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9 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Iron case on left

                                                                                                                                            Pot metal "Jury Rigged" on the right

Pop goes the weasel and so did my pop metal distributor body pop in 2 it did !!  

 Now I am cleaning up and painted the inside of my cast iron body that I'm going to put my old parts in .''God is good'' in my pile of spare parts that came with this car was a cast iron body . what a good day !!  Maybe to marrow I can try to start it . cutting the old one out took a wile but with a vacuum hose on the bottom and drilling out the top part of the body I managed to get it a part with out disassembling the hole side of the engine . I drilled out the top with a 3/16 drill to cut the old distributor body out wile still in the car so I would not lose no time trying to be reedy to get to the nationals paint or no paint just go to have a good time .--kyle 

          

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Good going Kyle. That is the same technique I use to get the swollen light and ignition switch levers out of the Delco dash unit.

 I will have to drill out what is left of the broken distributor in the spare 1925 Standard engine I picked up recently. Zoom in to see that the housing is already cracked. Fun with 1920s Buicks.

DSCF6600.thumb.JPG.62d9f0effaa714e3b0e1c46ebf042567.JPG

 

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I have stayed away from wood bodied cars as I have zero experience with wood / metal (sheet metal)  attachment.  I have wood experience from many years ago and with these pix showing how he did it makes a novice come out in me.   Still don't know how to fasten the sheet metal to the wood framing and have it look like new.    I'm a '37' / '38' coupe fan and I really like them.  My '38' is fitted out as my driving car with over drive.   Getting ready for my next trip of about 2500 miles.  Florida to Indiana and back. Oldbuickjim@gmail.com 

38 Buick Coupe .JPG

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8 hours ago, Jim Nelson said:

Getting ready for my next trip of about 2500 miles.  Florida to Indiana and back. Oldbuickjim@gmail.com 

built to drive :] 

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10 hours ago, sligermachine said:

the housing is got the start of a crack i see  do you have any housing around ?? kyle  

Kyle: The housing should be cast Iron and can be brazed. If it is slight you could also machine a collar to reinforce it to make sure it does not get worse. The bore is such that the distributor is just able to pivot with the angle of advance/retard.

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2 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Kyle: The housing should be cast Iron and can be brazed. If it is slight you could also machine a collar to reinforce it to make sure it does not get worse. The bore is such that the distributor is just able to pivot with the angle of advance/retard.

I meant that the housing on you "new" engine is got a crack in the housing that the distributor  goes in .Do we have any more around I did not see any around my spare parts but we could cast some get my foundry out and pore some new distributor housings that bolt to the starter generator  .out of aluminum .that is  faster than making from solid some times . might be just as fast to make out of solid though.can we get new distributor housings  easy  I could use 4 of them ?? -kyle   

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On 4/8/2018 at 10:08 AM, Hubert_25-25 said:

e, I hope this photo helps.  I will send you more information on the distributor replacement, I just want to help you get this one out.  As long as you don't break the big section of the housing, you may have something salvageable.

Hugh

Well I assembled this one enough times to do it in the dark . By the time I was happy with the way it looked . took some notes so you could look for some points--parts to work with . Maybe tomorrow I can try to see if it will fire up .--kyle

 pic. 1 bunch of bits to work with.

pic.3 is this the original coil ??  

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On 4/8/2018 at 9:16 AM, bradsan said:

Kyle

 

The original distributor is made of pot metal which swells when it eventually goes bad. And it will eventually go bad! After that happens, you are usually breaking the distributor to remove it.

The distributor can be replaced with a later cast Iron one ( or earlier;  I ended up converting a 1923-24 4cyl distributor ). See if your current distributor holds a magnet which should tell us whether someone has already replaced it .

The original distributor caps used 9MM plug wires.Some people use a much newer distributor that will take a later standard 6cyl GM cap and standard 7MM plug wires.

 

Careful hitting on the distributor , the cast iron end of the SG unit that holds the distributor can break and that part can be harder to find than the distributor !

I once  thought it would be interesting to try and get the distributors re-popped in aluminum. Maybe your CNC skills can come up with something?!!! The downside to that is that you would end up back at the hard to find caps and wires.

Brad

well if we had some caps I have a few like 4 or 5  we could recast some of 1100 pure aluminum ones . 

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Some parts that were originally pot metal, and rarely survive the test of use and time.

 

Horn button support, under horn plate at top of steering wheel

 

Spark and Throttle gears (4) at bottom of steering column

 

Some Distributor bodies

 

Ignition and Switch flip levers

 

Ignition and Light switch housing

 

Speedometer inner threaded section where speedometer cable attaches, as well as the small frames that hold the rotating odometer wheels

 

Some exterior door handles

 

Interior door and window winder handles

 

Golf bag door lock

 

Oil filter distribution block, on top of oil filter on 27’s

 

Carburetor heat and choke dash control plate

 

Ornate radiator caps, Goddess and T-bone type

 

Oakes Spare Tire Locks

 

Engine Valve and Spark Plug Cover wing nuts

 

Vacuum Fuel Tank cover

 

Marvel Carburetor cover and parts

 

I’m sure there are more too.

 

Most of these parts are subjected to torque and force (I.E., window winder handles, valve cover wing nuts, switch flip levers, spark and throttle gears) and when they crack and swell, they start to bind, and increased torque snaps them into uselessness.

 

Many of these parts have been reproduced and are available in brass or aluminum, and you can see how the car is much more safe, usable, and enjoyable after they have been replaced.

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Kyle, 

    That is the original coil.  I t belongs inside the cowl.  I see some corrosion in yours (like mine).  My plan is to mount the original coil in the original location in the passenger side of the cowl with just wires going to it but no power.  Then I plan to mount a modern 6 volt coil way up and hidden in the dash.  The modern coil will do the work and the original will be for show.   It is good to have a modern coil for start up and troubleshooting anyway.  

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new 6 volt coil and some new points I will order Don't want to brake down half way to the big shindig!!! 600 miles from home .

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Will it hurt to put the condenser closer to the coil I don't know if my old one is any good in side of the distributor??   

    Man I can type fast now days and my spelling has greatly improved  !!!!!!!!!!!--Kyle   . 

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I have always thought condensors lasted 3 to 1 over the lifetime of a set of points.  You can still get the condensors too, and I think they are fine in the distributor.

40 minutes ago, sligermachine said:

Will it hurt to put the condenser closer to the coil I don't know if my old one is any good in side of the distributor??   

    Man I can type fast now days and my spelling has greatly improved  !!!!!!!!!!!--Kyle   . 

And you thought the forum was only going to help you fix your old car.  So many benefits!

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Kyle:

 Looking great. I now how getting these finish items done helps keep one going on the project. Now that I have mine done for my Standard I am "antsy" to get the engine back. I will still have to trim the reformed SS carriage bolts that I used to install the brackets trimmed before I fit the radiator and shroud in to it.

DSCF6639.thumb.JPG.0308f959548246eb41e1f8c4ea4fd7b6.JPG Used the lathe to reform the heads round on the pan head carriage bolts.

 DSCF6640.thumb.JPG.d29ff228064ff3fc11d3fbd1a6382072.JPG I filed the 1/4" round holes to square to use the SS carriage bolts.

DSCF6642.thumb.JPG.1b52b4f5b1e98a406f6ce652c8aa9d6d.JPG I left the pan head shape on the bottom since it does not show.

DSCF6641.thumb.JPG.fa6a51eaf67985e741d42d27dcec86ae.JPG  Reformed heads in powder coated brackets. Notice lacing slots. DSCF6643.thumb.JPG.af17628f1ca340b47c4aea97b3a4f870.JPGAgain lacing slots at the top left.

     I will use my Dremmel tool with a diamond cut off wheel to get all the bolts flush with the jamb nuts.

 Again as I mentioned to you before that the shell you are using is from a 1926-1927 car. More rounded and has holes for attaching the lacing with rivets instead of slots as does the 1924 and 1925. You can see the slots in the photos I am posting.

 By 1930 if your Buick was in an accident and you needed a new shell the 1926-1927 style was the only part available from the factory.

Keep up the good work.

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1 hour ago, dibarlaw said:

g is from a 1926-1927 car. More rounded and has holes for attaching the lacing with rivets instead of slots as does the 1924 and 1925. You can see the slots in the photos I am posting.

 By 1930 if your Buick was in an accident and you needed a new shell the 1926-1927 style was the only part available from the factory.

Keep up the good work.

I do have a couple with slots But the Original one I have is not shiny and it is the original with I will post a pic. to night .I can not make up my mind about wich one to use the not shiny one is slots  and has a tag on it saying its original . one of my friends say don't re plate leave it original . I have 3 with slots the shop I sent it to to get redone took 3 months . and I have 1 more  1925 to restore yet .  

          Yours looks grate you took yours apart to plate I was just going the paint the chrome on my flanges that bolt down  can you do a close up of a bolt . I don't quite under stand the bolt part ?? ---kyle   PS  Do you have any good pic. of pre war sign?

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Kyle, 

      I don't know how authentic you are trying to get.  The 1925 original set up was black painted radiator support brackets that were installed onto the nickel plated shell with nickel plated rivets.  The 1/4" rivets (now usually stainless) can be threaded rivets (from www.restorationstuff.com and others) or modified carriage bolts.  If you have already plated the brackets, you could still paint them like you say.   Then you don't need to mess with the rivets at all.    I don't know why someone would say not to replate a nickeled radiator shell.  Your car would not be considered a "survivor" with original paint, so then most people go the route of a full restoration.  Your shell looks really nice.    

This is how Brad did the threaded rivets.  He cut a screwdriver slot in the back of the rivet.  He also painted the inside bottom of the shell as a little corrosion protection.    Hugh  

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Kyle : To match the round head rivet I took the pan head stainless carriage bolt, (.562 O.D.) reduced the O.D. by 3/16 to (.375) Then I used a tool I ground for the radius for the round shape. I filed and polished to where I liked the finish.  I used (2) 1/4-20 heavy nuts to chuck it up in a 3 jaw on my 10" South Bend lathe. The 2 nuts acting as lock nuts.

 The radiator hold down bolts are shown on page 12 of BOB'S latest catalog @$4.75 each Nickle or Chrome. These are mine they are 3/8-24 thread. There are to be leather pads under the brackets. The parts book specifies them. I had old rubber "WET OR DRY" squeegees under my Standards brackets. My Master had them missing and it makes a difference on how the hood fits.. The original bolt heads have the Buick script stamped one face of the hex. BOB'S used to show them that way in their catalogs but now the ones I received from them are plain. They have a regular 3/8-24 nut on them.

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Originally these threaded into a 1/4" thick X 1" wide X 1 1/2" long (approx.size)  threaded plate. They were missing on my Standard. My Master has them. The tapped hole is offset so that once the bolt is started in the plate it will lock against the frame. Then only one hand needed to tighten on the top. The use of a wrench/socket below, up in the frame where the front cross member is can be a royal P I T A! The plate is a better idea but still will take 2 people to hold the plate to start.

Pictures of 1920s Buick Service signs.

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6 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

The original bolt heads have the Buick script stamped one face of the hex. BOB'S used to show them that way in their catalogs but now the ones I received from them are plain. They have a regular 3/8-24 nut on them.

maybe Be able to find some like this ?? with the script now that I know there are  some like this cool thank you for taking the time . 

   So for the signs I am just looking for some cool looking  way to show how much we are a team .Effort - crew working  on are '' per war old Iron '' I will cut some out and send some out to you guys . we are going to try and make some tomorrow .  mark and Larry  showed up at the machine shop today my son Darren showing them how it's done on his big  CNC after we put some good shirts on ! tomorrow  lord willing we should make some cool signs  

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Edited by sligermachine (see edit history)
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I love the free thinkers.    “What do you mean “can’t do it”.  In my world, every thing is possible.  It just may be a bit more expensive but still do-able.  

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On 4/11/2018 at 11:00 AM, Hubert_25-25 said:

I don't know how authentic you are trying to get.

as original as I can .

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