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1948 Tucker Convertible 1 of 1


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1948 Tucker Convertible 1 of 1 Prototype Only 10 ORIGINAL MILES!
$2,595,000

 

About This Vehicle
 
 
 
Driven 10 miles
 
Manual transmission
 
Exterior color: Blue · Interior color: Tan
 
VIN: 1057
 
Fuel type: Other
This vehicle is not on display to the public. An appointment is required to view it.  Preston Tucker, the man behind the Tucker automobile, was a charismatic rebel who was possessed by his creativity and determined to do what many said couldn’t be done. His cup of creativity bubbled with activity. As his career unfolded, it became clear his destiny was to shake off his contemporaries and to do what had never been done before. He was David looking for his Goliath. He was fearless and more than a bit of a gambler. Ready to risk his fame and fortune, he jumped headfirst into an inevitable collision with the establishment. He was determined to capture his dream and build a car that he believed America deserved – a safer, sportier and entirely unconventional sedan with baked-in engineering that his competitors could not match. Early in his career he and a partner worked to help Henry Ford with race car engineering and design. Tucker was the inventor of the Tucker Turret, a powered gun turret that was mounted to military vehicles in the Second World War. It played a key role in the success of the allied armies. Tucker is most remembered for his attempt to challenge the big three American auto manufacturers by starting his own, ultra-innovative car company, the Tucker Corporation. Tucker’s goal was to apply his unconventional wisdom and common sense to build a car that excelled in areas such as styling, safety, performance, value, and engineering. If Tucker succeeded it would have taken the “Big Three” several years and hundreds of millions of dollars to retrofit their cars in an attempt to compete. And as they did so they would have been relegated to the side of the road as they watched a Tucker drift by, eroding their domination of the American car industry. Tucker accomplished what he set out to do with what he called the Tucker 48. The Tucker 48 sedan was unlike any other car in the world when it was introduced. Some of its most unique features were a “Safety Windshield”, centered swiveling third headlight, quick-swap powertrain setup, and rear-mounted “flat-six” aircraft engine that was updated with water jackets for proper cooling. The Safety Windshield was anti-shard laminated and was designed to be easily removed in the case of an accident. The centered swiveling third headlight was synchronized to the movement of the steering wheel to help the driver see around bends in the road. Even today, synchronized headlights don’t appear in any but the most expensive cars and their appearance is a relatively recent addition to what is supposed to be “state of the art” automobiles. The quick swap powertrain (engine and transmission) setup was designed to be easily be swapped within fifteen minutes of arriving at a Tucker service department. This system was developed so that customers could drop off the powertrain at the dealership and leave quickly with a “loaner powertrain.” This would allow an owner to avoid waiting, sometimes for days, as their car was repaired, an inconvenience common among conventional cars. Imagine the advantage of such an option if you were on a long-distance trip with a car full of kids. The Tucker 48’s rear-mounted Franklin aircraft engine could go from zero to sixty in just seven seconds! This kind of performance eclipses that of many of today's full-size luxury sedans. Because of the “flat-six” design, which means that the engine has six horizontally opposed cylinders, the car had a much lower center of gravity. This allowed it to navigate corners and winding roads as if it were a European sports car. Today, Tuckers have captured the imagination of car collectors everywhere as they speculate about what might have been. Could the “Big Three” have ever caught up? As the Tucker 48s were rolling off the assembly line Preston was already busy devising changes and improvements that would be built into future production runs. The first Tucker ever produced was a prototype sedan, known as the “Tin Goose”. Fifty-eight frames and bodies were built at the factory. From these parts, 36 sedans were finished before the factory was closed. In addition, one prototype convertible known as “Vera” was started but not finished at the factory. Since the factory closed, an additional 15 sedans have been completed for a total of 51. The convertible was completed in early 2010, pushing the total to 52. The majority of these vehicles are in excellent condition. When the cars appear at auction, which is rare, they command prices attained by only a few marquee cars. A Tucker sedan sold earlier this year at RM’s auction for just under $2,000,000 with buyer’s premium. Little is known about what projects were being worked on in the Tucker Corporation experimental department when the Tucker plant was forced to close. However, it’s known that chassis number 57, the prototype for a future model, was underway. A Tucker Corporation design engineer was once interv

Dealership Information

 
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5201 Grisham Dr, Rowlett, TX 75088, USA
Rowlett, Dallas County, Texas 75088Get Directions
 
(469) 820-3391
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Here we go again.........the car that can’t find a buyer........2.6 large........the ad clearly states the 1948 Sucker was built in 2010. (Sucker=Tucker)

 

Ad also clearly states 36 cars were built, and 52 remain. So, if you purchase any car built after production ended..........you really did by a Sucker’s Tucker.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I've seen this car before and, while it's frowned on by many for not being a true "production car"  and the price being laughably wrong, I like it and feel the builders did a good job on it.  I'd be happy driving it around southern California.

(for maybe 1/100th the current asking price).

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
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I do not know why it is just not looked at and referred to as a one off custom. It would still have the value of a Tucker. Higher value for being a convertible? Higher value from being a custom? The open market sets those prices. If a factory produced car, there would be documents to back it. To much is known about the production/history of Tucker. I think it is a good looking custom. Way out of my price range. I remember the wind storm that hit the auctions in AZ. I think this car was there.

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In a bigger sense, Tucker cars are interesting. Back in the 70’s they were available, inexpensive, and looked at as a “red headed stepchild “.  Out comes the movie......presto.........they jump from 20 grand to a million dollars. Everything you need to know about them.........from obscure, to must have in three months. The cars didn’t become better or more desirable..........they became famous. People started asking to see them at many of the popular open to the public museums...........and so the footnote to history became a legend. So the question is.........what is the “real value “ of a Tucker.......not in the monetary sense, but in the scope of automotive history. The Playboy that has a current thread going on here in many ways is similar...........around the same date and production. Maybe they should do a movie on the Playboy and we can see them sell in the seven figures. As a custom build the Tucker convertible sure looks well done from a restoration perspective. The question is, is it a “real” Tucker. It’s been for sale for ten years..........factor that into the answer.

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A truly valuable car needs little explanation.

 

When one has to write a thousand words to explain what coulda woulda shoulda been, then it’s all smoke and mirrors and a sales pitch.

 

I agree they should just call it a custom “in the style of” and not push a flimsy back story.

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The most overrated collector car in history.

 

I think there are at least 2 other threads on the convertible.    I know little about Tucker history but I agree with Dave that when the story gets long you need to watch out.

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Tucker: Its "famous for being famous" and "a legend in its own mind" sort of like a lot of people...

 

Does anyone else see a 1942-'48 GM C-Body Series convertible central body structure with Tucker front clip and rear fenders and deck hung on it?

Edited by 58L-Y8
Edited '47 to '48 since Buick had the body through then. (see edit history)
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Technically, someone could run off 50 more with replica bodies and 21st century drivetrain components. If that can be done with Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg designs....why not Tucker? Do a mold and you could fab some fiberglass bodies and drop a Porsche 911 boxer motor in. Even though my Toyota pickup has more HP than a base 3.4 911 Carrera, the Not-A-Tucker would do more than get out of it's own way. I agree with Ed and Xander that the shop did a good job on the convertible, but I'm holding onto my 2 million until they do a station wagon.😄

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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