Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. My 29 Plymouth had some thin material just like the stuff they use on frame to body insulation. A thin, woven material that was glued on to the wood. It wasn't all over, just in a few strategic spots.
  2. This is what you need. Not sure of the quality of this one, but it looks like this. Don't get a cheap look-alike, it will break. Hub Puller Old Forge 2519 | eBay
  3. I checked Harnesses Unlimited and they don't carry a harness for a 32 Dodge. Both Y and Z and Rhode Island Wiring have them with RI being somewhat less expensive. I bought my harness for my 48 Plymouth from RI and was very happy with the product. I talked to Rhode Island Wiring this morning and they will do the looming for $4.50 a foot plus a $7.00 set up charge. They were very helpful on the phone. So, now I have to decide whether to go with a completed harness or try a partial DIY and let them do the looming.
  4. Thanks Friartuck. I actually write and direct videos, so I'm very familiar with gaff tape. I'm not sure how it would hold up under the elements. It's designed to peel away without leaving any sticky residue and I'm not really sure of its staying power. I'll run a few tests and see what happens as I have a roll of the cloth-based black tape handy.
  5. Yeah, that's what I was afraid off. Building a wiring loom machine is beyond my pay grade I'm afraid.
  6. I started on the wiring today on my 1932 Dodge DL and immediately ran into a new problem. (Seems like there is one a day lately!) All of the wiring harness is neatly encased in a nicely made woven loom. Rhode Island Wiring has looms of different sizes, so I thought I would be alright. as usual, WRONG! The loom seems to have been woven OVER the wiring harness after it was put together. The problem is, where the loom joints off into smaller offshoot looms, the connection is woven together. It's these connections that have me baffled. How can I joint the two different loom sizes seamlessly as the factory did it. I have a feeling the answer is - I CAN'T! In these pictures you can see how the various looms join together. I brought up the levels so you can see the pattern of the loom threads. Notice the loom actually expands in one area. Where the loom branches off into a Y it looks like the two smaller looms may be jammed into the larger one. I don't know how much the loom will stretch, and I might be able to pull that off, but where the smaller loom comes out of the larger at about a 90 degree angle really has me stumped. All the other harnesses I've done have had cloth tape wrapped around the harness. This is the first one with looms like this. Leave it to Dodge Brothers to give you a quality job in 1932 rather than saving a few pennies per wiring job. But it leaves me in a quandary. Any loom experts out there with a solution? I'd call Rhode Island wiring, but it's the holiday weekend and I doubt they have an answer other than taping up the joins.
  7. I started on the wiring today and immediately ran into a new problem. (Seems like there is one a day lately!) All of the wiring harness is neatly encased in a nicely made woven loom. Rhode Island Wiring has looms of different sizes, so I thought I would be alright. as usual, WRONG! The loom seems to have been woven OVER the wiring harness after it was put together. The problem is, where the loom joints off into smaller offshoot looms, the connection is woven together. It's these connections that have me baffled. How can I joint the two different loom sizes seamlessly as the factory did it. I have a feeling the answer is - I CAN'T! In these pictures you can see how the various looms join together. I brought up the levels so you can see the pattern of the loom threads. Notice the loom actually expands in one area. Where the loom branches off into a Y it looks like the two smaller looms may be jammed into the larger one. I don't know how much the loom will stretch, and I might be able to pull that off, but where the smaller loom comes out of the larger at about a 90 degree angle really has me stumped. All the other harnesses I've done have had cloth tape wrapped around the harness. This is the first one with looms like this. Leave it to Dodge Brothers to give you a quality job in 1932 rather than saving a few pennies per wiring job. But it leaves me in a quandary. Any loom experts out there with a solution? I'd call Rhode Island wiring, but it's the holiday weekend and I doubt they have an answer other than taping up the joins.
  8. Dave, I too grew up in Detroit and my dad also worked for GM for 40 years. We grew up with GM cars and all my new cars have been GM products. But, for some reason, all my old cars have been Mopars, starting with a 1932 Dodge DL that I bought in college and just found and bought back this year. My other Mopars were a 1929 Plymouth Model U, a 1948 Plymouth P-15, a 1950 Dodge Wayfarer sedan and a 1950 Dodge Wayfarer roadster. I remember my wife and I driving up from St. Louis, Missouri to Burchills in Port Huron, Michigan in 1973 to by parts for the 29. They had a full set of NOS hubcaps for the wood wheels, a NOS tail light and many other goodies right on the shelves. I wish it was that easy with my current 32. Those were the days.
  9. I sold her years ago, but as I remember, my 29 Model U had a black engine with a silver head, black firewall (not sure about that, I seem to remember some discussion about whether it should be black or body color), black generator, starter, and distributor. I think the 28 models were the same. You might check the Plymouth threads and ask there.
  10. To quote Obi-wan Kenobi: "Anakin, how many times have I told you to stay away from the power couplings." A very interesting little film. You learn something every day. My problem is I usually forget it by tomorrow.
  11. 32bizcoupe, I just went to my local glass shop. They will cut (and polish the edges) new laminated glass for me based on my old windows - which I'll bring in to them. Just make sure your glass shop has glass the correct thickness. At least you have a coupe! I have eight pieces of glass to deal with. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  12. I will. Looks like pretty thick steel, however. There could be a problem bending something that thick. I suspect the part was originally stamped.
  13. It is a 1/2 wrench size. Those look close, but I would certainly opt for steel as they are body mount bolts. They are also thinner and flatter on top. thanks for the heads up!
  14. T-bolts are too large. The wrench size is 1/2 inch. I need thread all the way to the top - no shoulder. Rockler has something close for clamping work to a saw table, but they are thinner and flat on the top. I suspect they are also standard, and I'd like to use Grade 8 for body mounting. Time to get out the grinder. These are the Rockler bolts: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1573
  15. Ian, Can't seem to find the Restoration Supply Company you're speaking of. I found Restoration Specialties & Supply Company but they don't have what I'm looking for.
  16. Finally! The answer to the mysterious rubber channel. Thanks 34doger. I'm sure I'll have good luck finding one of those. Looks like another trip to my sheet-metal guy.
  17. Lots of good ideas. I thought about grinding them down, but as keiser31 says, they aren't wide enough. I guess I could try to weld extra on, but there are 18 or 20 bolts and my welding skills are less than stellar. They really have to be very close to the original size or the head of the bolt will end up distorting the trim piece when tightened. They also have to be able to slide easily in the channel to position all the bolts correctly.
  18. The body of my Dodge DL is attached by bolts that rest in a channel-shaped trim piece, then extend through the running board splash piece, the body, and then the frame. I've seen these called channel bolts, T-bolts, and captive bolts. The problem is, I can't find anyone who has them. Grainger and McMaster-Carr don't list them. Anyone know of a source? They take a 1/2 nut and are about an inch and 5/8 long. The rounded end slides into the channel trim piece and is held there blind where it can't turn. This allows you to tighten the nut without having to hold the bolt from the front.
  19. The body of my DL is attached by bolts that rest in a channel- shaped trim piece, then extend through the running board splash piece, the body, and then the frame. I've seen these called channel bolts, T-bolts, and captive bolts. The problem is, I can't find anyone who has them. Grainger and McMaster-Carr don't list them. Anyone know of a source? They take a 1/2 nut and are about an inch and 5/8 long. The rounded end slides into the channel trim piece and is held there blind where it can't turn. This allows you to tighten the nut without having to hold the bolt from the front.
  20. With the frame and body still at Ed's and the rest of the sheet-metal at Crin's for paint, I was running out of projects, so I tackled the windshield. All these photos were taken after I got it apart - that's why there's no glass. Upon examination, the window frame is just two pieces, the lower half which consists of the curved bottom and the two uprights, and the top piece that goes straight across. Disassembly looked simple - it always does - but turned out to be a bit more complicated. It looked like two simple bolts held the top piece to the bottom piece. Both came out easily. These things are sometimes called sex bolts since one screws into the other. With them removed, I figured the top piece would just pull right off. WRONG! Something was preventing it from coming loose. I thought maybe the glass was sticking and preventing it from coming free, so I tapped at it with a hard piece of wood trying to get it loosened up without breaking the glass. After about five taps - the glass broke. I discovered that it was plain old glass, not tempered, not safety. This came as something of a shock as I thought DB were using some sort of safety glass in at least the windshield by 1932, but I was wrong. No big deal since I plan on replacing all the glass, anyway. So, obviously, something else was holding the top piece on. Originally, there were hinge pivots sticking out near the top of the frame, simple metal rods that rest on pivot brackets inside the body. Mine were broken off long ago - before I bought the car in 65. Looking closely, I could see the remains of the rods still the top of the uprights. I had no choice at this point. so I carefully drilled them out. It was easy since I think they were made of pot metal! No wonder they broke! Most of my Dodge has impressive engineering for its time, but someone dropped the ball with this one. Once they were out I discovered these little guys hiding back inside the top piece. The hinge rods were designed to screw onto this piece. With the remains of the rods gone, the top piece came right off. The glass was held in place by a channel that seems to be made of a felt-like material. It isn't rubber, that's for sure. The top piece is really pitted and has rather thin walls, so I'm not sure it can be replated. I'll take it to the chrome shop, but I'm not optimistic. If it's not good, I'm thinking of having the piece machined as its really just a simple channel with a rounded section on top. The bottom section is much heavier, with thick walls. It should clean up and plate nicely. As usual, each new project presents its own set of problems. Coming up with solutions is the fun part.
  21. Sounds like it. I won't know for sure until I see my "new" one, but if you need one I'll keep you in mind.
  22. Word back from the radiator shop that my radiator is toast. When they were hot tanking it, chunks of Stop Leak where coming out in massive amounts. Plus, my top tank has a split in it. Luckily, I found a replacemnt from a 20,000 mile DL that I'm going to pick up at Hershey. Now, I have an extra bracket if I need one.
  23. I brought the last batch of parts over to Crin this morning. The other hood top, the other running board side piece, the luggage rack and assorted trim pieces. Now he has everything but the body and the hood sides. He's working on the front fenders and is using an Evercoat product called Slick Sand. It's basically a spray-on body filler. I could not believe how it covered pits and small imperfections on the fenders. Once he had two coats on, he sanded the fenders. Only a few low spots showed up that will need actual body filler applied in the usual manor. Once that's on and sanded, he'll apply one more light coat of Slick Sand, a guide coat, and do the final sanding. Then it's ready for paint. As Crin mentioned to me, it's going to be black and that shows every imperfection, so these have to be right. You can see the coat of Slick Sand in these pictures. I some areas where it went on very heavy, you can see slight ripples. That just excess or "runs" that sand out very nicely and leave a smooth surface. It seems strange to have all the exterior parts out of my hands and getting prepared for paint, but I'm certainly not complaining.
  24. I found a radiator bracket. Thanks to those who tried to find one.
  25. I just wanted to thank everyone for their kind words. Sorry I haven't responded individually, but this thread is probably already too long as it is. I hope you're finding at least some of this stuff interesting.