Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Finally, some warm weather! Snow melted, garage and drive clear and I finally found some time to clean and paint parts. Yesterday, I took the springs, front floorboards, front motor mount, rear tranny mount and the battery box supports over to the sandblasters. This is why I usually hire this out - not the greatest job in the world. They did everything in about an hour and a half and I took it all home hoping the temperature would get above 60 so I could paint everything before rust came back. I got the primer on last night as the temps were margial, but okay. I used the heat from my worklamps to keep everything warm. Today dawned warm and clear and I put on a thin coat of black on the springs. Probably overkill, as the motion of the springs will probably wear it away, but hopefully it will keep some rust from forming. As this is going to be a driver, I can't expect perfect springs after a season on the road, but maybe this will help some of the expected rust from showing up on the edges of the leafs - or is it leaves? The two primed parts are the battery box supports. The one primed spring leaf - the little one - I had to go back to the sandblaster to get. It got buried in the sand and was temporarily lost! 32 spring leaves in all! Front motor mount. Rear Tranny mount. Front floorboards. Some pitting from those Syracuse winters, but no holes and they are plenty solid. The rest of the floor is wood. The weather forecast is for a cold front moving in tonight, so it's back to the deep freeze. I can't wait for Spring to arrive. Where the heck is Global Warming when you need it?
  2. Thanks, a better look than "bare metal." <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  3. I'm cleaning up my Delco-Lovejoy shocks and can find no trace of any paint on them - just lots of grease. Does anyone know if these units were painted (black?) or left bare metal? If bare metal I will probably paint them with "cast iron" paint to replicate the unpainted look and still avoid rust.
  4. I checked the rear axle now that things have warmed up a bit. There is no way the axles can touch. The design has a shaft that connects the gears in the differential that is between the two axles. So now I have to see if the axles would be pushed in too much and actually come in contact with the shaft. I'm taking my springs over to be sandblasted tomorrow along with some other parts - the front engine fixture and the transmission mounting support. I'm also starting on the wheels and have the job of trying to break the beads loose on tires that have been in place for over forty years. Not looking forward to it.
  5. You don't have to pull the hole front end (clip) off. Leave the fenders on and just take the hood and radiator off. Then the engine/tranny comes out as one unit.
  6. I think there's pretty much of a consensus that the drawback to placing the shims outside is that the axle may move in too much and interference may result. The other question is will it move the axle inward enough to cause problems with the brake drum interfering with the backing plate. Until I figure out just what the thickness of the shims needs to be, I won't know if this is going to be a problem or not. I mean, are we talking a few thousandths of an inch or an eighth of an inch? I'm going to attempt to measure the thickness of the bearings clamped together with the bearing cups and then the distance inside the bearing housing. The difference, minus the required axle play, should give me a ballpark figure where I stand. The whole purpose is to set axle end play in the bearings. As soon as it warms enough that I can feel my fingers out in the garage, I'll give it a go. Until then, we've probably beaten this topic to death.
  7. I ran into the same problem with a 48 Plymouth I had. I finally ended up having to take the entire front clip off. I'm not an expert on 35s, but from you pictures, you might have enough room to work on that plug - looks like there is some working room between the engine and the firewall. If not, you'll have to take off the hood, remove the radiator and grill surround, disconnect the driveshaft and take the motor and transmission out as one unit. On the 48, I removed all the old freeze plugs, then used a power washer through the holes to blast out all the rust and gunk. There was a ton of it! I think your engine may have a water distribution tube also (not sure when Dodge went to that, my 32 doesn't have one), so see if that has rusted out and replace it if necessary. With the engine out, you can clean and repaint as necessary. I had my generator, water pump and starter rebuilt at the same time. This way you can avoid taking apart anything else as the fenders, headlights and such will all stay in place. That is a very cool car, I'd keep as much of it original as possible! <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  8. Yes, there is a freeze plug on the back of the block and that is probably what is leaking. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  9. The winter weather is slowing down progress. Although we are up to a balmy 21 degrees today, there isn't much I can do since most of the cleaning and derusting has to be done outside - or the inside of the garage would look like a grease storm just went through - and painting is not going to happen until it warms up. This shot of my garge/workshop says it all - Better news with the springs on the old DL. After I posted shots of the disassembled springs a while ago, several folks from the Dodge Brothers Club thaough they might be too rusted to be safe. Just what I needed, another thing to worry about. They suggested taking them to a spring shop to have them checked out. I checked the good old web, hoping to find someone close, and, much to my surprise, there was St. Louis Leaf Spring right across the river in (where else?) St. Louis. On their website they mentioned they had been in business since 1945 in the same location. That sounded good, so I loaded up the springs - all 32 leaves - and hauled them over, hoping the thirty minute drive would be worthwhile. I arrived at an old building that did indeed look like it had been there for almost seventy years. I went in and explained my problem and they said, "bring them in." After a short examination, my springs were deemed slightly pitted, but solid and safe to reuse. They offered to heat them up in their oven to remove scale and rust. They also noticed that the eye bushings in my rear springs were incorrect. They were too large in diameter and whoever installed them had forced the spring eyes and enlarged them. This was bad news. Where the heck was I going to get new bushings? I was actually going to ask them to press out the remains of the bolt that was still stuck in one of the bushings, but since they were both inncorrect and the eye had been forced out of shape, I figured I was sunk. That's when the old guy at the counter whipped out a book that looked as old as he was and checked out what bushings were necessary. He then walked over to the shelves behind him and pulled out a set of NOS bushings. He said they would reshape my spring eye to the correct diameter and install the bushings, plus install new bronze bushings in the front springs. An hour and a half later, I loaded my assembled springs back in the car and drove home. I was amazed they still had the correct bushings at the shop. He also gave me a new set of bolts, a welcome gift as I had cut one in pieces getting it off the mount. One thing I can work on down the basement - where it's warm - is the wood inside the body. Although the DL has an all steel body, there are pieces of wood bolted on inside to attach interior trim above the doors and around the back window. My wood looked pretty good at first. There was absolutely no rot or decay, but the wood was very dry and full of staples where the trim had been attached. I started removing the staples and nails, and the wood started to split. There were also areas that had been sanded at an angle and the wood at the top of the angle was very thin. This was all split and some pieces had already fallen off. I think some of the splitting actually happened at the factory when it was originall installed. The only remedy was new wood - not that big a job. I still have to sand the edges and those angle sands in the back (so it can clear parts of the metal body framework), but they are about finished. My frame should be back from the powder coater as soon as it warms up enough to sandblast. Their sandblasting equipment was frozen solid the other day! Once that is back, I have a clean base to start putting things back together.
  10. Yes, it's the length of the axle housing area for the bearings. You're shimming to make that distance correct for axle shaft end play. It also states that "the two axle shafts are entirely independent of one another. In order to make this adjustment it is necessary to remove the axle shaft and bearings, including the cup of the inner bearings. The shims may then be removed." The fact that there were no shims in the axle when we drove it, Phil, leads me to believe, since they were as far inward as possible without the shims, that there is no way the axles could touch. One suggestion was to clamp the bearing cups on the bearings on the axle, measure the length of the assembly. Then measure the depth of the axle housing and subtract the difference. This would give you the play without shims. You could then install the correct shims to get everything in spec. Whether I can accurately measure the depth of the housing is another matter.
  11. This is why I wondered if putting the shims on the outside would cause the axles to move to far inward. However, I can't believe that that tiny distance could make the ends meet in the center. Certainly the axles aren't that closely machined during manufacture that a few thousands would make any difference. Again, I'm often wrong!
  12. I'm getting ready to clean and assemble my rear axle. I posted a thread about this some time ago here: http://forums.aaca.org/f143/rear-axle-advice-346213.html I solved many of the problems I was asking about and thought I'd get everyone up to date. First my previous questions: What is the best tool to pull the axle and the outer bearing cup out of the housing without damaging anything? It turns out no tool was needed - with the brake backing plate off I just slipped the brake drum back on and put the axle nut on a few turns. This let the brake drum slide back and forth on the axle for maybe a half inch or so. I pulled the drum forward sharply several times and the imtact against the nut pulled the bearing cup and axle right out of the housing. This may not be a good idea if you are going to save the bearings, but I checked them afterwards and didn't detect any damage. What is the best tool to pull the inner race out? There isn't much of a lip to catch or attach any puller to, and it's pretty deep inside there. This was easily accomplished with a rental tool made for the job -something I obviously should have checked for in the first place. It worked so well I forgot to take a photo of it, but it's just the usual three pronged claw with a slide hammer attached. It did the job in nothing flat - once I noticed I wasn't grabbing the bearing cup but the lip that holds the inner seal in place. Lucky I didn't break the axle! Once I was hooked on to the cup, it came off with six or seven good pulls. Do the roller bearings have to be pressed on the axle by a machine shop? How do I get the old ones off? I haven't gotten this far, so I have no answer. It was suggested I cut them off with a cutting disk, and I suppose that will work since I plan to replace them. More on that when I actually remove them. Now for the actual reason for this post. I'm trying to figure out exactly how the axle end play is set up. According to the owner's manual, the only "shop manual" available, the end play is determined by shims placed deep into the axle assembly. Why they would make this so difficult mystifies me. Here's how the axle goes together... First the cutaway of the housing. Next the inner seal is put into place. Now this is the point where the shims that determine axle play go in. You stack them to get the correct clearance. The blue indicates the shims. The inner bearing cup is driven in and rests against the shims. Now you press both bearing races on the axle. Notice the raised lip that locates both races which are driven on from both ends of the axle. Now the axle goes in the housing with the inner bearing race seating in the inner bearing cup. Finally, the outer bearing cup is installed by driving it into the axle housing. The brake backing plate is now installed and this plate forces the outer bearing cup in to its final position. Now you can determine the axle play with an end guage, BUT according to the manual, if it's not correct, you have to take everything apart back to the installation of the shims and add or remove shims to get the play correct! Now I'm sure the engineering experts out there are going to correct me, but what difference does it make if the shims are all the way back in the housing, or are just installed at the outer portion of the housing, here: According to Phil, the previous owner, there were no shims in the housing when he took it apart years ago. I have been told there is a source for them if I need them. Any opinions as to why I couldn't shim the front and get the same result as the factory recommendation? All you are doing is making sure the length of the space between the back of the housing and the front is correct so there is proper axle play. I can't believe that shimming up front would move the axle back toward the differential enough to cause any problems. Then again, I have been proven wrong - more times than I'd like to admit.
  13. Interesting that both the main and con rod bearings are standard. The crank must have been in great shape, or they put a new one in.
  14. Ian, I think that ripple effect is deep rust pits that have been painted over. This is what leads me to believe this car has more rust than what might be apparent from a casual glance. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  15. I will always lean toward getting a car back on the road, hopefully as original as possible. Fiberglass fenders are certainly an option, especially if this is just going to be a fun driver, but be sure to keep the original fenders and running boards in a safe, dry place in case you want to do a restoration in the future. Fiberglass repairs alone just aren't going to cut it with this car. This isn't rust like you find in the lower fenders of 50s cars. The body area you are addressing is a structural part of the car. Plus, fiberglassing over rust isn't going to stop the cancer. In a few years you're going to be dealing with the same rust bubbling out all over the repaired areas. Even if you finish with fiberglass, you are going to have to cut out ALL the rusted areas and patch them with metal. If you don't, the repair will be temporary and lead to big problems down the line - the type of problem you're seeing in the pictures. To compound the problem, the cost in time, materials, and most of all, paint is going to be almost as expensive as doing it right. Buy a welder, get some sheet metal and go to work. It's fun and very satisfying. Even if your work isn't all that smooth and professional, the new body fillers work well, last, and are easy to work with. Much better than fiberglass. Of course, you could just get it in excellent and safe running and driving condition, throw blankets over the seats and drive the heck out of it as is. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  16. Not trying to put a damper on this, but I'd be very careful with this car. Lots of good things - pretty complete, lots of hard to find items are there, very attractive car - but I can see some things that are eerily similar the my project and they spell trouble. Yes that splash apron can be fabricated, but I wouldn't call it an easy job. It looks like it was just painted over the rust and pits - not a good sign of what's under the rest of that blue paint. I'd be even more worried about the area above the apron. That looks like a hunk of bondo peeling off. This was the area on my DL that turned out to be nothing but rust - and I only had a small hole showing before the paint came off, nothing as bad as yours was visible. I would almost guarantee that that strip just below the doors and above the apron is toast and that one is no picnic - just see my thread for what we had to do to get that area right. That crack in the fender, I suspect, is just the beginning. I had the same sort of rust showing on my back fenders and once we got them off there was literally no good metal in the area where the fender meets the body. Again, all this can be repaired, but I have seen some nice, driver quality Chrysler product sedans from this era go for between ten and fifteen thousand. Even if you got it for four grand, you'll have another fifteen in it to get it to a dependable driver. Take it from someone in the middle of the same process. It's a cool looking car, but not a daily driver in that shape. I can only guess what the brakes, cooling system, wiring and fuel tank are like. As a project, I'd say get it cheap if you can and enjoy working on it, but don't plan a nice Sunday drive in the next few weeks. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  17. Solved! As usual, the solution turned out to be simple and logical once I thought about it. There had to be some way to get back inside the emergency brake drum. I looked for some sort of access hatch in the dust cover, but couldn't see anything through the grease and crud. It's the piece highlighted in purple in this photo: I could see that the plate was held on by small bolts and was pleased to find that they came out - once I found them all, they looked like little round blobs before a scraped them clean - and did not have a nut on the other side, but screwed into a threaded fitting. As soon as I had the first two bolts off, half the plate fell away. That was the secret - it's in two pieces so it can come off and doesn't have to slip off the shaft. I suspected this might be the case yesterday, but I couldn't find any trace of a seam under all the crud. Here's the little bugger in all its glory. Once I had both pieces off, I could get access to the inside of the emergency brake drum and with a socket wrench with a U-joint extension, I could hold the nut and turn the bolts out. Once they were free the U-joint came right off. And there was the big nut staring me right in the face. I got it off with a little work, then used a puller to remove the flange from the shaft and transmission seal. It was a bear to get off, but finally began to move and then the puller got it off the shaft. Now the brake drum and the brake band support bracket came free with no obstructions. Finally, my original purpose could be accomplished. With everything out of the way, the transmission support bracket could be slid off the trans. Now the transmission is stripped down and ready for cleaning and inspection. Notice the free-wheeling extension on the back. Thanks for all the help and advice! <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  18. Solved! As usual, the solution turned out to be simple and logical once I thought about it. There had to be some way to get back inside the emergency brake drum. I looked for some sort of access hatch in the dust cover, but couldn't see anything through the grease and crud. It's the piece highlighted in purple in this photo: I could see that the plate was held on by small bolts and was pleased to find that they came out - once I found them all, they looked like little round blobs before a scraped them clean - and did not have a nut on the other side, but screwed into a threaded fitting. As soon as I had the first two bolts off, half the plate fell away. That was the secret - it's in two pieces so it can come off and doesn't have to slip off the shaft. I suspected this might be the case yesterday, but I couldn't find any trace of a seam under all the crud. Here's the little bugger in all its glory. Once I had both pieces off, I could get access to the inside of the emergency brake drum and with a socket wrench with a U-joint extension, I could hold the nut and turn the bolts out. Once they were free the U-joint came right off. And there was the big nut staring me right in the face. I got it off with a little work, then used a puller to remove the flange from the shaft and transmission seal. It was a bear to get off, but finally began to move and then the puller got it off the shaft. Now the brake drum and the brake band support bracket came free with no obstructions. Finally, my original purpose could be accomplished. With everything out of the way, the transmission support bracket could be slid off the trans. Now the transmission is stripped down and ready for cleaning and inspection. Notice the free-wheeling extension on the back. Thanks for all the help and advice!
  19. The bolt heads are too close to the housing to get a socket - even a htin-walled socket - on them. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  20. A professional version of Photoshop. I make my living doing videos and graphics so it's a no-brainer for me. Something of a learning curve otherwise. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  21. I wish, but the owner's manual cutaway drawing shows a big old nut holding it on. I'm heading out to the garage to try again and I'll post any progress - or lack thereof. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  22. I had a similar idea, but if you look closely at the bolts you will see they are very close to the housing. There isn't enough room to get a socket on there. The only thing you can use to loosen the bolts is an open-ended wrench. I know there is a simple answer to this problem and I'll probably be slapping my head once I discover it, but for now all I can do is scratch my head. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  23. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>Thanks keiser31. I wish my brake drum was that easy to access. Mine faces the opposite way and that's where the problem lies. Thanks for trying.
  24. I posted this elsewhere but thought i might catch someone's attention on this thread. Subject: 1932 Dodge DL Transmission Problem: Confused restorer I'm working on my 32DL tranny and have run into a problem. It's the classic Chinese Puzzle and I'm just plain stuck. I'm taking off all the Floating Power motor and transmission mounts to send in to Tom Hannaford to have them revulcanized. The transmission sets in a rubber cradle that's bolted to a stamped metal bracket that bolts into the X member of the frame. I got the rubber mount off with no problem - half of it is attached to the tranny and the other half to the bracket. Now I want to slide the bracket off so I can clean everything up. Here is the transmission with the bracket (in blue) just sitting in place. It's not attached to the tranny in any way at this point and will rotate and slide forward and back. It's actually upside down in this shot and the two holes are where the rubber mount was attached inside the bracket. I should be able to just slide it over the emergency brake drum. BUT NO! Notice the emergency brake support pointed out in the photo. The nuts on the studs that hold it on came off just fine, however when I try to pull it forward to clear the studs, it hits the edge of the emergency brake drum before it can clear. I also can't get the studs out as they hit the brake drum before they are completely unscrewed. With this support bracket there, I can't slide the large bracket over the brake drum. No big deal, right? Just take off the emergency brake drum - I'm going to need to have it turned to clean up some grooves in the surface, anyway - and then the brake support will slide off and so will the big bracket. So, from the owner's manual it looks like the emergency brake drum is held on by a large nut on the shaft coming out of the free-wheeling portion of the tranny. Looking things over, that bolt must be under the front U-joint. So, I have to take off the U-joint. Here is the U-joint highlighted in green. It's held on by lots of bolts - just like at the rear axle. So I start to take them off - after carefully marking the position to keep everything the same when it goes back together. With a little effort, the bolts loosen up. It's then that I realize they are held on by nuts inside the drum. So I go back to the rear of the drum to see if there is enough room to get a wrench in there to hold the nuts. Hmmmm... Dodge has thoughtfully provided a plate that covers the drum. You can see it highlighted in purple. It apparently keeps the dirt - and me - out. It's bolted on, and doesn't spin with the drum, but even if I get the bolts out, I can't get it out of there without taking off the drum, which I can't do because... So, I can't get to the nuts, to remove the U-joint, to remove the drum, to slide off the band support, to slide off the trans bracket. Has anyone done this - and how the heck did you do it? It obviously can be done - they put it together in the factory - I just can't figure it out. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  25. They were about $380 each, not cheap but totally new except for the casing and end pieces. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>