Jump to content

"Mag Wheels" In the AACA Official Revue : Disgusting !!!


Recommended Posts

To say a car that has some modifications is not an antique car is incorrect - it is still an antique car (and always will be) but it is now an antique car with modification.  The AACA allows modified cars to be judged - look at a judging sheet and see the deductions for cars that have modificiations - they are numerous and some are large deductions that most likely disqualify you from any award.  The HPOF even allows modifications - they too will be noted and points deducted.  

 

At what point, in your view, is a car no longer antique? Is it with 1 minor modification (i.e. incorrect hose clamps), or 3 or 7 or .....? You get the point.  Not all modifications are the same - some can cost you tons of points and some may cost you 1.  To say a car must be 100% as it left the factory before it is allowed to be on the show field is unreasonable.  Are you going to ask the person who has a minor modification to leave with his car immediately?  When you get to that level of rigidity on showing, you will kiss most shows goodbye.

 

Also, I am in some single marque clubs that are allowing modified cars BUT they are modified to the point where they would not be be "knowingly" allowed on a AACA National Meet field.  There is a big difference and to compare those with what AACA allows is unfair.

 

 

Bob

Edited by Bob Hill (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

As mentioned previously, the AACA allows some latitude regarding period-correct modifications in the DPW class and on tours.  This allows people to enjoy the AACA experience without the need to have a 375-point car or an HPOF vehicle.  Elitists who harass vehicle owners for their non-authentic components simply drive members away.  And when they're gone, so are their dues and future contributions to the organization.

 

To me, this hobby is about the people I meet.  The cars just bring us together.

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, ted sweet said:

i heard a gentleman walking past my 91 chrysler at hershey saying he doesnt want cars built after ww2 at aaca showsa

 

Adapt or die. His choice...............Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is still a free country and I'll walk past whatever that has no interest to me to get to vehicles that are  worth my time to inspect and admire. It is also comforting to be among people that share the same interests in the hobby, let the post WWII squabble among themselves. They fought so hard to get in, tough bunch to keep happy. 

 

 

Bob 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

It is still a free country and I'll walk past whatever that has no interest to me to get to vehicles that are  worth my time to inspect and admire.

 

Of course, I do too. Why would anyone want to look at things that do not interest them?

 

It is those people who make rude remarks about vehicles they are not interested in that drives people away. Those people have bad manners, shouldn't go out in public, just stay as trolls on the internet....😉

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you turn to page 63 of Mark Dees book  "The Miller Dynasty",  you will see illustration of the concept of the very first cast Aluminium  "blade wheels ", in patent drawings that Harry Miller submitted in September 1919.  It seems that this was just before Leo Goosen took employment with him.  There is no indication that Miller actually made and used these cast aluminium wheels; but definitely they constituted "Prior Art" to those Ettore Bugati used on his Type 35 racing cars several years later.  It was not unknown that Buggati sometimes borrowed someone else's concept when something of his own work was not good enough.  In 1923 a young graduate engineer from here in Melbourne, placed a firm order for an A model Duesenberg at the factory. Five  weeks later he was contacted at an address in Chicago, that the Duesenberg was ready for him to drive away.  Alan Powell told me in 1983 when I met him, that at his request, the highest compression ratio pistons were fitted, and numerically lowest axle ratio for fastest road speed.

Alan said that Fred Duesenberg himself   drove him on the Indianapolis Speedway; and he was given a certificate that it had been timed at 106mph, (though not necessarily when Alan Powell was a passenger.)

The car was shipped to England, and was driven at speed on Brooklands track.  He visited Bugati's estate ; and Alan told me in 1983 that he was most impressed how much of the car was produced on the property;  including fine upholstery leather, he said.

Then one of the racing drivers just happened to arrive,  and Alan was sent on an extended joy-ride in one of the Type 30 racing cars.   60 years later he became very angry about Bugati again.  He said "It never did him any good".  He found a team of mechanics had taken the Duesenberg hydraulic brakes apart,, and had the cylinder head off the engine of his new car.  Cylinder head design was not one of Duesnberg's strengths.   Stuart Murdoch ha a fine collection of cars, ( including one of the 1914 Indianapolis Delages.  He also has an early type 30 Bugatti with hydraulic front brakes, which I was told are poor.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...