Les Tornga

1926 Standard 6

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I am getting ready to pull engine. Looking for advice. It appears that there are two bolts into front cross over member and in the rear the clutch/flywheel cover is attached to the frame on either side. I am planning on pulling steering column up and maybe moving or removing steering gear box. The transmission looks like it can be supported and left in place. [ will a pilot shaft be necessary when reconnecting ?] Any advice or shortcuts will be appreciated. 

 

Thanks, Les

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Welcome

The make may help a bit, 1926 had a few different manufacturers making 6 dyliners.

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Posted (edited)

"Standard" was actually the make of a car,

manufactured in Pennsylvania.  They are very

uncommonly seen.  I doubt that the original poster

meant that;  people can help him greatly if he is

more specific.

 

 

1921 Standard Eight car ad.jpg

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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If it is a 1926 Buick Standard 6  I have pulled the engine on my 1925 and used a 2X4 to span the frame and straps to support the transmission. I did not use a pilot on the main shaft to reinstall but did use 2 pilot bolts on the rear of the engine to align the transmission.

 

DSCF6306.thumb.JPG.fc61ee1b6ef789dd3c4399cf317b8fe9.JPG It was quite tricky to tilt the engine to clear the steering box.

DSCF7006.thumb.JPG.5d33bce186eed9eb54a772a7dac85cac.JPG  A year later...

By the time the engine rebuild had been done I had also removed the steering box. Easier reinstall.

 DSCF7012.thumb.JPG.874f7976cea23b6b3153d205a862dc6c.JPG

I had to use the blue come along straps to get the engine/transmission back to alignment in the frame..

DSCF7220.thumb.JPG.4f4ab676399a3f60dd1d30b58ca3af6a.JPG

 Engine finished in place and now running.

 

 

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Les - I just mounted my big Kissel 6-38 engine into its 1918 Kissel chassis with the body and cowl on. I used an engine balancing tool at the end of my winch so that we could tilt the engine in. If you look at the pictures, the Kissel mounts may be very similar to what you are dealing with. I left the steering column in place because dealing with the pitman arm once covered would have been a pain. If you have your engine hooked up properly, front under cross member brackets, and rear close to the end of the head, you should be able to tilt your engine DOWNWARDS/SIDEWAYS to clear the steering column and DOWNWARDS to snake it into the rear mounts under the cowl. these Kissel engines mount with the transmission/clutch on, so they are long. but the trans is small without the lever. Obviously all pedals and emergency brake were off. Radiator and lights were off for ease of access as well.

Good luck. RON HAUSMANN P.E.

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IMG_0260[34891].jpg

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4 hours ago, Les Tornga said:

will a pilot shaft be necessary when reconnecting ?

 

If it’s a flat plate clutch you  should align your clutch disc with a pilot prior to tightening it down, then all you need to do is alignment of the splines as you mate them up. 

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Thanks to all who responded. Very helpful. I an waiting for a little warmer weather to pull engine and will keep checking back for more tips and will update on progress.

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Thanks to all who responded. Very helpful. I an waiting for a little warmer weather to pull engine and will keep checking back for more tips and will update on progress. This car is a Buick 2 door. I do not know the model but it has a small door behind passenger door, for golf clubs if my info is correct. 

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People who have never worked on cars full time for a living have a hard time understanding your best bet when pulling an engine on a pre war car that you are much better off taking the transmission out first. It's easy to do, and will prevent accidental damage coming in and out with the engine. It doesn't even add more than two or three hours to the job, why risk it and spend hours trying to get things to line up. Then you can also clean the transmission, drive shaft, etc. If the car need a motor rebuild, you should at least go through the rest of the car......chassis, brakes, exhaust, cooling system. In the past I had customer with a very valuable car that needed an engine overhaul........he said his radiator, generator, water pump, distributor and all the other things were fine. We passed on the job...........if you are going to do an engine, do it right, the first time. It takes some more time and dollars, but the result is ten times better. Good luck with your project. Ed

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Thanks for the tip. The transmission does need to be removed to be cleaned. That will be my next step and looks to be fairly easy. Les

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Les, All, - some cars like the Kiisels use a Spocer drive shaft system. These have the front universal joint as a separate piece with a sliding shaft that fits in between the trans and rest of shaft and then can be slipped forward to permanently connect to the trans. So coupling things together is easy if you have this setup.

Ron

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Ed:

 On my 1925 I had already done the transmission several years before when I redid the clutch. Our Buick Torque Tubes are quite fun to work with. I did not feel like moving the rear axle back again so I just left it in place. Also I still needed to move the car around. 

 Since your transmission also needs attended to I would raise the entire car on jack stands and roll the rear axle back after disconnecting the transmission remove the unit from below. (removing the tires and rims give enough space to roll back the axle with out raising the rear of the body to scary heights.)

DSCF2874.thumb.JPG.7c66664f757e42247f4715f42096c6e6.JPG  DSCF2876.thumb.JPG.941922d17b5d79e926e9099795e4b586.JPG

Been there and should not have done that!  Because of the cantilever spring arrangement everything is in the way. That is why service garages of the time show the fronts and rears of the cars being raised with chain falls from the ceiling.

1912561081_image.thumb.png.01f412bdfa198ca8fa5ffa723f3bb1db1.thumb.png.9c4ae542b317b19cef7312c5aa770404.png Buick dealership circa 1925.

The transmission IS easier to reinstall with the engine in place.

DSCF2980.thumb.JPG.255cb6a29cb6836c94cdee5a18841ab8.JPG

 

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Larry, Thanks for input. Because of type of driveshaft  type, transmission removal seems complicated. Do you think if engine is moved forward a couple of inches that it will be easier to then remove transmission and then finish removing engine. I am not to sure about my ability to move rear axle back. 

 

Thanks, Les

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Thanks again. I went and looked again (both eyes open) and understand about moving rear axle back. I was not seeing the big picture. Not sure if I will do it that way or after the engine is removed. Steering gear and other stuff all removed from engine so those obstacles are out of the way to remove engine. Thanks again. 

 

Les

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On ‎3‎/‎21‎/‎2019 at 9:40 AM, John_S_in_Penna said:

"Standard" was actually the make of a car,

manufactured in Pennsylvania.  They are very

uncommonly seen.  I doubt that the original poster

meant that;  people can help him greatly if he is

more specific.

 

 

1921 Standard Eight car ad.jpg

There was also the Standard Motor Company in England which became 'Standard-Triumph' after the second world war.

 

Craig

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Posted (edited)

Les:  You may now want to have this thread moved to the Buick Pre War.

As you can see by the period photo the engine/transmission can be removed entirely. The 1924 model 44 roadster in the foreground. That would necessitate the removal of the transmission shift tower, clutch and brake pedals. In the photo they probably lifted the engine/trans unit at the front a bit because the oil pan has to clear the frame cross member. With several people helping to snake the engine out they rolled the car back. Also, there is barely enough room for fingers between the engine and the firewall. Once the engine is lifted to clear the frame the rear of the head would rub tight against the firewall. I had a bit more room since I had the head off removing and installing my engine.

107087341_image.thumb.png.01f412bdfa198ca8fa5ffa723f3bb1db1(2).png.6fee5c9d6e88fcb44247246423048798.png

Notice in the back round there is a mechanic removing an engine from a 1922 Buick Touring car and the angle the engine is at to clear the firewall and front frame cross member. They did not even remove the headlights! Just the tie bar. The lights will have to be removed on your 1926 since the lights mount on top of the tie bar.

 Also a great suggestion on removal and installation. Make a spreader to open up the frame a bit to side the engine out/in on the frame mounting blocks. They do fit tight! An extra 1/16 to 1/8 inch is very helpful.

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Terry Wiegand came up with this to help remove the engine from his 1916.

Edited by dibarlaw
Added content (see edit history)
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Larry, thanks for all the tips. We were able to remove engine with very few problems. I removed steering gear and although it wasn't necessary to spread the frame, we used a pry bar with a just a bit of power and motor mounts cleared the frame. We pulled it until mounts were at widest spot on frame. all of your advice helped a lot and after I remove transmission, we may move rear end back for replacing trans. 

 

 I don,t know how to move this or do a thread but will keep trying.

 

Again, thanks

Les

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