’t happen until I get the proper radiator hoses and change out the coolant!

 

Glove box also needs to go back in but waiting for the glue to dry. Used a Weldbond glue on each of the seams and speed nuts to give it some strength before replacing. 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

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Too bad you put that fibre insulation back in there. This would have been a good place to modernize with foil faced foam insulation, to cut down on any potential for moisture to cause mold or mildew.

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On 3/28/2021 at 12:44 AM, JohnD1956 said:

Too bad you put that fibre insulation back in there. This would have been a good place to modernize with foil faced foam insulation, to cut down on any potential for moisture to cause mold or mildew.


John, I did consider using something modern, however apart from being dusty it was in good condition, no sign of damp or rot. After removing the dust, just glued it back with the dust side down, cleaner side up. If I feel like I want to revisit it, I can quite easily. Meantime got the glovebox back in after glue was dry. Paid special attention to securing the speed nut fasteners as they can rip out of the cardboard. 
 

And found a few treasures, safety pin in the defrost hose and the book of matches under the dashboard along with a nickel that will stay in the ashtray!

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀
 

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The matchbook is great. I have run into many Red Lion bars and restaurant in my life.  Played in a few of them earlier in my life, eaten at more then 1 or two and drinks at numerous ones.

Glad to see they have a presence down under though I have to wonder if they know who General Washington was.

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7 hours ago, Bill Stoneberg said:

The matchbook is great. I have run into many Red Lion bars and restaurant in my life.  Played in a few of them earlier in my life, eaten at more then 1 or two and drinks at numerous ones.

Glad to see they have a presence down under though I have to wonder if they know who General Washington was.


Bill, Red Lion bars don’t have a presence here at all, this is what I found under the dash board. Had been sitting under there a long time by the condition..

 

And another big win this time. The PO chose to use the reverse lamps as indicators and delete the reverse lamps altogether. Don’t think he drove after dark, but I do!
 

Luckily a guy named Richard did the wiring and he made sure that it could be reverse engineered if needed. He ran a dedicated wire for the brake lamps and swapped out the bulb contacts. He just taped over the reverse lamp wires so everything was in place.

 

Importantly Richard had written some notes along with a copy of the wiring diagram, so it did not take long to put it back to standard. I used to work with Richard at the Croydon Automotive College so was pleased to see his handy work.

 

Very pleased with the outcome.

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

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Have I now created a trailer queen!!!
 

we have a classic car event coming up so spent some time with a clay bar, polish and wax to remove stains and some imperfections. Paint was never perfect but there were areas that I knew could be better. 
 

It is amazing what a clay bar will remove, very labour intensive but you don’t do it every week! Had finished the boot lid, bonnet and top of the rear quarters and it was coming up a treat. Hang on it starting to look like a trailer queen when a phone call tells me that it is needed for a wedding the next day.

 

Rather than panic, just kept to the process, one section at a time until only the LH fender needed to be done plus all of the RHS. Those bits just got a quick once over and will revisit later.

 

Really chuffed that Ashley and Vanessa wanted to use the Skylark and they got to ride in it to the gardens for the ceremony. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Wow, what an Easter weekend. As we had the Skylark downtown for the wedding, it was our our transport as we were down for three nights. With warm day and evening temperatures we did some top down cruising at night with headlights now working. Certainly a fun car to cruise, lots of comments, lots of looks!

 

Only concern was the need to add 1.25litres of water on the Sunday morning before we left. Admittedly it was warm conditions and the PO had fitted a 10LB pressure cap (should be 15LB) so it possibly pumped some out the overflow over the week end. Checked after the drive home and level was OK but will swap that out tomorrow.

 

On the way home on Sunday, collected some parcels that a friend had kindly picked up on Thursday. With what I also had picked up on my way to town,  had my own little “Early Christmas present”. A Buick transistor radio in very nice condition with the mounting bracket, escutcheons, some ventiports and a set of Cibie QH headlights. Radio will be converted to the Aurora Design AM/FM/MP3/Bluetooth and hands free telephone which will give me some tunes!
 

Cibies are a very nice light and have the round faces similar to the conventional OEM sealed beams. As mentioned earlier, the beams the PO had installed were OK, however the fitting into the headlamp seat left a lot to be desired. And besides, she deserves the best!

 

The miles just keep getting added. 67095 now so that’s 942 very happy (s)miles

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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All done, waiting for another road trip. Daytime or night time won’t be an issue now!

 

Small home made tool is great to remove and reattach the hold down springs on each headlight seat. Changed enough of them to make it earn its keep.

 

And the great set of car covers that I use for each of the Buicks, keeps off the dust and easy to R and R anytime.

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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Well a few surprises today! A parcel from the USA with some Skylark parts.

 

Inside was a washer bottle, and some NOS parts including door switches, remote trunk release and a gas cap. Many thanks to fellow Buick Forum member, Pete Phillips.

 

Was a little stumped why the Skylark had courtesy lights but no switches. Found the wiring for them several weeks back (and taped them up as they were bare and live) but nothing showed where the switches would go. There was a rubber plug way back in the hinge pillar that I thought was the sealing grommet for the wire. Service manuals gave no indication.

 

Searching the ‘63 Dealer Bulletins that I got from Jim Cannon, came across one about all Special coupes and convertibles from a certain build will now have automatic courtesy lights. The diagram showed an arrow where the plug is fitted suggesting it has to be removed. ( no words mind you). 🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔

 

Yep, that’s where it fits, in the existing hole put in by the factory. So now it was a simple job to remove the plug and install the switch. A small round file ensured there was bare metal for the contacts. And we have lights!

 

Gas cap is now on but the trunk release will have to wait! 
Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Let’s hope this works!
 

When cleaning up the Buick badge on the grille, thought that removing it might be a good move so I could clean up around the grille bars as well. Hmm, seems the badge had seen better days with a poor sort of repair with JB Weld. So with not much to lose, took it all apart and decided to attempt a better repair and some refurbishment along the way. Pics will make a better story.

 

Used a thin brass rod to remove all the paint, then used Humbrol model paints in silver, red, white and blue to repaint the underside. No primer needed 😀😀😀😀

 

With some tough but flexible construction adhesive glued a round aluminium plate on the rear of the chrome surround. The plate had two threaded studs inserted behind and the heads filed to give clearance to the black face plate.

 

Thin rubber sheet was placed between the plastic tri shields and the black face as per the original.

 

Two pins on the chrome tri shield chrome were peened over the black face plate and with same adhesive glued the face and badge to the aluminium plate. Some thin rubber tube on the studs prevents the nuts from being over tightened and pulling the plate away from the surround.

 

The difference in colours is striking, David Dunbar Buick would be proud!

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

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Had a great Sunday with the annual McLaren Vale Vintage and Classic car run. Over 530 vehicles assembled in a grassed field in one of the wineries then parade through the Main Street of McLaren Vale with thousands of spectators to cheer and wave us by.

 

Then each group of vehicles travels to a nearby allocated winery and is then on display while there owners partake of the food, wine and music that is made available. Monies raised support the local hospital, emergency fire service and several other local organisations 

 

With the power top deciding to not cooperate when we first arrived, it eventually did come down after wiggling the plug for the relay box ( I think ) so we did get to tour topless!

 

Like many, Jo and I dressed in period costume but am told I need to get mine sorted a bit better!

 

The all aluminium 215cu in V8 is a sure conversation starter too!

 

 

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The event bought to notice the problem of the radiator wanting to puke some coolant after it has been running for some time. That day, the first time was after we had idled for about ten minutes waiting for a straggler, Jo noticed steam coming out from the bonnet area and saw coolant on the ground, not a lot but concerning. At the winery after it had cooled needed about 1.5 litres of spring water to bring it back to correct level. After the trip home and checking it the next morning, level was good! Go figure 🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔

 

So this morning, pulled the radiator, hoses and thermostat to assess the problem to find a cause. Radiator looked OK and has been recored not too long ago but am having it power flushed and checked by a radiator shop. Thermostat was 192 degree which I figure is way too hot for my liking so will exchange it for 180 degree. Will see what the radiator shop finds also but confident that this should resolve it. Need to organise a proper gauge for oil and temp so we can keep an eye on these vitals. Not a big fan of lights.

 

And found part of the cause of the intermittent heater function where it would heat fine for a time then seem to run cool. The second photo shows the heater hoses look very restricted in two areas and not even sure that they are routed properly but will sort this also.

 

Just waiting on the radiator hoses and some other bits to turn up in the post. Meantime I have some other jobs that I wish to do, so a non running Skylark won’t be a problem.

 

To be continued 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

And we just keep putting the miles on it!  So far, 1254 miles since purchase. 😀😀😀😀

 

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And looking at the manual, I think the routing is incorrect. The hose coming off the top of the valve should go into the top of the heater core . The lower hose off the heater core should connect to the front at the water pump. And the lower connection on the valve should connect to the rear of the intake manifold.

 

Would like confirmation on that if I could?

 

 

 

 

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Edited by rodneybeauchamp
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Hi Rodney.  I would concur with your findings that your system is improperly routed. The way this is hooked up you are restricting the hot water flow AFTER the heater core.  Where-as the manual describes temp control as a factor of hot water restriction BEFORE the heater core.  Since the heater control valve description in the manual indicates that it is the restriction at the valve that gives you the heat temperature in the cabin, it would seem, to me, that when you experience the sudden cooling inside the car, it is because the valve is receiving a signal that the interior is too hot for your setting and thus closes.  In your case this causes the system to restrict hot water coming out of the heater core,  where the fan continues to blow outside cold air through it, thus cooling that small portion of coolant to the point it has no more heat to release.  Re routing the valve should solve that problem.  

 

 But I think you are also going to find that it is near impossible to avoid kinking the hoses to hook it up the way it was designed to be.  You will likely have to make large loops of heater hose to smooth that out.  Although the manual does not show the use of formed hoses, I do wonder if you might find some at the parts store that can be used to mitigate those sharp turns.  It won't look right to you, or me, but 99% of the people wouldn't know or care about that. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

 

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Hi Rodney.  I would concur with your findings that your system is improperly routed. The way this is hooked up you are restricting the hot water flow AFTER the heater core.  Where-as the manual describes temp control as a factor of hot water restriction BEFORE the heater core.  Since the heater control valve description in the manual indicates that it is the restriction at the valve that gives you the heat temperature in the cabin, it would seem, to me, that when you experience the sudden cooling inside the car, it is because the valve is receiving a signal that the interior is too hot for your setting and thus closes.  In your case this causes the system to restrict hot water coming out of the heater core,  where the fan continues to blow outside cold air through it, thus cooling that small portion of coolant to the point it has no more heat to release.  Re routing the valve should solve that problem.  

 

 But I think you are also going to find that it is near impossible to avoid kinking the hoses to hook it up the way it was designed to be.  You will likely have to make large loops of heater hose to smooth that out.  Although the manual does not show the use of formed hoses, I do wonder if you might find some at the parts store that can be used to mitigate those sharp turns.  It won't look right to you, or me, but 99% of the people wouldn't know or care about that. 

 

 


That was my thought. My local store is very helpful taking me in to the store area before to match things up, so hoping they will do the same. And as John says, restricting the flow after the heater core means that the inside will not stay warm for long. Thank you for confirming about the hose routing and for the explanation why the system does not work properly. 
 

Just think of all the increased value I have now added by getting things right and working! 🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔

 

 Suppose this is what is meant by getting a car “sorted”. As much as it really annoys me to find so many small and not so small things that were done poorly or incorrectly during the previous “restoration”, it gives me a great deal of pride and satisfaction knowing that they have now been put back 100% right. Hindsight is such a wonderful teacher.

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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Posted (edited)

Well, little done yesterday but today was a different story. Had in my mind how all the hoses were going to run but reality was a different matter. Once all the heater hoses were removed, reshaped the outlets on the heater core and valve to get them round again. Then cleaned up the hose clamps and gave them some lubrication to help them work properly. 

The circuit the hoses take is very torturous and tight and was a bit  apprehensive about having long loops of hose to ease the bends. My local Bursons manager was on the ball and suggested an S bend hose put out by Dayco that with a slight trimming would give me two of the hoses. The third is just straight hose.

 

Well I am really impressed how all this turned out, the bends are smooth and not restricted and it looks great. My hands are a testimony as to the tight spaces and sharp corners on the carburettor and other bits that bite, but they can still type. A phone call from my radiator shop just put the icing on the cake.

 

Radiator was very clean and had been recored about seven years ago which is what I figured. Holds pressure and no leaks and Rob suggested all should be good with 180 thermostat and new cap. Plan B would be to make it a three row core for more capacity but he would need to source a different bottom tank, which is no big deal. 
 

Will fit that up tomorrow and then think I will connect it back in with the old hoses and test for leaks, cooling etc while waiting for correct moulded hoses to arrive. If all good, then I can dump the clean water and put on the hoses when they arrive, knowing the system is good. And add the proper coolant at that point!

 

And have got some nice gauges happening as we type, from Speedhut. They had the design on file that I used in the Riviera back in 2016 and will match those again. Nice big 2 5/8” dials with easy to see numbers. Will be able to keep an eye on those vitals very soon!
 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀


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Edited by rodneybeauchamp
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And got this today, a picture from Sunday! This was as we were just coming into the paddock first thing. We were pretty early but still lots of cars already in line.

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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That hose looks perfect. Save the moulded hoses for future emergencies. And by the way, what was the manufacturer and part number for that "s" shaped hose? I am thinking of a different application possibility.

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12 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

That hose looks perfect. Save the moulded hoses for future emergencies. And by the way, what was the manufacturer and part number for that "s" shaped hose? I am thinking of a different application possibility.


Yes John, am really pleased with the outcome, was almost too good to spoil it by putting the clamps on 😀😀😀😀
 

The 3/4” S hose was Dayco DSHB19 and from what I have seen they do the same hose in a multitude of sizes. Two were used, one for the short right angle from valve to core, the other trimmed at one end goes from the rear of the manifold to the heater valve. The hose from the bottom heater core outlet is plain Dayco heater hose which makes a gentle rise and curve running along the RH rocker cover ending in a gentle sweep into the water pump. 
 

All of the old hoses were just plain heater hose, not moulded however have saved one plus what I had left over from a length of new. In an emergency a long length of straight hose could be used to substitute for any of the hoses.
 

As mentioned Dayco and possibly others make this universal S hose in a multitude of sizes which makes this sort of project much easier. BTW the label stated “Made in Thailand” and found when they were cut, the reinforcing within the hose was a stringy jute like cord. Not sure as to the longevity but will keep an eye on them. No doubt other manufacturers would make a similar hose.

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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