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1927 Buick standard 6 piston rings


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Terry:

 I see he did not mention that he got rings only. He mentioned pistons and rings from EGGE. He just added that

 fact that our pistons are made with an offset . 

 The problem arises when one tries to reuse the original cast iron pistons.

 There is an article done by Frank Burgoyne in the June 1977 Buick Bugle about a "1925 Piston swap tip". It was of interest to me because of me having the same car/engine. The title is misleading because what was done did not swap out 1925 pistons. Mr Burgoyne was outraged at the proposed $600 cost of rebuilding the engine. 1925 Standards have a 3" bore. He bought a 1926 chassis for $75 with a good engine and installed that 1926 engine instead. The 1926 engine has a 3 1/8" bore. He sited that he was using 1941-1972 aluminum Willys Jeep pistons. He said that the pin bore and compression height "was just about right". Then goes in to say the rods had to be reworked for the 13/16" pins.  He indicates that at the time the pistons were available by the each from Wards or Sears but you would have to buy 2 sets of rings (4cylinder Jeep).

 If Lenny is going to have the cylinders bored or just honed and get new rings to the proper size they will have to be sourced. The 6 new Ross pistons with, pins, rings for my 1925 191 cu in engine was well over $1000. I was reading in an early 1960s AACA Antique Automobile magazine about someone restoring a mid teens "Lewis" automobile. (Thanks Terry for the reading material!) When he needed pistons and rings he contacted a national supplier like "Perfect Circle" and they made them up. It just does not happen now in this day and age. Everything for our cars is special order situation.

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10 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Terry:

 I see he did not mention that he got rings only. He mentioned pistons and rings from EGGE. He just added that

 fact that our pistons are made with an offset . 

 The problem arises when one tries to reuse the original cast iron pistons.

 There is an article done by Frank Burgoyne in the June 1977 Buick Bugle about a "1925 Piston swap tip". It was of interest to me because of me having the same car/engine. The title is misleading because what was done did not swap out 1925 pistons. Mr Burgoyne was outraged at the proposed $600 cost of rebuilding the engine. 1925 Standards have a 3" bore. He bought a 1926 chassis for $75 with a good engine and installed that 1926 engine instead. The 1926 engine has a 3 1/8" bore. He sited that he was using 1941-1972 aluminum Willys Jeep pistons. He said that the pin bore and compression height "was just about right". Then goes in to say the rods had to be reworked for the 13/16" pins.  He indicates that at the time the pistons were available by the each from Wards or Sears but you would have to buy 2 sets of rings (4cylinder Jeep).

 If Lenny is going to have the cylinders bored or just honed and get new rings to the proper size they will have to be sourced. The 6 new Ross pistons with, pins, rings for my 1925 191 cu in engine was well over $1000. I was reading in an early 1960s AACA Antique Automobile magazine about someone restoring a mid teens "Lewis" automobile. (Thanks Terry for the reading material!) When he needed pistons and rings he contacted a national supplier like "Perfect Circle" and they made them up. It just does not happen now in this day and age. Everything for our cars is special order situation.

Always love the added info here.  We will hone the cylinders to start and as of right now it looks like we have the tolerance to reuse the Pistons.  If not we will have a new set made.   Already made the decision I'm not going to try to retrofit something else.  Do it right. Do it once.  I have another post with the car under restoration. My goal when done is to have a real original driver that is as reliable as possible for 1927 vintage.  I am going to contact the resources contributed and hopefully I'll find the rings!

 

 

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